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The Man On Da Moon

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Hi,

I am new to the forum, and I probably won't start coming to this post room on a regular basis, but I'd likle to make a few statements and see what you guys think.

The young president issued the challenge in May 1961: To put an American on the moon and return him safely by the end of the decade. John F. Kennedy did not live to see his dream become reality; it would be left to one of his political rivals to congratulate the first two humans on the moon. But politics seemed far from anyone's mind as the world watched Neil Armstrong step onto the lunar surface on July 20, 1969. His words seemed to say it all: "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." This special site recalls those first steps, 30 years ago.

The moon isn't just in the sky. It's just about everywhere we look, although we may not realize it. That buttery croissant you might have eaten for breakfast was originally a Gallic communion cake inspired by the crescent moon; princesses and the girl next door have been named after the goddess identified with a phase of the moon. We've all heard about how the moon is made of green cheese, or that strange little men live upon it; but how many of us knew that the maiden name of Buzz Aldrin's maternal grandmother was "Moon," or remembered that men brought back 47.7 pounds of the moon on that first mission 30 years ago?

All my life I have been fascinated by the moon. I hope, and would love to hear the opinions of the other guests and members of this group. :)

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Hi,

Welcome to the Forum, and, the moon is one of the best parts of our universe, it is the only thing that you can see very clearly without any machinery (Try to look into the  sun and you know what I mean). I have heard that the moon was a piece of earth that was separated from the earth in the early years of Earth, is this the truth??

Odin Supreme  8)

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The leading theory is that a Mars-sized body once hit Earth and the resulting debris (from both Earth and the impacting body) accumulated to form the Moon. Whatever the origin, we know the Moon was formed over 4.5 billion years ago (the age of the oldest collected lunar rocks). But that is unfortunetly one of the few theories scientists have made.

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Thanx for the reply! My knowledge has grown.  ;D

Odin Supreme  8)

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  Hi Pakoda, Welcome to the board.  

 I got a telescope this summer, and I am still fascinated to see the craters on the moon. To think, it was such a big deal getting to the moon, in the early days of the space race.  Now we're looking at Mars.

     NORA

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Hello,

 I don't know much about the moon, but I have a really nice telescope too.  I have only taken it out of the box and put it together once, but I did see the moon with it, and it was so close, I could see all the craters, and everything with it. It was very exciting. :D

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Hi Pakoda  :D

Just wondering what happens to you in a full moon?

No history of lycanthropy in the family?

;D

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Well, I've been my usual self --last time I checked. But my uncle HAS been acting strangely lately, a bit... wolfy!  :o

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Awhooooooooooooooo (howl)

Odin Supreme  8)

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You guys need neutering.... ;D

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Say What?  ;D

Odin Supreme  8)

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It seems to me, that we have been rolling off of many of the topics!!  :-*

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Well, from the looks of previous topics, you're absolutely right. There I go again...  ::)

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Sorry for the "rolling of topics".

Odin Supreme  8)

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The moon is an attractive place to launch rockets from into deep space. Because of the gravity being 6 times smaller than Earth's gravity. But is there water in the Moon's core, and how much?

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Yes there's water on the moon.

The $63 million Lunar Prospector spacecraft that was launched January 6, found water on the moon, March 6, the same year. NASA who confirmed the news at 10 pm estimate somewhere between 2,6 billion and 80 billion gallons of frozen water on the moon, which equals about 11 million and 330 million tons.

The cataclysmic collision that created the moon out of the Earth boiled off every drop of moisture that might have been there. So how did the water get there? Over millions of years, comets, which are essentially dirty snowballs, crashed into the moon, bringing water there. But in most places, the water has long since evaporated away, only near the poles, where temperatures can dip to minus 270 degrees Fahrenheit.

:o

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The question was is there water in the moon's core. Most scientists agree that the moon's core is made up mostly of iron, like earth's core. However, as Dakoda pointed out, there is water on the surface in the form of ice. Most scientist's aren't in agreement as to the amount of water.

The north and south poles of the Moon may contain up to six billion metric tons of water ice, a more than ten-fold increase over previous estimates, according to scientists working with data from NASA's Lunar Prospector mission. Growing evidence now suggests that water ice deposits of relatively high concentration are trapped beneath the soil in the permanently shadowed craters of both lunar polar regions. The researchers believe that alternative explanations, such as concentrations of hydrogen from the solar wind, are unlikely.

Homer[glow=color,strength,width]

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