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Graphene sieve makes seawater drinkable

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This will be a great, now you can filter salt water/dirty water ... and drink it
 

Quote

 

Graphene sieve turns seawater into drinking water

Graphene-oxide membranes have attracted considerable attention as promising candidates for new filtration technologies. Now the much sought-after development of making membranes capable of sieving common salts has been achieved.

New research demonstrates the real-world potential of providing clean drinking water for millions of people who struggle to access adequate clean water sources.

The new findings from a group of scientists at The University of Manchester were published today in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. Previously graphene-oxide membranes have shown exciting potential for gas separation and water filtration.

Graphene-oxide membranes developed at the National Graphene Institute have already demonstrated the potential of filtering out small nanoparticles, organic molecules, and even large salts. Until now, however, they couldn't be used for sieving common salts used in desalination technologies, which require even smaller sieves.


Read more at: https://phys.org/news/2017-04-graphene-sieve-seawater.html#jCp


 

 

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Thinking this report promising, I searched "Projected cost efficiency of desalinating water with graphene membranes?"

I found:

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Low Cost Nanomaterials for Water Desalination and ... - Unesco

www.unesco.org/fileadmin/MULTIMEDIA/FIELD/Cairo/Desal...Proxy  Highlight

enhancement of the rate of water desalination due to presence of efficient photothermal ...

of silver nanomaterials and Graphene to enhance the photothermal ... nanoparticles,

nanostructured catalytic membranes and nanoparticle ..... Figure (7): Low energy

DFT 3D band structure and its projection on kx close to k point K

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Nonetheless, I await additional news from a worthier source.

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heres is an invention called the Lifestraw....

http://lifestraw.com/

 

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The smell would gag me.

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About time! 

It's years that we are talking about it, maybe finally we'll see some concrete development. 

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Way too many "could" and "may" like statements in there... I "may" get excited about this in the future if they "could" offer something more concrete

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On 4/3/2017 at 4:04 PM, seeder said:

heres is an invention called the Lifestraw....

http://lifestraw.com/

 

I know many who have used the lifestraw in all kinds of back country situations and never once has anyone had any problems with it not working. 

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Posted (edited)

7 hours ago, Chortle said:

Way too many "could" and "may" like statements in there... I "may" get excited about this in the future if they "could" offer something more concrete

Much is possible with nanotechnology today.  Thus, key to the main article, the development of graphene-oxide membranes and the feasibility of using them to purify water was the statement following:

"Professor Rahul Nair, at The University of Manchester said: "Realisation of scalable membranes with uniform pore size down to atomic scale is a significant step forward and will open new possibilities for improving the efficiency of desalination technology."

Edited by aka CAT
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On 4/3/2017 at 4:04 PM, seeder said:

heres is an invention called the Lifestraw....

http://lifestraw.com/

 

She may have issues.    She keeps drinking it.

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How will it be cleaned? the pores will get blocked up...maybe turn it upside down and tap it?

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1 hour ago, seanjo said:

How will it be cleaned? the pores will get blocked up...maybe turn it upside down and tap it?

maybe they will just add new filters and discard the old?

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Posted (edited)

2 hours ago, seeder said:

maybe they will just add new filters and discard the old?

Pretty sure they can do that anyway with present materials tech....is graphene cheaper maybe?

 

Edited by seanjo

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On 4/3/2017 at 11:08 PM, aka CAT said:

The smell would gag me.

we taste with our nose as much as with our  mouth.  so only if absolutely needed.

 

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7 hours ago, seanjo said:

Pretty sure they can do that anyway with present materials tech....is graphene cheaper maybe?

 

i don't think you can filter sea water until now.

 

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10 hours ago, seeder said:

maybe they will just add new filters and discard the old?

what do you do with the used filters and how often do you need to change them.  we need cleanable filters that don't get thrown away every time they get dirty.

 

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5 minutes ago, danielost said:

what do you do with the used filters and how often do you need to change them.  we need cleanable filters that don't get thrown away every time they get dirty.

 

 they are re-useable

do read

https://phys.org/news/2017-03-reusable-carbon-nanotubes-filter-future.html

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2 minutes ago, danielost said:

good,  but what do you do with the waste product.  the salt could be used on icy sidewalks.  but what about the rest.

 

 

sell it, as sea salt,,, like we do already

 

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6 minutes ago, seeder said:

 

sell it, as sea salt,,, like we do already

 

i was thinking of the bacteria that might be in it.

 

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11 minutes ago, danielost said:

i was thinking of the bacteria that might be in it.

 

 

who gives a crap...people need water....and you just focus on salt!!

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Posted (edited)

yes people need more water than food but not by much.  of course the salt could destroy the bacteria and you could use it for table salt.  i am also thinking of a project in which i could use as much fresh water from sea water as i can get  and this looks cheaper and faster than other ways of doing it.

Edited by danielost

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4 minutes ago, danielost said:

 project in which i could use as much fresh water from sea water as i can get  and this looks cheaper and faster than other ways of doing it.

 

OK. Look up how much salt is in a ton of seawater...and come back with some info. It may be less that you think

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1 minute ago, seeder said:

 

OK. Look up how much salt is in a ton of seawater...and come back with some info. It may be less that you think

not enough to sell but more than you need to cook with.

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3 minutes ago, danielost said:

not enough to sell but more than you need to cook with.

 

 

Quote

The concentration of salt in seawater (salinity) is about 35 parts per thousand. Stated in another way, about 3.5 percent of the weight of seawater comes from the dissolved salts; in a cubic mile of seawater, the weight of the salt (in the form of sodium chloride) would be about 120 million tons.

 

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