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Waspie_Dwarf

A Late Summer Solar Flare

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NASA Captures Images of a Late Summer Flare

On Aug. 24, 2014, the sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 8:16 a.m. EDT. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured images of the flare, which erupted on the left side of the sun. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.

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Posted (edited)

Late Summer M5 Solar Flare - August, 24, 2014

On Aug. 24, 2014, the sun emitted a mid-level solar flare, peaking at 8:16 a.m. EDT. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured images of the flare, which erupted on the left side of the sun. Solar flares are powerful bursts of radiation. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however -- when intense enough -- they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.

To see how this event may affect Earth, please visit NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center at http://spaceweather.gov, the U.S. government's official source for space weather forecasts, alerts, watches and warnings.

This flare is classified as an M5 flare. M-class flares are ten times less powerful than the most intense flares, called X-class flares.

Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

Source: NASA Goddard - Multimedia

Edited by Waspie_Dwarf

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NASA's STEREO "Winks" and Provides Stunning Solar Imagery

NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory witnessed a dramatic solar eruption on Aug. 24, 2014 -- even with one of its "eyes" partially closed.

This imagery of a coronal mass ejection, a giant explosion of solar material that explodes out into space, was captured by one of STEREO's two spacecraft, STEREO-B, which currently has a view of the far side of the sun.

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Edited by Waspie_Dwarf

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STEREO's View of Aug. 24, 2014 Eruption

A bright eruption of solar material surges into space as captured by NASA's Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory, which currently has a view of the far side of the sun.

Credit: NASA/STEREO

Source: NASA - Multimedia

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Awesome to see images of huge solar flares.. on the "FAR" !? side of the sun?

Edited by lightly

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on the "FAR" !? side of the sun?

Yes, the STEREO spacecraft are in solar orbit and are positioned so that at least one of them gets to view the side of the sun hidden from Earth.

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