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rashore

Walton Abduction Soil Analysis

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A study of soil samples completed by Frontier Analysis Limited last week of the site where the alleged abduction took place has provided some interesting insight into the story, and perhaps has begun to shed some light onto that mysterious event in 1975. Led by Phyllis A. Budinger, an accomplished   chemist and scientist, the report details the soil composition of the location directly beneath the strange object Walton saw that night.

According to the report....

http://mysteriousuniverse.org/2017/04/walton-abduction-soil-analysis-suggests-anomalous-event/

 

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29 minutes ago, rashore said:

How does Frontier Analysis Limited know:

"the hovering craft propulsion system has a powerful electromagnetic effect thereby drawing (and concentrating) these iron particulates toward the surface…And, there is indication that while hovering an electronic force field surrounds the craft, causing an ionizing effect to materials in close proximity" 

They'd have to how the propulsion system works in order to know what kind of EM it emits and how that EM would affect the soil.  Also, I can find no info about Frontier Analysis Limited other than they were incorporated in Ohio as a LLC in 2000.   That in and of itself means nothing but you'd think they'd have a website if they were legit. 

 

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Posted (edited)

The verbiage about the effects of the propulsion system system of the supposed UFO is labeled as speculation in the article, as it apparently was, in the original report.  Below, find a link to a MUFON page on Frontier Analysis Ltd., and its head, Phyllis Budinger.  

Frontier Analysis is described as a small laboratory, created specifically to analyze physical traces of UFO events. Not being ordinary commercial laboratory, perhaps a website was considered unnecessary.

http://www.mufonohio.com/mufono/FRtour.html 

Edited by bison
improved paragraph structure
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I was curious to see if the person named as the one doing the analysis was real and she is. The lab just does studies of things believed to be UFO related.

http://www.mufonohio.com/mufono/FRtour.html

Quote

About Frontier Analysis Ltd.:

A life long interest in the mystery of the UFO phenomenon was the impetus for
Phyllis Budinger to establish a small laboratory dedicated to the study of physical traces
related to UFO events. Frontier Analysis, Ltd. was launched in March 2000.

Since then, the laboratory has examined numerous UFO trace samples from all over the world.
These include samples from abductions, cattle mutilations, crop circles, UFO deposits, and angel hair.

Some highly visible cases for which analyses have been provided include:

Soil traces from the Delphos Kansas landing event

Bedding material from a 2002 alleged abduction case in Brazil

The Betty Hill abduction dress

Assorted samples from Stan Romanek's experience.

The original report can be found here

http://www.ancient-code.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/waltonsoilsamplereport.pdf

 

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I wonder why the samples were taken as shown on the map. The samples do not seem to be taken in a method that is systematic.

I noticed too that site 7, a control site, is a high carbon site just like site 3. Notice that in both the silicon is low. This suggests these are soil samples with less silicates, the bulk of the surface minerals, and more hummus.

Without being able to learn more than relative position I wonder if the sample sites are enriched by iron by simple aqueous transport. Iron is a common element. It is easily transported by water. It tends to collect in low spots. Iron containing minerals are dense. They are the black sands seen at beaches. They form reddish stains in places.

Does this study simply show that iron ends up in low spots?

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Posted (edited)

56 minutes ago, bison said:

The verbiage about the effects of the propulsion system system of the supposed UFO is labeled as speculation in the article, as it apparently was, in the original report.  Below, find a link to a MUFON page on Frontier Analysis Ltd., and its head, Phyllis Budinger.  

Frontier Analysis is described as a small laboratory, created specifically to analyze physical traces of UFO events. Not being ordinary commercial laboratory, perhaps a website was considered unnecessary.

http://www.mufonohio.com/mufono/FRtour.html 

Ok, I reread and they were speculating about how the propulsion system could've cause this slightly higher iron concentration but still, wouldn't that just attract the particles to the craft itself?   I can't comment on how this mechanism could work, maybe it does so I'll leave it at that but thanks for straightening me out Bison.

48 minutes ago, stereologist said:

I was curious to see if the person named as the one doing the analysis was real and she is. The lab just does studies of things believed to be UFO related.

http://www.mufonohio.com/mufono/FRtour.html

The original report can be found here

http://www.ancient-code.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/waltonsoilsamplereport.pdf

 

I kind of figured it was that kind of lab but couldn't find anything else so well done Stereologist.   Do you know if the above effect is a realistic result from the application of a strong electromagnetic field?

Edited by Merc14
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It's been over 40 years since this event took place...could there really still be evidence after all that time?

BTW, I recall many years ago people saying that Mr Walton and the other witnesses all passed lie detector tests. Does anyone happen to know if this is true?

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Posted (edited)

2 hours ago, Lilly said:

It's been over 40 years since this event took place...could there really still be evidence after all that time?

That was my first question but the answer I cam eup with was a definite "Maybe yes, maybe no."  Stereologist would be a better guy to answer that question.  

Quote

BTW, I recall many years ago people saying that Mr Walton and the other witnesses all passed lie detector tests. Does anyone happen to know if this is true?

Travis Walton passed a polygraph sponsored by a UFO organization a polygraph for which he dictated the questions that would be asked.  He failed, miserably, an impartial polygraph given by one of the best examiners in the state, a Jack McCarthy. McCarthy's assessment of the exam was "A gross deception."  McCarthy also said that Travis tried using methods to fool the polygraph like holding your breath and such things.   The original polygraph, by McCarthy,was paid for by the National Enquirer which subsequently dropped the Walton case as a hoax, the test you are referring to was a few months later and very suspect in all respects (who paid for it, who administered it, the questions etc.)  Google Travis Walton and Philip J. Klass if you are interested or I could dig up the stuff I read if you want.

Here is a NICAP report that I would consider legit http://www.cufos.org/UFOI_and_Selected_Documents/UFOI/123 JUNE 1976.pdf

Edited by Merc14
add info.
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I'm not surprised as I thought this one had been proven to be a hoax awhile back.

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On the note of lie detector testing, I did find that the Pascagoula abduction case did involve lie detector testing.   http://blog.gulflive.com/mississippi-press-news/2013/10/calvin_bryant_tells_his_story.html    

However, more skeptical investigators dismissed the results.

 

UFO skeptic Philip Klass believed Hickson and Parker's report was a hoax. In his book "UFOs Explained," he noted Hickson changed some details of his story and claimed a polygraph operator whose test Hickson passed wasn't up to the task. Parker later passed a lie detector test himself....

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The abridged title...LOL

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So, the 'lab' was an offshoot of MUFON.  Yep, that's the way to get unbiased, real scientific data.  :td:

As stereo points out, the methodology is amateurish (I'm being kind) and shows little sign of proper controls, by a person with only chemistry training - this sort of thing involves a LOT more than chemistry.  That's why, folks, it appears on a website called ancient-codedotwhatever, rather than a respected scientific organisation.

 

BTW, lie detectors are not only beatable but even more importantly- assuming they can be relied upon (they cannot) - they would only tell you that the person believes what they are saying.  That has little or nothing to do with proving the reality of what actually happened (or didn't...).

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Such a fascinating and brilliant case.  Interesting reading but I have to say adds little to the case overall.

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I would  be surprised that a short term magnetic field could transport the ions as suggested. This would be transport in soil which may have been dry at the time. Electric fields do transport ions. We know that. That is how electroplating works. We also know that magnetic fields can rotate particles in lava and soils. That is how paleomagnetic studies are done.

But here we have a suggestion that particles were moved in soil by a powerful field. That seems a bit outrageous to me. I've read a few reports by soil scientists doing studies of agricultural fields and they report differences across farm fields. A check of soil science articles should be informative.

http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.4141/cjss76-027

Quote

Most metals increased with increasing clay or organic matter content of the soil.

http://corn.agronomy.wisc.edu/Management/pdfs/a3554.pdf

Quote
The concentration of iron in the soil
solution decreases sharply as the soil pH
increases, with a minimum around pH
7.4–8.5.

There is more to learn in the second article as well.

Overall, the issue is more likely to be about soil types and conditions than a speculative UFO system suggested from someone that appears to e a hoaxer.

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54 minutes ago, stereologist said:

I would  be surprised that a short term magnetic field could transport the ions as suggested. This would be transport in soil which may have been dry at the time. Electric fields do transport ions. We know that. That is how electroplating works. We also know that magnetic fields can rotate particles in lava and soils. That is how paleomagnetic studies are done.

But here we have a suggestion that particles were moved in soil by a powerful field. That seems a bit outrageous to me. I've read a few reports by soil scientists doing studies of agricultural fields and they report differences across farm fields. A check of soil science articles should be informative.

http://www.nrcresearchpress.com/doi/abs/10.4141/cjss76-027

http://corn.agronomy.wisc.edu/Management/pdfs/a3554.pdf

There is more to learn in the second article as well.

Overall, the issue is more likely to be about soil types and conditions than a speculative UFO system suggested from someone that appears to e a hoaxer.

What makes you suggest he was a hoaxer?  Don't forget the whole part never wavered from their original account. 

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1 hour ago, Bixxy said:

What makes you suggest he was a hoaxer?  Don't forget the whole part never wavered from their original account. 

He seemed to be in it for the money.

According to Klass, no one in Walton's family seemed upset about his missing time.

It is a bunch of guys who told a story and stuck to it. The story seems to have been a means of keeping money in the pocket.

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Posted (edited)

Back to the soil analysis, I wonder how a chemist is going to provide a demo that iron transport can happen without resorting to some fictional physics.

Edited by stereologist
can't type worth beans
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My mate is a soil scientist, no one ever listens to him. Sad I suppose. 

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It seemed the article talked about soil ionization (I could be wrong)  If I am not wrong could that happen because of a lightning strike?

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