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Asteroid narrowly avoids striking the Earth

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I'll have to check the house insurance, something like that could make a right mess of the roof.

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Posted (edited)

Again ?  I thought the end all / consensus last time on this was that they can see everything ? and now I can't recall the name of that system NATURALLY !  Just came from another thread, how about Improving Aerial Security ? yeah that was a joke.

Edited by MWoo7
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Okay, so that image is very misleading, that or it adds a lot of confusion because the distance between the MOON and EARTH is so big that you can fit every planet in our solar system IN that gap. So if this asteroid flew past at the HALFWAY point, how is that 'narrowly avoiding' us?

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27 minutes ago, XClashGames said:

Okay, so that image is very misleading, that or it adds a lot of confusion because the distance between the MOON and EARTH is so big that you can fit every planet in our solar system IN that gap. So if this asteroid flew past at the HALFWAY point, how is that 'narrowly avoiding' us?

For an un recorded astroid of that size and speed it was close

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Just now, Mr.United_Nations said:

For an un recorded astroid of that size and speed it was close

 

Most asteroids are 'unrecorded' they obviously can't spot them as easily as they think they can, which is exactly why every asteroid that comes within a million miles of our planet is automatically called a 'close call'. Its stupid.

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Dang dang...Daaaaaaaaaaaang...small asteroid misses Earth none story shocker!

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2 hours ago, khol said:

how do they come up with odds like this, 0.01% of being hit in next 100 years when we have so many undetected fly by's ?..this one was back in August

http://earthsky.org/space/asteroid-2016-qa2-august-27-28-2016

 

They go by past hits and known numbers of bits of space rock, it is only a prediction and we could be hit at any mo....

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thanks..if this is the case I find odds like this irrelevant then :huh:

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YEah but what about me?

Kidding, ... I seen close call ... HA! was heading to event, at the airport we found out that we had a near miss. Lovely, not the misses I care to run into.

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2 hours ago, Mr.United_Nations said:

For an un recorded astroid of that size and speed it was close

Yes, I agree.  

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3 hours ago, XClashGames said:

 

Most asteroids are 'unrecorded' they obviously can't spot them as easily as they think they can, which is exactly why every asteroid that comes within a million miles of our planet is automatically called a 'close call'. Its stupid.

126K miles is a tiny distance when you're talking about relative velocities in this range. Think of it in terms of time: it missed us by 3.5 hours. 126K miles / 35K mph. Considering the damage it would do if it struck a populated area, I'd say that's close enough to be uncomfortable. Also, we didn't even see it was there until it was on it's way by. 

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Posted (edited)

Next time we wont be so lucky, this was a close one

 

Edited by coolguy
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23 hours ago, MWoo7 said:

Again ?  I thought the end all / consensus last time on this was that they can see everything ? and now I can't recall the name of that system NATURALLY !  Just came from another thread, how about Improving Aerial Security ? yeah that was a joke.

See everything? According to whom?

Note, from the article linked in the OP: "...around the same size as the one that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia back in 2013..." In other words, about the size of a bus. How easy do you think it is to see a grey bus when it's 200,000 kilometres away?

Anyway, if you're worried about it, lobby your political representatives to put more money into asteroid detection programs: they're cheap and the payoff could be enormous.

around the same size as the one that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia back in 2013 - See more at: http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/302591/asteroid-narrowly-avoids-striking-the-earth#sthash.MaDQlDwB.dpuf
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I suppose there's lots of things hurtling around up there we know nothing about. 3.5 hours, eh? Better make sure the insurance is up to date...

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If they don't even detect them until a few days prior,how can the statics of a hit even be correct?

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Yeah, statistics are funny things. Believe it or not, there's actually a better chance of dying from an meteor impact than from a shark bite. This seems absurd because we know that several people die from a shark attacks each year but I've never heard of anyone dying from a meteor impact. The anomaly is because when a meteor strikes, there is a good chance that a lot of people will die at once. So if you combine the likelihood of an impact over a given period of time and the number of people effected you end up with a number ...

I had a stats teacher once give a very animated presentation of solving one of the most terrifying equations I've ever seen on the chalk board (can't remember which now, chi squared maybe?). At the end of his performance he circled the number .035 as the answer and then offered extra credit if anyone could tell him what it meant. After a minute or two of us fumbling for an answer, he held up his hand and announced to the class that in reality, it meant absolutely nothing. A thing had occurred .035 times within the scope of the query up until now. We use stats to plan the likelihood of a thing but there's no guaranty that thing will happen. Ask anyone who's lived in California for long period how much they worry about earthquakes. Most will tell you they hardly ever think about it even though they know it will happen someday.

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Posted (edited)

4 hours ago, Peter B said:
On 1/10/2017 at 5:52 AM, MWoo7 said:

Again ?  I thought the end all / consensus last time on this was that they can see everything ? and now I can't recall the name of that system NATURALLY !  Just came from another thread, how about Improving Aerial Security ? yeah that was a joke.

See everything? According to whom?

Hmmm my satirical propaedeutically prepared propagandistic pros and cons in the art of flatulence wasn't clear. Boo. I was referring to an older post regarding asteroids or or maybe it was near misses and I suppose I could look it up. Not. Yes I should have been clear and concise and stated that the Again was indicating an older post at unexplained mysteries in regards to seeing asteroids before they hit. Duly noted and thanks for bringing that discrepancy to my attention.
Anyhoooozz (big authorative techie term) I thought at the end of it everyone had agreed that with ?(wasn't "Near Earth Object Program") rrr I forget , anywayzzz with a certain system in use now we can see everything well, but only for a short distance and the detection percentage was gaining ground and very high at the time.
(Short distance in relation to astronomer lingo/jargo of distances of objects in space/universe.)

Oh you mentioned me worried about it. HA! just another article / post here at the famous UM SITE!

Edited by MWoo7

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14 hours ago, coolguy said:

Next time we wont be so lucky, this was a close one

Or next time we will be just as lucky.  As for being close...yeah I guess so.  But it still missed by thousands and thousands of miles.  That's not even close when playing horseshoes.

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1 hour ago, Thorvir said:

Or next time we will be just as lucky.  As for being close...yeah I guess so.  But it still missed by thousands and thousands of miles.  That's not even close when playing horseshoes.

Yeah, but that's a pretty big horseshoe! :)

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I wonder how much damage this asteroid, would of done if it hit Earth 

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7 hours ago, MissJatti said:

I wonder how much damage this asteroid, would of done if it hit Earth 

Hard to say exactly because there are so many variables we don't have. Size, angle of attack, composition of the object, etc. The diameter range they gave was roughly 35-100 ft and no info on density or composition.

But at the extreme, a 100 ft dense rock meteor striking land at a 45 degree angle would release around 625 Kilotons of TNT's worth of energy (Hiroshima was about 15 KT). At a 35 ft diameter with the above parameters it would only be around 23 KT. If the rock is more porous, or the angle changes, or it strikes water, etc, the values change. Tunguska is estimated to have been between 200-600 ft but it probably exploded before it hit the ground, possibly because it had a low density. That air burst is estimated to have been in the range of 10 megatons and leveled 770 sq miles of Siberian forest.

So, in both cases, more than Chelyabinsk and less than Tunguska. The damage would be localized and wouldn't have much global effect, but I wouldn't want a front row seat. :)

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7 hours ago, MissJatti said:

I wonder how much damage this asteroid, would of done if it hit Earth 

Impact simulator here.

:yes:

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