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Did King Kong inspire the legend of Nessie ?

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Researchers in America have linked the 1933 movie with the first modern Loch Ness Monster sightings.

The Columbia University study has suggested that some of the prehistoric denizens featured in King Kong, such as a large long-necked humpback creature, may have been the catalyst that triggered the modern Loch Ness Monster phenomenon.

Read More: http://www.unexplain...egend-of-nessie

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I think legends of long necked sea serpents have been around forever, you only need to look at the old sea charts. not everything is inspired by Hollywood.

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But king kong could've put the idea back in people's heads.

I'd normally agree with you, but the correlation is there.

Doesn't mean it is connected but it seems plausible

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Yep it's plausible and King Kong almost certainly revived an interest in such things, but i think the description of Nessie has remained pretty much unchanged.

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Wasn't the first "recorded sightings" back in the Viking era?

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I think legends of long necked sea serpents have been around forever, you only need to look at the old sea charts. not everything is inspired by Hollywood.

I agree with this. But rather than let the idea go to waste, perhaps a "King Kong meets The Loch Ness Monster" feature film should be created. For reasons.

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A bit like the UFO phenomenon. While there have been sightings of unusual things in the sky for centuries, the widespread reporting of these objects happened during the cold war, starting with Sputnik and the dawn of science fiction movies. Whether this is life imitating art or the reverse, there was still a huge uptick in the number of reports around this time. Interestingly, it seems to me as a casual observer (and I may be completely wrong) there are fewer credible reports now-a-days while everyone is armed with a camera phone and with photoshop technology.

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No because that doesn't explain the other Lake Cryptids like Champ etc.,

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I'd say it's plausible. Much like the movie Species was responsible for creating the chupacabra.

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King Kong was Bigfoots brother.

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Nessie was spotted as far back as the 6th century and King Kong is from the 1930's. Yes, I see the connection..

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I think the article isn't so much implying that it inspired the legend so much as the modern image of Nessie (long neck, single hump, etc). Earlier "sightings" consisted of vague discriptions of something animal like, as opposed to nowadays where the image is universal.

Granted, I think a large part is thanks to the "Surgeon's Photograph".

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The description reads, they witnessed the creature crossing the road. Any known animal crossing the road would be identifiable in my opinion. So unless the story was completely fabricated, which of course it could have been, they had plenty of time to identify it.

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Oddly King Kong was released in April of 1933 and accordin to the Nessie Wiki page "Modern interest in the monster was sparked by a sighting on 22 July 1933, when George Spicer and his wife saw 'a most extraordinary form of animal' cross the road in front of their car."

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King Kong isn't a sea serpent. Surely not?

The sightings of a monster at Loch Ness have been recorded for centuries.

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King Kong isn't a sea serpent. Surely not?

The sightings of a monster at Loch Ness have been recorded for centuries.

King Kong is actually Bigfoot, but mutated by nuclear fallout just like Godzilla.

Edited by Ashyne
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I didn't know that King Kong was a product of fallout radiation but a natural (fictional) monster living on Skull Island, where also inhabited by humans and dinosaurs. The original film was made in the 1930's before anyone knew of nuclear bombs and the effects of mutations.

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kedele.jpg

http://home.yowieoca...h_Ness_Monster/

Comparing what the Spicer's claimed to have seen with the brontosaurus from King Kong:

2ms4py0.jpg

http://frontiersofzo...ontosaurus.html

This article also has the following quote:

The Spicers were both groggy after a long drive and returning home after seeing the new movie feature King Kong. They said they saw the Brontosaurus out of that movie originally, and gave several conflicting size estimates after the sighting. This is an unconventional explanation, but I think they both projected the image of the King Kong brontosaurus onto a real area–call it a hallucination if you will.

Had the Spicers just watched King Kong prior to this sighting? Does anyone have access to Rupert Gould's (1934) The Loch Ness Monster and Others?

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I didn't know that King Kong was a product of fallout radiation but a natural (fictional) monster living on Skull Island, where also inhabited by humans and dinosaurs. The original film was made in the 1930's before anyone knew of nuclear bombs and the effects of mutations.

no, King Kong was based on Komodo Island, where as you know Komodo dragons are huge.

Its called island gigantism

"Cooper's friend Douglas Burden's trip to the island of Komodo and his encounter with the Komodo Dragons there was a big influence on the Kong story.[20] Cooper was fascinated by Burdens adventures as chronicled in his book Dragon Lizards of Komodo where he referred to the animal as the "King of Komodo".[19] It was this phrase along with Komodo and C(K)ongo (and his overall love for hard sounding K words)[21] that gave him the idea to name the giant ape Kong. He loved the name as it had a "mystery sound" to it."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Kong

Edited by Yes_Man

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Basic rule of statistics ... correlation does not imply causation. Also in 1933, The Shape of Things to Come published, Lost Horizon published, Battersea Power Station the largest brick building in Europe, British Interplanetary Society, first British bird observatory, giant airship Akron crashed into the ocean, the Depression, ...

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This was not a "Columbia University study", it was alleged in a chapter of the book ABOMINABLE SCIENCE published by Columbia University Press. An abominably bad book, and the chapter on Nessie is full of factual errors as well as the silly claim about King Kong. For a fully detailed and documented analysis, see https://dl.dropboxus...ssieChapter.pdf

Henry Bauer, www.henryhbauer.homestead.com

Edited by hhbauer

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Oddly King Kong was released in April of 1933 and accordin to the Nessie Wiki page "Modern interest in the monster was sparked by a sighting on 22 July 1933, when George Spicer and his wife saw 'a most extraordinary form of animal' cross the road in front of their car."

A most bizarre sighting as Nessie hasn't bothered leaving the Loch and going for a stroll since.

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I didn't know that King Kong was a product of fallout radiation but a natural (fictional) monster living on Skull Island, where also inhabited by humans and dinosaurs. The original film was made in the 1930's before anyone knew of nuclear bombs and the effects of mutations.

Nuclear bombs have been around since ancient times. If you watch some episodes of Ancient Aliens, they talk about and show ancient cities that obviously were devastated by nuclear bombs with traces of radiation and explosive damage.

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no, King Kong was based on Komodo Island, where as you know Komodo dragons are huge.

Its called island gigantism

"Cooper's friend Douglas Burden's trip to the island of Komodo and his encounter with the Komodo Dragons there was a big influence on the Kong story.[20] Cooper was fascinated by Burdens adventures as chronicled in his book Dragon Lizards of Komodo where he referred to the animal as the "King of Komodo".[19] It was this phrase along with Komodo and C(K)ongo (and his overall love for hard sounding K words)[21] that gave him the idea to name the giant ape Kong. He loved the name as it had a "mystery sound" to it."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Kong

So how is Bigfoot related to King Kong? They are the same species, no? King Kong is king of the Bigfoots?

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Yes I've always been sure that ancient atomic warfare happened and there is so much we don't understand about prehistory. Puting that aside though, I wasn't sure if the 1930's film makers were aware of all that.

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