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Abramelin

Oera Linda Book and the Great Flood [Part 3]

1,291 posts in this topic

FromFinland pointed out the possible significance of the Finnish Kalevala / Sampo story. Indeed I think it is an important source for comparing. More about that later. Here is one detail that supports the idea of winds in bags as mentioned in the previous posts. From Sampo film (1959), part 2/6, 6:15 min.

windbuidels.jpg

Edited by Ott

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Back in 2011 here was much talk on word vit and if it had something to do with Vikings. Otharus brought up the case of sea-kings:

Quote

Another clue I found that Viking is derived from Vitking meaning (primarily) Seaking:

The origins of the Rus' Khaganate are unclear. The first Scandinavian settlers of the region arrived in the lower basin of the Volkhov River in the mid-8th century. The country comprising the present-day Saint-Petersburg, Novgorod, Tver, Yaroslavl, and Smolensk regions became known in Old Norse sources as "Gardarike", the land of forts. Norse warlords, known to the Turkic-speaking steppe peoples as "köl-beki" or "sea-kings", came to dominate some of the region's Finno-Ugric and Slavic peoples, particularly along the Volga trade route linking the Baltic Sea with the Caspian Sea and Serkland.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volga_Vikings

If Norse warlords in another language were known as "sea-kings", then why not in their own, or that of their ancestors, as made plausible by OLB?

In the original 20th chapter of the Oera Linda book the word is presented as follows:

"The Witkoning—that is, the Sea-king Godfried the Old"

"Ther Witkêning thæt is Sêkêning, Godfrêiath thene alda".

Did you notice this chap - pay close attention to what he says and does with his fingers:

modern English: "We two kings"

Finland Swedish:  vi två konungarna/kungarna

Oera Linda book: Witkêning.

I have myself read of that same idea presented about the Sven and Dan, so we can be sure it's not just random gestures of one presenter. The source in question is full of dogmatic sayings and proverbs, for many of which I have myself succesfully found counterparts from other Norse or old European sources. So we shoud not be surprised that the Norse variation too has an element of Viking combined with specifically two sons: in Þorsteins saga Víkingssonar a giant warrior called Viking has many sons, of which only two survive to continue the saga.

And if you have any doubt whether this really is another retelling of the same Finland Swedish story, note that in Viking's tale both his ancestor grandfather Loge and ally Ægir are of the royal house of the Finnish Hrimthyrsar, making Viking in turn a desdendant of Loge/Logi branch of Finnish kings of Gotland and Finland; just like the two Viking brothers Sven and Dan are represented as two descendants of a Finnish ruler at Gotland island. Norse sources make other Kari branch descendants of Finnish dynasty especifically sea kings: Gorr the sea king, Beiti the sea king, Heiti the sea king and Meiti the sea king

If a Nordic myth with a core consisting of specific markers Finns/Æsir - Vikings - number two - sea kings has survived to us in two separate sources, could the Oera Linda book contain a cultural reference to such myth? I think I have already established in this thread and elsewhere that Oera Linda book definitely belongs to the category of Nordic literary based on legends, names and proverbs. Asega-Æsir, 7 foot tall giants, white maidens, explicit mention of brains, writing system derived from the sun, 7 islands together with Valhalla/Walhallagara etc. are some of the more significant parallels linking Bock saga and Oera Linda book – a reference to Viking etymology would be a minor addition to that larger pattern.

- - - - - - - - - - 

And just when I thought I was done with this subject, lo and behold, I found from that saga a description of a wind bag for Ott:

"Now I will tell you, continued Ogautan, that I have a belg (skin-bag) called the weather-belg. If I shake it, storm and wind will blow out of it, together with such biting frost and cold that within three nights the lake shall be covered with so strong an ice that you may cross it on horseback if you wish. Said Jokul: Really you are a man of great cunning; and this is the only way of reaching the holm, for there are no ships before you get to the sea, and nobody can carry them so far. Hereupon Ogautan took his belg and shook it, and out of it there came so fearful a snowstorm and such biting frost that nobody could be out of doors. This was a thing of great wonder to all; and after three nights every water and fjord was frozen." (English translationOriginal, chapter XI).

Edited by FromFinland
Edited for clarity.
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9 hours ago, FromFinland said:

...

Oera Linda book: Witkêning.

...

Þorsteins saga Víkingssonar

...

This is great FF, I will add it to my blog post about Windbags. Fascinating how such a subtle detail can become clear after almost 150 years. And there are so many examples like this. Imagine what would be discovered if a team of specialists would seriously start investigating the OLB!

Important to note that WITKÉNING in OLB is also spelled WITKING and WÉTKING. (see here, point 3)

I would also like to add what I wrote 26-3-2011 (I think the ancients loved it when words could be explained in many different ways):

Quote

1. the first meaning of WIT = white (dutch: wit, german: weiss)
[examples p.9/19: "FRYA. WAS WIT LIK SNÉI" = Frya was white like snow
p.96/2: "NAVT MITH PÀRLUM. HWAND HJRA TUSKAR SEND WITTER"
p.125/24: "BLÁWA ÁGON MITH WIT HÉR"
p.157/16: "RÁDA BRUNA ÀND WITA (...) BITON HJARA HÉRE MITH SJALKWÉTER WIT"
p.206/19: "WITTE WYVA ÀND ULDERMANKES"]

2. in the combination WITSKIP, it has an association with knowing or seeing; with wit or wisdom (dutch: wetenschap or wijsheid, german: wissenshaft or weissheit)
[example p.4/10: "TACH IS HJA FOL WITSKIP ÀND KLARSYAN"]
But it is also used seperate in the meaning of knowledge.
[p.62/25: "MIN.ERVA NÉDE THÉR NÉN WIT FON"; dutch: "Minerva had daar geen weet van"]
Now WIT has become ambiguos: white and wit (wise)

3. in the combination WITKENING or WITKING, it has become even more ambiguous (more associations):
Dutch: witkoning (white-king), weetkoning (wise-king), weterkoning (water-king)
German: weisskonig (white-king AND wise-king!), wasserkonig (waterking)
English: whiteking, witking, wetking
Through the context in which the word WITKENING and WITKING is used, it becomes clear that although he may have been white and wise (the original meanings), most important was that he was commander (king) of the fleet, whether is was a warfleet or a trading fleet. Therefore, WITKING became synonymus with SEEKING.
Best example: p.45/17: "THER WITKÉNING. THÀT IS SÉKÉNING"

Now think of the latin word VIDERE = to see or to know (video = I see). The root is: VID.

VIDKING = SEEKING = SEAKING

Do you know when Þorsteins saga Víkingssonar was first written down? It is not on the wiki.

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2 hours ago, Ott said:

Do you know when Þorsteins saga Víkingssonar was first written down? It is not on the wiki.

According to Rasmus Anderson, it "dates from the fourteenth century, and represents an average tale of the medieval North."

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In Dutch Oera Linda book a distinctively Finnish Magy conquers Scandinavia and is himself defeated by one Wodin, who is implicitly an As for there are elsewhere straight references into Æsir as well (Wodin's brothers, Asegaboek, Asega-Asker).

In Norse Snorri Sturluson's Ynglingasaga the Swedish king Gylfi is conquered by Odin, who is originally an Asian As from beyond Russia, somewhere from the area of modern Turkey and Black Sea. Lands of the Vanir lie north of Black Sea, or in southern areas of Russia ("Venäjä" in modern Finnish). In Norse Gylfaginning the same Gylfi is a king of Sweden and wanders to somewhere completely different place to visit Asgard and have a dialogue with Æsir, suggesting that Asgard does not lie in the Sweden or Scandinavia. 

In Finland Swedish Bock saga all the Finns are Vanir, expect those of southern Finland who constitute the Æsir and therein lies also their Asgård at the center of their holy land, which is in turn named all over after Oden.

This all made me to wonder: who is right, who is wrong? Should we trust the oldest record, or the ones that predicted succesfully archeological findings? Is Gylfi Swedish or Finnish, and to lesser extent, why would he fight as a Finn against Odin the As if the Æsir were Finns to begin with?

Turns out there is a 18th century source that could make some sense of this mess. Finnish priest and folklore collector Kristfrid Ganander (1741-1790) collected a wide variety of folk tales, poems, Norse legends and academic opinion on all things ancient Finland in his 1789 book Mythologia Fennica, with some the information thereing being unique i. e. they have not survived anywhere else. He wrote, my translation:

"Gylpho,

king of Sweden, but Finn by his birth, for he was grandson of Finland's king Ferniot; Loccenius hist. Sv. Lib. I p. 2." [Ferniot = Fornjot]

"Sons of Kalewa

[...]

At the time of Ingiald Ostrobothnia was ruled by giant Calewas, Califas, perhaps of that Scandinavian aristocrat Gylfe's family, whose name is retained at that district by the way of heirs. (Dalin.)"

Ganander's sources were thus at least partially German Johannes Loccenius' works on Swedish history and Swedish Olof von Dalin's Svea rikes historia from 1747. Unfortunately I can't find an online copy of Locceniu's work, but did find copy of Dalin's work (1, 2). Page 423:

Quote

In Ingiald Illrådes' time in Ostrobothnia there was giant Kalevas, Kalifas from old Scandinacian ruler Gylfe's family (***), by which comes the name. Kaleva has twelve son's of which tree built castles at Ostrobothnia (n) and had other things (†).

Part (n) then lists some of the son's names: Soini (Sogni), Hiisi (Hisi) of which the first survives as surname in modern Finland (our current foreign minister has that surname). The story is attested in legends about son's of Kaleva (1). 

Now, there are plenty of Norse sagas where not only one tribe but also a one family itself wages civil war to see who of the siblings retains the land (for example: 1 amazon Rusla, 2 chapter 23). Finnish poems about the civil war between tribes of Untamo (Väinämöinen et al) and Kalervo (Kullervo, Kaleva) retains this aspect, too (1). Thus we note that Oera Linda book is not the only source to make make Magy-Gylfi a Finn, but character of Gylfi was connected directly to ruling Finnish dynasties by at least two 18th century sources, one Swedish and one Finnish and also likely by third 17th century German source. Of these the Finnish source, Kristrid Ganander, stands out for he claims some of the Æsir to have been living in southern Finland. Heimdaller, for example he tells to have been a priest of wisdom who dwelled in manor of Island near modern Turku. The Finnish word for "authority", esivalta, is said to refer to Æsir. This is echoed very strongly by the later Bock saga, though minor details differ as often is the case with regional variants of myths.

Edited by FromFinland
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- Thêr hêrdon hja mith lustum nêi tha vrdwâlska finna sâgum, thrvchdam hja thjvd ænd nêi wêron. Sâ send hja vntfryast vnthônkes thene wald hjarar aldrum.

- There they learned listened with pleasure the loose ways the saga of the Finns, because they were bad and new; and thus they became denationalised in spite of the efforts of their parents.

 

I wonder what Finnish saga/stories?

The ones told by the Magy about Wodin taken up among their gods, which Fryans laughed about in the beginning (1500 years earlier)?

 

- Thene Mâgy sêide that-er mong hjara godon vpnimeth wêre, ænd that hi fon thêr over hjam welda, men vs folk lakton vmbe tin tâl.

- The Magy said that he was taken up by their gods and still reigned over us, but our people laughed at what they said.

 

When one connects above quotations in that light, after approx 1500 years the laughing drained totally and the cultural invasion of such saga was pointed out by Adela as one of the main initiators of the cultural decline. Together with the taking of Finda's 'willfully' prisoner/slaves into serfdom of the nobles (even marriage) and abduction/spoiling of youth.  In other words : a rather invisible cancer than plain conquest.  A moral decline by some still seen in the present world (eg capitalism swinging to plain materialism-consumism,Bholly Wood like representation of events).  

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3 hours ago, Van Gorp said:

- Thêr hêrdon hja mith lustum nêi tha vrdwâlska finna sâgum, thrvchdam hja thjvd ænd nêi wêron. Sâ send hja vntfryast vnthônkes thene wald hjarar aldrum.

- There they learned listened with pleasure the loose ways the saga of the Finns, because they were bad and new; and thus they became denationalised in spite of the efforts of their parents.

 

I wonder what Finnish saga/stories?

The ones told by the Magy about Wodin taken up among their gods, which Fryans laughed about in the beginning (1500 years earlier)?

 

- Thene Mâgy sêide that-er mong hjara godon vpnimeth wêre, ænd that hi fon thêr over hjam welda, men vs folk lakton vmbe tin tâl.

- The Magy said that he was taken up by their gods and still reigned over us, but our people laughed at what they said.

 

When one connects above quotations in that light, after approx 1500 years the laughing drained totally and the cultural invasion of such saga was pointed out by Adela as one of the main initiators of the cultural decline. Together with the taking of Finda's 'willfully' prisoner/slaves into serfdom of the nobles (even marriage) and abduction/spoiling of youth.  In other words : a rather invisible cancer than plain conquest.  A moral decline by some still seen in the present world (eg capitalism swinging to plain materialism-consumism,Bholly Wood like representation of events).  

Good catch, Van Gorp! 

In the part immediately following that description, these is talk of children being taken to "uplands" or "vpsalândum", which I believe refers to Uppsala, capitol of pagan Sweden. As for the saga or stories, I would like to know if the murder of mother by Magy mentioned in the beginning refers to the mother Frana. If yes, the story or saga could have something to do with the story stealing of Sampo, or Sammon ryöstö in Finnish. It's known from both Finnish and Norse sources (The Saga of Bosi and Herraud and Grottasöngr) and Oera Linda book seems to contain a variant in chapters 31-32, with Finnish Magy = Väinämöinen et al, Frisian Mother = Akka/Louhi, Lamp = Sampo/MacGuffin. See illustration here.  

The Oera Linda book variant of the story is very realistic and dark, Finnish and Norse ones have high fantasy elements in them.

 

 

Edited by FromFinland

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I agree FromFinland, i also think of the Swedish Uppsala.  About the temple of Uppsala, Adam Von Bremen (for what it is worth, but he does mention it) describes it as adorned with gold: striking with the OLB description of Magyars as having/dealing with gold in a high degree.

Striking also what you mention about Frana.  For me it helps sometimes to take my own made timeline of most OLB events and there I equated Frana with the murdered folksmoder who is mentionned in the first quotes of “The book of Adela’s followers”.

And here it all begins to become very interesting about the bigger chronology of the Finda’s/Magy’s takeover of (roughly) the Scandinavian area’s (and/or the so called Eastern states).  One could conclude that between the initial ‘invasion’ and the loss of Denmark lies a 1500 years period.

1500 years between the initial will of the Magy to trade and buy iron weapons for gold (but blocked by the moder), and the effective success to do so.  This is a big span, certainly when the 2 stories seamless fit each other like it could be interpreted as 2 more or less close sequential descriptions of the same big event.

It wouldn’t be the first time a substantial misinterpretation slips along more or less assembled historical narrations.

I admit this is just an assumption yet, but i think worth to consider.  Repercussions also in the total timespan of Atlant sinking and the way our forefathers (edit: and -mothers of course) kept track with time.

I hold for possible that lunar and solar cycle countings could be mixed up somewhere in the logging and interpretation by later persons.

 

The info you provide on the mentionned sagas all this thread, I find of the utmost interest.  As I am not acquainted with them at all, it is all new for me and takes some time to delve in further, what I certainly do.  It gives me a much wider perspective to place OLB: thnx for that.

Edited by Van Gorp
rectification of gender discrimination ;-)

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New video about a REAL subterranean hallway - discovered in Finland 1987, due to the description of the local Bock-Saga:
 

 

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Boreas, I sent you a private message, please check your messages from the top right corner (letter symbol) to view it.

Edited by FromFinland2

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does it also make a case for buddha (purse ) being considered a windbag , or an empty boaster.....

windbag also brings to mind a set of bellows....would have been an important device to increase the heat for extracting metal ...maybe aeolus gave Ulysses the bellows for increasing the heat in a kiln

Edited by Passing Time

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Welcome Boreas, to join our discussion on Oera Linda book. We have discussed here quite a few old non-Dutch sources to use for comparison research, with largely Germanic and Nordic emphasis for the last year or so. Namely, the Irminsaga and Bock saga, with few Norse sagas, such as Ynglinga saga,thrown in to the mix. So far it seems that Oera Linda book belongs to the category of Nordic literature for it not only the happening reported in other sources but also echoes the themes and language of other sources. This has large bearing on the question if Oera Linda book itself is genuine or not. While most of the various sources would have been available to theoretical 19th century forgers in Holland, some weren't. Thus one could see that Dutchmen might take keen interest on the archeological question of Balder's temple of southern Finland, with Finns ought to take equally strong interest in chemical analysis of Oera Linda manuscript of Holland. As you may be aware, Oera Linda book details both Dutch and Finns vying for European supremacy in the nowadays largely forgotten prehistory, with both peoples diminishing to back stage periphery by the middle of the Middle Ages, when nations like England, France, Holy Roman Empire, Sweden and Russia rise to wield major geopolitical power.

While my input has been largely Nordic, we occasionally delve to other source like British sources (1, 2) for the British isles lie so close to the Frisian coastline. Indeed, Oera Linda book might not just be viewed from the native Dutch and Nordic Finnish viewpoints, but also from Celtic and British viewpoint. Finally, as Oera Linda book mentions Slavs, perhaps Book of Veles of uncertain origins might give one viewpoint too, with thanks going to other UM writers for translation (3).

 

 

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On 11/7/2016 at 2:51 PM, Van Gorp said:

striking with the OLB description of Magyars as having/dealing with gold in a high degree.

Van Gorp, your remark found an another literary clue! Lets see how Oera Linda book describes relationships between the Finnish rulers and material wealth in the form of gold, utilising the Sandbach translation:

"promised them “red cows with golden horns”

"Magyars sought our friendship [...] they would willingly have exchanged for their gold and silver ornaments"

"Magy had become master of the east part of Scandinavia. [...] in exchange for gold ornaments, as well as for copper and iron-ore."

"Magy became master. [...]  his mouth was shut by golden chains."

Notice how the Finnic gold is always mentioned as being something refined, not just an gold ore or bulk pieces of gold as cast in bars, beams, quills and coins. We'll take a look on the Finland Swedish and Finnish views.

"to the court of Æsir were given aesthetics. [...] Aesthetic means that the item is eternal: the item is so beautiful, that no one wants to destroy it. Seppo [Ärs in Finland Swedish] and Maija [Mai in Finland Swedish] represented the aesthetics, estetiken. Words Ärs, Mai and estetik formed the expression "Ärs Majestet", Your Majesty, which was a honorary title of Seppo and Maija at the paradise time. In addition to title "Ärs Majestet" the king and queen were called by title "Ärs Höghet", Your Highness.

Vanir made the aesthetics out of gold. In paradise time Oden [sun] was represented by five elements [...] and gold, which reflected the sun rays. [...] Gold was best metal for shaping and one could make the most beautiful items out of it, or aesthetics. [...] Each generation of each ring land [Vanir lands] manufactured one gift, to be offered to Seppo and Maija. A governor came from his ring land to Hel and brought with him the offering gift. [...] When Old Man passed away, all the items brought to the castle in his time were taken to storage room, or lagärrummet, which was mined in granite mountain called Siboberget; aesthetics were thus taken in the end to the storage rooms of Kyypeli-mountain beneath the temple of Lemminkäinen [Balder's temple in Finland Swedish]." 

"Due to events in Rosland [Russia] the Æsir of Uudenmaa closed the temple of Lemminkäinen in 987 [A.D.]: it was told that the entrance to temple was closed with stone blocks, or blockerad med stenskivor. Outside the temple were left three golden buck statues, which were showcased in wagons pulled by eight real bucks."

"one speaks of ring of Oden, it used to be also a motif for jewelry. There were three kinds of rings; ear ring, wrist ring and finger ring, which heathens kept in left ear, at left hand's wrist and finger. Men wore rings, women jewelry."

Source: Ior Bock, Bockin perheen saaga, 1996. Pages 47-48, 74, 79.

Let's read some Finnish heathen poetry, as sung allegedly by our chief magi Väinämöinen himself:

"Oi Ukko yli Jumala,                 Oh Old Man the supreme God,
Vaari vanha taivahainen,         old grandfather the heavenly,
Ukko kultanen kuningas!         Old Man the golden king!
" (SKVR I1, 64)

Part of an another poem one recites in order to became a proper witch (1, 2)

"Tässä on kullat kullistasi,      Here are the gold of your golds
Hopeoistasi hopeat,               the silvers of your silvers 
Että kullassa kävisit,              so that you would walk wearing gold
Hopeassa hoil⌈a⌉vaisit.         hollered in silver. 
5 Metsän hippa halliparta,     the quick greybeard of forest 
Metsän kultainen kuningas,  the golden king of the forest,
" (SKVR XII1, 3507)

There exists an archaic Finnish saying "to go by clanking in gold, rattling in silver", which can be read from hundred of old Finnish poems collected.  I don't think this all is necessary coincidental regarding the language used, for many other sayings and themes in Oera Linda book do not seem the be random, either (Æsir of Asega-Askar, Asegaboek; white women; brains; writing letters like sun; et cetera).

Edited by FromFinland2
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I have neglected this thread for some time and regret to still neglect it.

'White and wise' are characteristics of Saint Nicholas.

The white rhinoceros actually originally was called 'wide lip rhinoceros' by the Dutch in South Africa. When the English got to rule there, they misunderstood the word 'wide' for 'white'.

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Finally I got the question of the Oera Linda Alphabet into the relevant context:

1. Oldest known 'sign-system' (symbol-language/proto-alphabet):
http://www.ancient-wisdom.com/writingorigin.htm

2. Oldest known "ideograms" (heraldry):
http://siberiantimes.com/PICTURES/SCIENCE/Shigir-idol/inside_shigir_idol_drawing.jpg[/img]
http://siberiantimes.com/science/casestudy/features/is-this-the-worlds-oldest-secret-code/


3. Oldest post-glacial alphabet:
http://www.omniglot.com/images/writing/vinca2.gif


Europes earliest pottery is from the lower Volga - dated to the second half of the 7th millennium BC. So far, the oldest ceramics (Sereteya) is found in the Djepr-Lovat region, dated 9.450-9.150 BP. Similar ceramics of similar age is found at the lower plateu of the Volga-Don.

In the southern part of Lake Ladoga Sperring ceramics has been found at Ust-Ribezhna, dated ca. 8.800 BP. Here we also find the first asbestos-ceramics, dated 6.600-5.900 BP. In a younger layer, dated 4.000-4.500 years BP, the first bronze appear at this site.

The oldest pottery found in Western Europe is the Ertebolle ceramic, found in eastern Denmark about 8.200 cal BP. During the comming millemium this pottery evolves in quality and style - as it spread along with cattle-farming and copper-melting - into the east-european Corded Ware, the nordic Funnel Beaker, the western Bell Beaker and Mediterranean Cordial Ware/Stroke-Ware.

Simultaniously, from dna-test of neolithic Eurasia, we see an overlapping spread of two dynastical brother-lines, of y-dna R1b and R1a, that spread and multiplied as cattle-farmers to become dominant thoughout Eurasia - from Iberia to Siberia. The older societies, relying on gathering, goat- and sheep-herding, were basically y-dna I in the north, G in the south-west, J in the near south-east and H in the far south-east (India). All of them descendants from a common, arctic ancestor, identified by y-dna F* - who survived the end of ice-time in NW Europe...

As stone-age turns into metal- and bronze-age the stonemasons and potmakers from the flint- and clay-rich areas of Scania and Denmark (with y-dna I and R1b) still keeps creating the finest works of flint and pottery found in neolitic Eurasia.

https://da.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skarpsallingkarret

Remarkably, as new braches of the old dynasties spread and the styles of pottery alters - from Indus to Iberia - the potters of nelithic and bronze-age Eurasia continue to decorate their ceramics with the very same basic symbol-elements as was carved into the «Holy-Three-Men-In-One" - known as the 11.000 years old "Shigir-idol" (above).


4. Oldest known (heraldic) alphabets:
http://www.prehistory.it/ftp/winn.htm
http://www.omniglot.com/writing/vinca.htm

5. Oldst known logograms (refined heraldry):
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dispilio_Tablet#/media/File:Dispilio_signs.jpg
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proto-writing

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vinča_symbols

6. Oldest known syllabels (combination-sounds, "Asian alphabets")
http://www.omniglot.com/writing/semanto-phonetic.php
http://www.omniglot.com/writing/syllabic.htm

7. Oldst known, grand circle of human sounds (sun-circle, sun-cross, sun-wheel):
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sun_cross

8. Oldest known "phonograms" ('true letters', cyclic alphabet):

https://no.pinterest.com/pin/362117626270372161/
https://no.pinterest.com/pin/374572893985940244/

9. Eurasian "runes" - various phonetic alphabeths:
http://s6.photobucket.com/user/Abramelinn/media/OLB/VanGorp2.jpg.html
http://www.omniglot.com/writing/alphabets.htm

10. Analyzis: Old European script vs. runes vs. etruscan letters:
https://aleximreh.wordpress.com/2011/01/05/similarity-between-vinca-hungarian-runic-signs-and-signs-found-inside-the-bosnian-pyramids-older-than-egypt-pyramids/

Gudanaz.png

Post-ice-age migrational patterns:
http://impactsurvivors.com/summaries.html

Ston-Age Mythology:
http://www.archaeomythology.org/about-the-institute-of-archaeomythology/

Connecting the dots, filling the gaps, completing the cycles...
http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/forum/topic/283001-oera-linda-book-and-the-great-flood-part-3/?page=49#comment-5929431

:

Edited by Boreas
editing
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On 14.12.2016 at 1:43 PM, FromFinland2 said:

did you guys notice this artist's work?

I don't understand why he used 8- instead of 6-spoke wheel, and would never apply it myself.

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If the wheel only have six spokes, does that mean their week was only 6 days long?

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On 30-1-2017 at 6:59 AM, americanaryan said:

If the wheel only have six spokes, does that mean their week was only 6 days long?

Interesting to mention.

For sure with a 10-week 'month' of 60 days, and a 6-month year of 60 weeks that seems plausible.

It all adds up to the 360-day year (360° degrees of a circle), and those 5 extra days where many calender makers were playing with.

It seems more neat than the present non-fitting way weeks are related with months and years.

For the remaining 5 days:

Does nature really need to 'rest' 52 times after a 6-day period (where nothing as such can be naturally regarded as a fullfilled creation in that period) in order to fullfil the BIG creation/circle everybody recognises by the sun?

Maybe nature (or God if one wills) only needs to rest not more than 5 days after 360 days of continuous end-to-end creation, when the job is done :-)

Not surprising that that 5 day period could fall between 21st dec (when the sun cycle comes to an end) and 25th december where people for the first time could spot the effects of the reversing path with their naked eye, remaining 360 days between the 'start' (birth of the sun) on 25 december and the fullfilment of the end around 21st december .

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The Frisians had a 7-day week.

"Near the southern mouth of the Rhine and the Scheldt there are seven islands, named after Frya’s seven virgins of the week."

http://oeralinda.webs.com/oera-linda-book#26

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Some of my ongoing OLB research can be found on the following page of my website:

http://oeralinda.webs.com/maidens-citadels-yule

This includes a short film clip from the 1930s of maidens taking part in a ceremony inspired by the OLB, an analysis of their daily routine based on the OLB itself and later attemps at revival, a reconstruction of the ancient Frisian calendar and its six annual festivals, illustrations of archaeological discoveries, an explanation of how the foddik was lit, a brief overview of my finds concerning Wewelsburg, and information about the revived order, established in 1936.

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On 2-2-2017 at 2:41 PM, Tony S. said:

The Frisians had a 7-day week.

"Near the southern mouth of the Rhine and the Scheldt there are seven islands, named after Frya’s seven virgins of the week."

http://oeralinda.webs.com/oera-linda-book#26

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

That's indeed curious when using a wheel for time measuring.

Pondering further on the subject ...

With the wheel you come quite naturally on a 360 days a year, with the 5 extra days at the turning point.

Reckening the 360 days and six spokes the 10 weeks per spoke (60 days spoke): the six days week seems inevitable.

Though it seems quite clear as you refer too, they also used a 7 days week with the names of Fryas sjvgum wâkfâmkes (cfr 'vestal' virgins).

And here you have also the issue of the Vestal virgins numbering six or seven (and when).

I think in the case of Vestal Virgins and OLB, the question is not whether it be 6 or seven, it seems to be connected and used in parallel.

The seven days week seem to be a more conventional, civil and continous segmentation of the 360+5 day cycle, then the 6 day week which is more the natural one of fullfillment but gives a last irregular and non-sheduled week.

Both to be used depending civil or natural application.

Bridging the gap of the 'unsheduled'  irregular 5day turning period, there was created an extra day after the natural 6-day week.

Reducing the number of weeks from 60 to 52 (plus1day).

That extra weekly day where God did not work (an ultimate artificial and free day compared to the natural 6day period of the weel ) could be original Friday (Saturday as the first day of the week, because the seed is sown.  Hence Vrij-Dag (Fry-Day, Friday), as the ultimate day of non-creation (non-existince referred to the natural week).

This extra conceptual day corresponds with the physionomy of the circle with any diameter that can naturally be enlarged of always six other circles on the circumstance with just the same diameter (cfr flower of life).  So the six form the seventh or are sprouted of (alpaha-omega), on a higher level. The alpha (Saturday) is the omega (Friday) but then teared apart in the seven day week, compared with the natural six day week.

Attached a picture where I tried to superimpose the sevenday week on the sixday week (and reverse).

Imo this rather logical picture shows clearly why the 'week' is called 'week'.  Because the meaning is not just a recurring period, but one that has an accumulating off-set of one day compared to the natural 6-day period.  In Dutch: 'de week wijkt af'  from the natural division.

It forms an offset with the natural period, or in other words the natural period 'gives way' to the extra day which forms the offset.

I really do think that is the meaning of the word week (give way, or form an offset with). 

One can find this also at the usage of the same word 'wêk' in OLB in a different context.

nv is düged fon ut hjara midden wêken

week offset.png

 

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The OLB mentions 7, or its multiples, quite a lot. In addition to the 7 virgins of the week, already mentioned, 7 maidens were always in attendance at every foddik, and each burch had 21 maidens, plus 7 apprentices. There were said to be 7 islands in the Scheldt. Frya appeared to Fasta 7 times 7 years after the latter's appointment as Folk Mother, and Frya had given laws to her descendants after they reached the 7th generation. Each burch had 7 civilians, 7 warriors and 7 seamen as councilors. The Folk Mother had 7 messengers. A youth had to wait 7 years before having the full franchise. If he spent 3 years in office, a king had to wait 7 years before becoming re-eligible for election. Adela was said to be 7 feet tall, as, indeed, was King Black Adel. And these are just the more obvious examples.

By contrast, 6 is hardly mentioned at all. The burch towers had 6 sides, as one would expect, since they conform to the shape of the jol. And the jol itself, of course, was clearly a very important, and sacred, symbol. It seems, among other things, to have formed the basis of their calendar, so we should imagine 12 months of 30 days each, with 6 extra days evenly spaced throughout, as festivals. This is the same as saying alternating months of 31 and 30 days, since, other than Jol-fêrste, the festivals appear to have been named after the months that succeed them. (" Fifteen months after the last general assembly, at the festival of the harvest month, everybody gave himself up to pleasure and merry-making, and no one thought of anything but diversion; but Wr-alda wished to teach us that watchfulness should never be relaxed.") We also have to assume that since this gives a year of 366 days, one of the days was removed in approximately 3 out of 4 years. But basically, the OLB only gives us hints. In terms of multiples, or fractions, of 6, the day had 24 hours, and a watch was 3 hours.

What can be made of this? Clearly, both 6 and 7 were important, but perhaps, as you say, 6 was a more sacred number, and so was used less often for general matters.

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On 3-2-2017 at 5:30 PM, Tony S. said:

... a short film clip from the 1930s of maidens taking part in a ceremony inspired by the OLB...

What is the source of that short fragment and how do you know it was inspired by the OLB?

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