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metacast

Hollow Earth and Melting Arctic

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Posted (edited)

Heya I'm a newbie to Hollow Earth theory and just recently enjoying all the stories and podcasts on the internet.

I baffles me that the Admiral Byrd dude could report what he saw at the north pole and all the people who visit the north pole never stumble on the same trail, unless they all go through educated travel guides that mislead them, or the GPS itself skews data which is exhausting.

Although I do want the fast track to the today's updated arguments, answers to the above is not what I'm after today. Today I am wondering what's the deal with the melting arctic and if the arctic melts then how's the theory going to work out? Fishermen sailing to the green lands of mammoths?

Edited by metacast

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Hollow earth theory was shot down a long time ago. Gravity Doesn't work that way. It's really too bad, too. Pellucidar sounded like such a nice place. Gravity pulls in only one direction; to the center of mass, even if the center is a void.

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First time hearing the word Pellucidar. Hollow Earth still looks like it's going strong on the internet though, so people seem to still be entertaining it. The themes I remember hearing was beliefs that electromagnetism plays funny with gravity. I'm assuming there are theories that the gravity flips on the inner concave? I'm telling you I am really new at this.

How about on this forum, are there people who still actively drive at it, long standing members?

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Through the measurement of P and S waves during seismic events, we can easily see that the Earth is not hollow.

And that is just one of literately thousands of ways that we can tell the Earth is not hollow.

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Posted (edited)

First time hearing the word Pellucidar. Hollow Earth still looks like it's going strong on the internet though, so people seem to still be entertaining it. The themes I remember hearing was beliefs that electromagnetism plays funny with gravity. I'm assuming there are theories that the gravity flips on the inner concave? I'm telling you I am really new at this.

How about on this forum, are there people who still actively drive at it, long standing members?

Pellucidar was Edgar Rice Burroughs book, nothing more than 100+ year old science-fiction. Since then the entire concept has been nothing more than science-fiction.

As to your last question there was one member, not long standing, that drove the hollow earth theory here for a little while. He became too obtuse and was banned from the forums not long after.

Edit: spellisms

ETA: Now that I remember correctly his theory wasn't that we live on a hollow earth, is that we live inside a hollow earth. He said that he had proof of, I think it was, a lenticular earth because of photographs he had taken on beaches.

Edited by Likely Guy
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Daw, that's unfortunate on all accounts. Well, still, with the melting arctic do you guys think we'll see fishermen have north pole parties? I mean, any chance these ice caps give us a new free range open ocean permanently?

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Hollow Earth doesnt nessasarily mean a great big void inside the world, it could also relate to cavernouse areas where normal gravity would still remian in effect.

Though feasible from a dust formation solar system effect, in that centripedal forces would have naturally created an inner cavity, subsequent cooling could very well have reduced any such cavity and probably merged most of it back with the heavy core, which would not have succumbed to the centripedal effect I am guessing due to its mass.

i love the Admiral Byrd story and wish it held some form of veracity as new worlds for exploration and wonder are only now inner and outer space, both too far for any one to afford.

Still, who knows what the future may reveal...or not.

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When I was digging around about the hollow earth theory, I read that the beings that live in there decide who to let in. I don't know. But it's still pretty interesting.

If it was that the source of gravity was within the crust of the earth, then maybe somehow it could work, but I don't know. I heard that scientists found large reserves of water beneath the crust of the earth somewhere, but I haven't read about it.

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This is a post by Essan, made in the ancient times on this very forum. i searched for the actual post to link to it, but for some reason cant find any. so here i am posting the text, wehich i had saved for use elsewhere

Actually if you ask a geologist and they say "we think" earth is hollow they should request their money back for their degree. They will say "we think such and such is at the core", but not that the earth is hollow, baring they are crazy.

Actually were are going to do two things. First we are going to calculate the weight of the earth with good ol newton.

So I am going to assume you are familiar with Newton's equation for the force exerted by two objects upon each other.

equation 1: F*=G(m1m2)/R2

So G is the universal constant for gravitation.( 6.67 x 10-11 m3/kg s2), So from now on when I use G, I am going to be referring to that number.

Knowing that,

equation 2: F=m2a we will plug that into equation 1 for F*

equation 3: m2a=G(m1m2)/R2

Now for this, m1 is the mass of the Earth, m2 is the mass of an object on the surface of the Earth, a is the acceleration of that object near earths surface which we know to be 9.8 m/s2.

I am going to assume that you have basic algebra skills and can solve for m1 in equation 2.

And we end up with this.

m1=aR2/G

So now our only problem is finding the R, which is radius of the earth. Now to save time, and my fingers, I am going to give the radius of the earth, 6.38x106 meters. If you are interested in calculating the R of the earth using shadows on your own click HERE

Anywho, back to the problem at hand, now that we have all the varriables lets plug and chug.

m1={(9.8 m/s2)(6.38x106 m)2}/ 6.67 x 10-11 m3/kg s2, solving we get the mass of the earth me= 5.98x1024 kg.

Now that is heavy! Far to heavy to be hallow, but lets not stop here.

We have our trust old density equation D=M/V.

Now since we have calculated the mass and we did (well faked) our shadow experiment to find the radius, R we can solve for the density of earth.

We need to remember how to find volume of a sphere, (heres a good point to clarify notation, for Pi we will use p), (4/3)pR3

So plugging it all in we get

D=(5.98x1024 kg)/((4/3)p(6.38x106 m)3 and we get?

5497.3 Kg/m3 which we can quickly convert to the standard density unit g/cm3, and have 5.497 g/cm3

Great but what does this tell us?

Well for one we know that the most rocks on the surface of the earth have the density 2.7 g/cm3, water is approximately 1 g/cm3 and Earths upper mantel (peridotite) is about 3.4 g/cm3.

This tells us that the center cannot be hollow and actually has to be something much more dense.

Now we can test this experimentally as well and will be doing so shortly many mechanisms using Neutrinos have been proposed and while they may not match our radial based density calculation I am sure they are not going to support the "Hollow earth" theory.

Anyway here is one example.

Probing the absolute density of the Earth’s core using a vertical neutrino beam

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When I was digging around about the hollow earth theory, I read that the beings that live in there decide who to let in. I don't know. But it's still pretty interesting.

If it was that the source of gravity was within the crust of the earth, then maybe somehow it could work, but I don't know. I heard that scientists found large reserves of water beneath the crust of the earth somewhere, but I haven't read about it.

If you haven't read it -- and clearly don't understand it -- why would you use it as part of an (admittedly weak) argument?

I wonder if people did this with gravity: "I heard about this thing that explains planetary motion and why things fall down to Earth. Maybe it something to do with why Nan never gets better when the barber bleeds her for rhuematism?"

--Jaylemurph

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Jayleymurph, he's just sharing hearsay. No harm no foul. No arguments here yet. Just fun.

though I am kinda upset noone is playing with my arctic ice melting questions. I'm really looking forward to new open oceans. Are we going to get them permanently in the north?

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. I'm really looking forward to new open oceans. Are we going to get them permanently in the north?

No. The melting ice will cause the gulf stream to slow to a stop enabling winter ice to spread and stay year round. So a first you would have ice less arctic waters, but soon you would have completely ice covered arctic waters.

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What's the assumed timeframe for this seasonal pattern development? 200 years for a complete arctic flush and rebuild?

Edited by metacast

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Jayleymurph, he's just sharing hearsay. No harm no foul. No arguments here yet. Just fun.

though I am kinda upset noone is playing with my arctic ice melting questions. I'm really looking forward to new open oceans. Are we going to get them permanently in the north?

Some of us think there's great harm in lazy thinking.

--Jaylemurph

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Some of us think there's great harm in lazy thinking.

--Jaylemurph

Coming from someone who has no theories of his own, and just quotes wikipedia/or whatever is the "mainstream" consensus. lol.

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Coming from someone who has no theories of his own, and just quotes wikipedia/or whatever is the "mainstream" consensus. lol.

To the contrary of some deep wading of the fringe, mainstream at least makes sense, is demonstrable and does not stink... it also needs less "what ifs" to make a conclusive theory.

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Well the whole point of this sidetrack is that @nighthawk was not proposing an argument. He was just sharing the little bit of findings he had and giving them context without bias. Completely appropriate and appreciated.

Also before posting this thread, even yesterday, I was having a conversation about this and topic sub-earthen waters popped up. So the ethos is there and the reply on track.

No harm no foul, move on. Ignore it. Wait for a big player to turn this into an argument. Until then we're a bunch of spectators and commentators on an empty arena.

So does anyone have any data on the season pattern of ice cap melting and reforming... concerning historical data and legth of open periods versus closed periods?

So far it's mentioned that the jet-streams will slow and that due to lack of circulation the icecaps will reform, once again, in force. ... and the entrance to hollow earth will reappear with mammoths and all.

Edited by metacast
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Coming from someone who has no theories of his own, and just quotes wikipedia/or whatever is the "mainstream" consensus. lol.

From someone who rejects outright anything that's peer reviewed or doesn't conform to their own bias ... "lol" indeed.

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Come on guys. I want to hang out at this forum a bit. Yall keep at each other's characters you're going to drive me away.

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Consider it an electronic "speaker's corner" where everyone gets a chance to speak, but has to run the risk of someone shouting "coocoo" at their ideas when they do so.

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Metacast, you cannot guide the discussion. What 'Sir Wearer of Hats' said is true.

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Heya I'm a newbie to Hollow Earth theory and just recently enjoying all the stories and podcasts on the internet.

I baffles me that the Admiral Byrd dude could report what he saw at the north pole and all the people who visit the north pole never stumble on the same trail, unless they all go through educated travel guides that mislead them, or the GPS itself skews data which is exhausting.

Although I do want the fast track to the today's updated arguments, answers to the above is not what I'm after today. Today I am wondering what's the deal with the melting arctic and if the arctic melts then how's the theory going to work out? Fishermen sailing to the green lands of mammoths?

Now there was a writer, from the 50s or 60s -his name I forget, sorry - I read about his theory/story in either a John Keel or W. Raymond Drake book on the unknown, who was very "big" on the Subterranean Civilization/species idea.

He called them "Dero" and said they're responsible for a lot of mining accidents and the legend of Dwarfs and the Fair Folk.

I found it nicely chilling in a H.P. Lovecraft sort of way.

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Well the whole point of this sidetrack is that @nighthawk was not proposing an argument. He was just sharing the little bit of findings he had and giving them context without bias.

No harm no foul, move on. Ignore it.

He was proposing an argument, just not a very well thought-out, well-supported, or well-presented one. His thinking may be sufficiently indolent not even he understands that, but as I said before, not everyone thinks that's a good thing. The worst-case scenario is that he sees these reactions, gets a jolt, and says, "Gosh, I should be aware of how I present my thoughts to others /in a public discussion forum/."

--Jaylemurph

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Just a little information, even if you had the moneyand the resources to go to the north or south pole, you won't be allow to travel on less you are on a us govt access roster that been approve by the canada or us govt. Believe me i tried

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So does anyone have any data on the season pattern of ice cap melting and reforming... concerning historical data and legth of open periods versus closed periods?

A bit of today yearly average and some highlight on the lates years.

Pleistocene temperature and ice volume variations up to present:

Pleistocene_temp_change_graph.gif

There doesn't seem to be any room for humans to have ever see an ice free Arctic ocean, but Canadian geese might have.

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