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kmt_sesh

Let's talk history

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17 hours ago, Wickian said:

Just as long you aren't my middle school history teacher in disguise.  She tried to teach us that the people of ancient Egypt would go on picnics and climb the pyramids during a family outing to have some fun. 

So my question is:  How insane/uneducated was my teacher or was she somehow correct and I'm a heathen for doubting her?  Any Google searches don't bring up any answers to this question of mine.

Climbing the pyramids would have been physically rather difficult, considering that the outer casing was largely still preserved until the AD 1303 earthquake. Ancient Egyptians did celebrate certain festivals by going out for family picnics. The tradition still survives until now: "Sham al Nessim" (smelling the breeze) celebrates spring on Easter Monday. Families go on picnics preferably to gardens, traditionally eating colored eggs, spring onions and salted fish (feseekh, smells terrible but is delicious) 

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Is it true that the Anunnaki ate ORMUS?

Would that explain why they created us to mine gold?

Harte

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1 hour ago, meryt-tetisheri said:

Climbing the pyramids would have been physically rather difficult, considering that the outer casing was largely still preserved until the AD 1303 earthquake.

i'll bet there was a ladder builder from jerusalem that charged a shekel to go up and 2 shekels to come down

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19 hours ago, Tatetopa said:

Before the advent of metal, I believe flint and obsidian were traded in Europe and the Middle East.  Do we have any idea how far that network spread, and the timeline of those activities?

(The period 7000-4000 BC)

From the island of Melos (OIPE 1994, Whittle 137-8).  It found its way to sites in northern Greece (144).  

Tisza sites on the Hungarian plain acquired obsidian from up to 150 km away (146).  

Whittle mentions four further sources: Sardinia, Lipari, Pantelleria and Palmarola (Pontine Is.)

Sardinian obsidian found its way to Corsica, and N. Italy.

Lipari - to central and S. Italy.

Palmarola (Pontine Is.) - to central and S. Italy (153).

 

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9 hours ago, Jarocal said:

How did they pump water to the top of the hanging gardens in Babylon?

Guys with buckets and a holding pool every meter

or  the 'water screw' .

9 hours ago, Jarocal said:

What sort of laser device did the use in Pharoahs lighthouse to set enemy ships on fire?

Pharoahs had a light house ?   I never knew that !   I knew there was one at Pharos in Alexandria .

9 hours ago, Jarocal said:

Why does the Academic Cabal iqnore or bury Cladking's paradigm changing (and entertaining) assertions on a variety of things like Ancient Egyptian construction methods proper contextual understanding of Ancient Egyptian writings?

 

Because things that are dead and starting to smell should be buried . Its just a common decency to the rest of us .

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9 hours ago, internetperson said:

What is your take on the book of Revelations? It truly reads like a heavy acid trip.

Ergot fungus plus schizophrenia.

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Thanks for the replies.  I had been reading a bit about chert and obsidian trade in  North  America pre-Columbus.   it seems that there was a brisk trade up and down the Appalachian trail and also in the central plains around the Mississippi and Missouri rivers.    I think that might be in the current era, but may stretch back a lot longer.   Lots of Woodland sites seem to have artifacts from outside the local area.  I thought the same would be true around the Med.  Thanks for the Lapis Lazuli tip.   I guess the analogous stone in North America would be turquoise as far as trading.  

 

I did not know the Egyptians used lasers, I thought they were all about particle beam weapons.   I have heard they had a righteous hotel chain; Marriotts of the Gods. Thanks again.

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Marriotts of the Gods...damn, that's good.:lol:

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14 hours ago, internetperson said:

What is your take on the book of Revelations? It truly reads like a heavy acid trip.

Many modern Christians take Revelations as a prophecy about the End of Days. In my much younger days I would've agreed, but now I really favor the more academic assessment that this book is political propaganda wrapped up in religion. It certainly reads like a nightmarish vision, but that was probably deliberate on the part of the man who wrote it (the so-called John, although no relation to Jesus' disciple). Consider that this book was written not long after Rome had sacked Jerusalem in 70 CE and destroyed the Temple. This had to have been an incomprehensible disaster to Jews of that time, and many of these Jews in the first century were highly militant. They wanted nothing more than the utter destruction of Rome. One sees this pretty clearly even in the allegories of the Dead Sea Scrolls, many of which were written around the same time as Revelations.

So rather than a prophecy about the destruction of the world, it was a fervent hope for the righteous destruction of Rome at the hands of the second coming of Jesus. I've read it's unlikely the author, John, was even Christian, but many Jews of that period considered Jesus to be the messiah who would set things right—in this life or the next.

Or I could be way off and back to earth is right: a really wicked acid trip plus mental defect. But that's not as interesting.

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14 hours ago, Jarocal said:

...

Why does the Academic Cabal iqnore or bury Cladking's paradigm changing (and entertaining) assertions on a variety of things like Ancient Egyptian construction methods proper contextual understanding of Ancient Egyptian writings?

Now, if we admitted this and confessed, we wouldn't be much of a cabal, would we?

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7 hours ago, Harte said:

Is it true that the Anunnaki ate ORMUS?

Would that explain why they created us to mine gold?

Harte

That was only some of the Anunnaki. The rest preferred to eat colloidal silver, so that's why silver mining became so popular.

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8 hours ago, meryt-tetisheri said:

Climbing the pyramids would have been physically rather difficult, considering that the outer casing was largely still preserved until the AD 1303 earthquake. Ancient Egyptians did celebrate certain festivals by going out for family picnics. The tradition still survives until now: "Sham al Nessim" (smelling the breeze) celebrates spring on Easter Monday. Families go on picnics preferably to gardens, traditionally eating colored eggs, spring onions and salted fish (feseekh, smells terrible but is delicious) 

Eggs, onions, and fish? That's not a nassim I'd care to sham.

Sorry, couldn't resist. :innocent:

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Posted (edited)

On 3/13/2017 at 11:27 PM, Tatetopa said:

Before the advent of metal, I believe flint and obsidian were traded in Europe and the Middle East.  Do we have any idea how far that network spread, and the timeline of those activities?

carpathian 1 and carpathian 2 obsidian have been mined and traded continuously since the paleolithic. by the mesolithic it went north to central poland and by the neolithic to macedonia. melos obsidian has been found at frankhthi cave i think in 11kbc. it also went to egypt. 

oh.. there is a szeletian site i think at bukk that many feel is the first market stall with obsidian cores and blades all neatly lined up and arranged as if for sale.

this place in armenia is on the way from the lapis lazuli mines

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/04/150413-Paleolithic-obsidian-weapons-arteni-armenia-archaeology/

"Millions of weapons were made at Paleolithic “factory” in the Caucasus."

obsidian was traded in paleolithic japan even.

 

peace

Edited by cern
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3 minutes ago, cern said:

carpathian 1 and carpathian 2 obsidian have been mined and traded continuously since the paleolithic. by the mesolithic it went north to central poland and by the neolithic to macedonia. melos obsidian has been found at frankhthi cave i think in 11kbc. it also went to egypt. 

this place in armenia is on the way from the lapis lazuli mines

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/04/150413-Paleolithic-obsidian-weapons-arteni-armenia-archaeology/

"Millions of weapons were made at Paleolithic “factory” in the Caucasus."

obsidian was traded in paleolithic japan even.

 

peace

Correct me if necessary -- in earliest times there is an illusion of lots of trading activity over vast distances, but the reality was neighbor-to-neighbor exchanges that served over the generations to move stuff great distances.  I don't see long merchant caravans until later.

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36 minutes ago, kmt_sesh said:

Many modern Christians take Revelations as a prophecy about the End of Days. In my much younger days I would've agreed, but now I really favor the more academic assessment that this book is political propaganda wrapped up in religion. It certainly reads like a nightmarish vision, but that was probably deliberate on the part of the man who wrote it (the so-called John, although no relation to Jesus' disciple). Consider that this book was written not long after Rome had sacked Jerusalem in 70 CE and destroyed the Temple. This had to have been an incomprehensible disaster to Jews of that time, and many of these Jews in the first century were highly militant. They wanted nothing more than the utter destruction of Rome. One sees this pretty clearly even in the allegories of the Dead Sea Scrolls, many of which were written around the same time as Revelations.

So rather than a prophecy about the destruction of the world, it was a fervent hope for the righteous destruction of Rome at the hands of the second coming of Jesus. I've read it's unlikely the author, John, was even Christian, but many Jews of that period considered Jesus to be the messiah who would set things right—in this life or the next.

Or I could be way off and back to earth is right: a really wicked acid trip plus mental defect. But that's not as interesting.

Apocalyptic Christianity seems on the rise, at least for now, in political power, so it behooves us to have an accurate understanding of what these things are about.  You do a service.

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Posted (edited)

7 minutes ago, Frank Merton said:

Correct me if necessary -- in earliest times there is an illusion of lots of trading activity over vast distances, but the reality was neighbor-to-neighbor exchanges that served over the generations to move stuff great distances.  I don't see long merchant caravans until later.

i think the willendorf kostenki complex is considered a real thing isn't it? and if the melos obsidian is in the 11kbc layer on mainland greece then that sorta means the two neighbours were across a sea? we would call that trade today would we not?

Edited by cern
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1 hour ago, Frank Merton said:

Correct me if necessary -- in earliest times there is an illusion of lots of trading activity over vast distances, but the reality was neighbor-to-neighbor exchanges that served over the generations to move stuff great distances.  I don't see long merchant caravans until later.

Yes its the idea that A-B-C trade was rare A did not travel to C but traded it to B who traded it to C, as you noted above. A good example is Chinese to Rome trade in Silk. The two civilizations were only vaguely aware of one another, another example is the trade in pepper that went from India to Europe by A-B-C until the Portuguese and other Europeans cheated and started A to C by going around Africa cutting out the ME traders and the Venetians, Genoese and others.

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3 hours ago, Tatetopa said:

Thanks for the replies.  I had been reading a bit about chert and obsidian trade in  North  America pre-Columbus.   it seems that there was a brisk trade up and down the Appalachian trail and also in the central plains around the Mississippi and Missouri rivers.    I think that might be in the current era, but may stretch back a lot longer.   Lots of Woodland sites seem to have artifacts from outside the local area.  I thought the same would be true around the Med.  Thanks for the Lapis Lazuli tip.   I guess the analogous stone in North America would be turquoise as far as trading.  

 

I did not know the Egyptians used lasers, I thought they were all about particle beam weapons.   I have heard they had a righteous hotel chain; Marriotts of the Gods. Thanks again.

I put this up before ;  pearl shell trade routes  Indigenous Australia    

 

Image result for aboriginal trade routes in australia

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Posted (edited)

2 hours ago, kmt_sesh said:

Marriotts of the Gods...damn, that's good.:lol:

I prefer Meerkats of the Gods myself  

 

Meerkat-Astronaut-106065.jpg

.....  or was that ' Merkaba  of the Gods '  ? 

Edited by back to earth
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2 hours ago, kmt_sesh said:

Many modern Christians take Revelations as a prophecy about the End of Days. In my much younger days I would've agreed, but now I really favor the more academic assessment that this book is political propaganda wrapped up in religion. It certainly reads like a nightmarish vision, but that was probably deliberate on the part of the man who wrote it (the so-called John, although no relation to Jesus' disciple). Consider that this book was written not long after Rome had sacked Jerusalem in 70 CE and destroyed the Temple. This had to have been an incomprehensible disaster to Jews of that time, and many of these Jews in the first century were highly militant. They wanted nothing more than the utter destruction of Rome. One sees this pretty clearly even in the allegories of the Dead Sea Scrolls, many of which were written around the same time as Revelations.

So rather than a prophecy about the destruction of the world, it was a fervent hope for the righteous destruction of Rome at the hands of the second coming of Jesus. I've read it's unlikely the author, John, was even Christian, but many Jews of that period considered Jesus to be the messiah who would set things right—in this life or the next.

Or I could be way off and back to earth is right: a really wicked acid trip plus mental defect. But that's not as interesting.

Ohhh its ;interesting'  I think !   

Ch 4 ....   !   

( speaking of Merkabas   .....   I was writing about this in another form this morning in a post in religious section .... although, in a   sort of mathematical quantum way :)   ...   that could read a bit like Revelations itself ;  'ergot' and a dash of schiz     ;)   ) 

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2 hours ago, kmt_sesh said:

Now, if we admitted this and confessed, we wouldn't be much of a cabal, would we?

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Trade neighbor to neighbor, not over any distances?  Chinese I've talked to say you history incomplete,

Chinese Junks.

No shortage of sources and books out there::
  "
· Lake Tahoe. “Ta Ho” is Chinese for “Big Lake.” (Jeff Spira and KK Tan)
· Native American people of the Klamath River region can still identify Chinese words and intonations (Michael Pincus)
· Yosemite   – Yo Se Mi Te taken together in Chinese means magnificent mountain, beautiful place. It’s now a national park in Northern California;
Suisan Bay – Sui is water & San is hill; taken together Suisan is ‘Water & Hill Bay’. Located in Northern California near Sacramento – Ben Young
· On the arrival of the Europeans to the east coast of American they heard the local Indians speak of ‘moccocine’ being the skin stiched foot wear.  The Mongolian word for their foot wear is ‘managocine’ which translated into English means “ Our foot wear” (Dorsha Unkow)
· Our attention was drawn by one reader to the following extract:
“… The Tartar Chinese speak the dialect of the Apaches. The Apaches bear a striking resemblance to the Tartar. In about the year 1885, W. B. Horton, who had served as County Superintendent of Schools, at Tucson, was appointed Post Trader at Camp Apache, and went to San Francisco to purchase his stock, where he hired a Chinese cook. His kitchen adjoined his sleeping apartment, and one evening while in his room he heard in the kitchen some Indians talking. Wondering what they were doing there at that hour of the night, he opened the door and found his cook conversing with an Apache. He asked his cook where he had acquired the Indian language. The cook said: “He speak all same me. I Tartar Chinese; he speak same me, little different, not much.”

"

Edited by MWoo7

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36 minutes ago, Hanslune said:

Yes its the idea that A-B-C trade was rare A did not travel to C but traded it to B who traded it to C, as you noted above. A good example is Chinese to Rome trade in Silk. The two civilizations were only vaguely aware of one another, another example is the trade in pepper that went from India to Europe by A-B-C until the Portuguese and other Europeans cheated and started A to C by going around Africa cutting out the ME traders and the Venetians, Genoese and others.

Thought I would mention that not only the goods ( but not necessarily the people )  moved the distance but, ideas, knowledge, stories, etc ;   ie.  'contact'  of various types .   

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12 minutes ago, MWoo7 said:

Trade neighbor to neighbor, not over any distances?

Chinese Junks

No shortage of sources and books out there::
  "
· Lake Tahoe. “Ta Ho” is Chinese for “Big Lake.” (Jeff Spira and KK Tan)
· Native American people of the Klamath River region can still identify Chinese words and intonations (Michael Pincus)
· Yosemite   – Yo Se Mi Te taken together in Chinese means magnificent mountain, beautiful place. It’s now a national park in Northern California;
Suisan Bay – Sui is water & San is hill; taken together Suisan is ‘Water & Hill Bay’. Located in Northern California near Sacramento – Ben Young
· On the arrival of the Europeans to the east coast of American they heard the local Indians speak of ‘moccocine’ being the skin stiched foot wear.  The Mongolian word for their foot wear is ‘managocine’ which translated into English means “ Our foot wear” (Dorsha Unkow)
· Our attention was drawn by one reader to the following extract:
“… The Tartar Chinese speak the dialect of the Apaches. The Apaches bear a striking resemblance to the Tartar. In about the year 1885, W. B. Horton, who had served as County Superintendent of Schools, at Tucson, was appointed Post Trader at Camp Apache, and went to San Francisco to purchase his stock, where he hired a Chinese cook. His kitchen adjoined his sleeping apartment, and one evening while in his room he heard in the kitchen some Indians talking. Wondering what they were doing there at that hour of the night, he opened the door and found his cook conversing with an Apache. He asked his cook where he had acquired the Indian language. The cook said: “He speak all same me. I Tartar Chinese; he speak same me, little different, not much.”

"

 

Wow   Woo   !  

I have a similar paper comparing  a lot of Indonesian language and myth to local Indigenous Bundjalung .  

But ....    well   ...   I'm no linguist . 

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