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Woolly mammoth 'on the verge of resurrection'

19 posts in this topic

 

Oh great. To cope with cold weather climate..in this Climate change, and ice-melting period ?
It's dead Jim...leave it alone

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Didn't they say that years ago?

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Futurists often predict things, sometimes they come true, time will tell. 

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I'm not comfortable with all this messing with nature...BUT!...I'd love to see one...by the way...winter is coming...

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9 hours ago, seanjo said:

I'm not comfortable with all this messing with nature...BUT!...I'd love to see one.

I feel the same.

 

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I don't get it, it's a hairy elephant? You could stick hair on an elephant today and see the same effect tomorrow. 

There's no point, the mammoth lived and died, let it be. Where's the moral justification for resurrecting one? Is it's ecosystem even still there? I live on the far western tip of what was once the Mammoth Steppe and it's changed, considerably

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1 hour ago, oldrover said:

I don't get it, it's a hairy elephant? You could stick hair on an elephant today and see the same effect tomorrow. 

There's no point, the mammoth lived and died, let it be. Where's the moral justification for resurrecting one? Is it's ecosystem even still there? I live on the far western tip of what was once the Mammoth Steppe and it's changed, considerably

I think it's a little different than sticking some hair on an elephant. 

I agree that an ecosystem may not exist for them anymore.   I don't know if current tundra vegetation exists that would sustain them.  

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On ‎2‎/‎16‎/‎2017 at 2:26 PM, Sundew said:

Futurists often predict things, sometimes they come true, time will tell. 

Or they just keep repeating the prediction every so often so when it does happen they can say "See, I predictedthat!  I'm so good!"

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I heard about this years ago and it was about gene editing a hybrid but the process would take years of editing out the elephant genes from the hybrids born.

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51 minutes ago, White Unicorn said:

I heard about this years ago and it was about gene editing a hybrid but the process would take years of editing out the elephant genes from the hybrids born.

I think, that was the old idea, before they'd recovered the whole genomes of quite a few extinct species. 

As an aside, they now have the complete thylacine genome. It's not been formally published on yet though. I'm not claiming any special insight there, I do have a couple of good connections but I learned that from 'Expedition Unkown'. 

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For those people who tried to resurrect dinosaurs and ice age creatures, what's the benefit in doing so?

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, woopypooky said:

For those people who tried to resurrect dinosaurs and ice age creatures, what's the benefit in doing so?

 

Jun 11, 1993Jurassic Park

$63,000,000 $50,159,460 $395,708,305 $1,038,812,584

May 22, 1997The Lost World: Jurassic Park

$75,000,000

$72,132,785 $229,086,679 $618,638,999 

Jul 18, 2001Jurassic Park III

$93,000,000

$50,771,645 $181,166,115 $365,900,000 

Jun 12, 2015Jurassic World

$215,000,000

$208,806,270 $652,198,010 $1,671,640,59

Jun 22, 2018Jurassic World Sequel  $0$0 

 

 Totals $446,000,000 $1,458,159,109 $3,694,992,176 

 Averages

$111,500,000 $95,467,540 $364,539,777 $923,748,044 

The Benefits of Cloning Dinosaurs

Edited by taniwha

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20 hours ago, woopypooky said:

For those people who tried to resurrect dinosaurs and ice age creatures, what's the benefit in doing so?

Well, first of all, you can never tell how such technology might be helpful in the future, say in medicine or gene therapy. Secondly, in the case of certain more modern creatures, like say Stellar's Sea Cow, Passenger Pigeon, Carolina Parakeet, Thylacine and many others, these were wiped out in fairly recent history by man's thoughtlessness. By removing them from their natural habitat, we changed the environment in which they lived. If we could bring them back, we might rectify the damage we have caused. 

As for dinosaurs, I'm fairly certain without good genetic material, that will not happen anytime soon. 

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Our ancestors hunted them and most other species of mega-fauna to extinction. If there's a chance we can undo mistakes of the past, I think we should bring them back! Bring a few back and set up a reserve for them.

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8 hours ago, Mattstar said:

Our ancestors hunted them and most other species of mega-fauna to extinction. If there's a chance we can undo mistakes of the past, I think we should bring them back! Bring a few back and set up a reserve for them.

From what I have read, humans played a part, but may not have been the biggest reason for their extinction.   Disease, lack of fresh water and climate change may have been bigger factors. 

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scientists are so preoccupied with whether or not they could that they didn't stop to think if they should.

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On 20/02/2017 at 2:07 AM, Sundew said:

Well, first of all, you can never tell how such technology might be helpful in the future, say in medicine or gene therapy. Secondly, in the case of certain more modern creatures, like say Stellar's Sea Cow, Passenger Pigeon, Carolina Parakeet, Thylacine and many others, these were wiped out in fairly recent history by man's thoughtlessness. By removing them from their natural habitat, we changed the environment in which they lived. If we could bring them back, we might rectify the damage we have caused. 

Better to spend the money saving species that are dying out now, before we have to rescue them form beyond extinction. As much as I love thylacines I'd rather see the money spent combating DFTD and saving the quoll. 

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9 hours ago, oldrover said:

Better to spend the money saving species that are dying out now, before we have to rescue them form beyond extinction. As much as I love thylacines I'd rather see the money spent combating DFTD and saving the quoll. 

I'm sure being two different disciplines, there's room for both ideals and funding for each likely comes from different sources, it's not like one group supports every cause.

The quoll is probably more endangered from introduced foxes and cats, whether they will ever be mostly controlled remains to be seen. 

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