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Mr. Box

Freemasonry and its shadow

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Too bad I'm a girl and I can't have any meaningful connection. 

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Here we go folks ! :)   

A bit of masonic history which does not indicate an ongoing Masonic oral tradition - from a masonic historian    ;

First, one notices Masonry seems a gradual development and accretion , so it was constantly changing - if it was purely  an oral  tradition   then  ( and there is a good reason for that see golded below )  then it wasn't ever the same ritual but changed over time ( and this relates to my comments above about 'regulation' . 

 

The exact details of the quarrel are not known, but, as a result of this row, 12 skilled master masons, with some famous men among them, came before the mayor and aldermen at Guildhall in London, and, with official permission, drew up a simple code of trade regulations.

The opening words of that document, which still survives ... "      Its written tradition seems to start here  and it speaks of a document , which is not 'oral' 

The first actual information about lodges comes to us from a collection of documents which we know as the ‘Old Charges’ or the Manuscript Constitutions’ of masonry ...They begin with the Regius Manuscript c1390; the next, the Cooke Manuscript is dated c1410 and we have 130 versions of these documents running right through to the eighteenth century. ......."   More documents .

Now some ritual element of ceremony and what they did back then enters into it ;   " The oldest version, the Regius Manuscript, is in rhyming verse and differs, in several respects, from the other texts, but, in their general shape and contents they are all very much alike. They begin with an Opening Prayer, Christian and Trinitarian, and then they go on with a history of the craft, starting in Bible times ....  "    - The first formations of ritual and ceremony ... from a manuscript , not oral. 

" Then, after the history we find the regulations, the actual Charges, for masters, fellows and apprentices, including several rules of a purely moral character, and that is all. Occasionally, the name of one of the characters changes, or the wording of a regulation will be altered slightly, but all follow the same general pattern. ... "  - this is still from that document .

Apart from these three main sections, prayer, history and Charges, in most of them we find a few words which indicate the beginnings of masonic ceremony. I must add that we cannot find all the information in one single document; but when we study them as a collection, it is possible to reconstruct the outline of the admission ceremony of those days, the earliest ceremony of admission into the craft. "  -   from a collection of documents  . 

" We know that the ceremony, such as it was, began with an opening prayer and then there was a ‘reading of the history "

NOTE :  "  In those days, 99 masons in 100 could not read, and we believe, therefore, that they selected particular sections of the history which they memorized and recited from memory. To read the whole text, even if they could read, would have taken much too long. So the second part of the ceremony was the ‘reading’.   -  this makes sense and explains why some of the ritual and sometimes it was oral .

Then, we find an instruction, which appears regularly in practically every document, usually in Latin, and it says: ‘Then one of the elders holds out a book (sometimes “the book”, sometimes the “Bible”, and sometimes the ” Holy Bible”) and he or they that are to be admitted shall place their hand .... "     -     Instructions as to actions were also written down .

the following Charges shall be read.’ In that position the regulations were read out to the candidate and he took the oath, 

From this point onwards, the oath becomes the heart and marrow, the crucial center of every masonic ceremony. The Regius, which is the first of the versions to survive, emphasizes this and it is worth quoting here.... "    ( The Regulus is a document ) .

And now there is one other point that must be mentioned before I go any further. I have been speaking of a time when there was only one degree. "    -   this is evidence of   NO standardised ritual passing on , orally or in print , again constantly changing.

The Harleian MS is a perfectly normal version of the Old Charges, but bound up with it is a note in the same handwriting containing a new version of the mason’s oath, of particular importance because it shows a major change from all earlier forms of the oath " -  Another manuscript with a new written down form . 

It even quotes this !  ;   "Brethren, I know that I recited it too fast, but now I am going to read the first line again: "  -  evidence of reading out in a ritual . 

Now we have an early form of the direction  to the candidate NOT TO WRITE IT DOWN     ..... get it ?  The candidate is not to write it down ,  to preserve its secrecy .....  otherwise he might  give it to someone or loose it or someone might see it ... they went further and you were not allowed to write it down any way  ;   Brethren, if you were listening very carefully, you have just heard the earliest version of the words ‘Indite, carve, mark, engrave or otherwise them delineate’. The very first version is the one I have just read, ‘not write nor put it in wryte, nor draw it with a point of a sword or any other instrument upon the snow or sand. 

But as I said , someone originally writes out the ritual ;   especially when a new type of masonry appears ;   " Then, in readiness for the first meeting of the lodge, he started off at what would have been page one with some notes, we do not know the details. But he went on and copied out the whole of one of these Scottish rituals, complete from beginning to end. "

More written additions and changes ;    " the Sloane MS, dated c1700, an English text, in the British Library today. It gives various ‘gripes’ which had not appeared in any document before. It gives a new form of the Mason’s oath which contains the words ‘without Equivocation or mental reservation’. That appears for the very first time in the Sloane MS, "

the Sloane MS which does not attempt to describe a whole ceremony. It has a fantastic collection of ‘gripes’ and other strange modes of recognition. It has a catechism of some twenty-two Questions and Answers "

" Now we have another Scottish document, the Dumfries No 4 MS, dated c1710. It contains a mass of new material, "

- a steady build up of texts which show an accretion of material to form a written down ritual  - exactly what I claimed. 

" The earliest hints of the third degree appear in documents like those that I have been talking about – mainly documents that have been written out as aide-memoires for the men who owned them ".

" we get some useful hints of the third degree long before it actually appears in practice. And so, we start with one of the best, a lovely little text, a single sheet of paper known as the Trinity College, Dublin, Manuscript,"

 

 

"  I  must add a note here for Brethren in the USA. You will realise that until the changes which I have just described, I have been talking about your ritual as well as ours in England. After the War of Independence the States rapidly began to set up their own Grand Lodges, but your ritual, mainly of English origin – whether Antients or Moderns – was still basically. English. Your big changes began in and around 1796, when Thomas Smith Webb, of Albany, NY, teamed up with an English Mason, John Hanmer, who was well versed in Preston’s Lecture system.

In 1797 Webb published his Freemason’s Monitor or Illustrations of Masonry, largely based on Preston’s Illustrations. Webb’s Monitor, adapted from our ritual when, as I said, it was at its shining best, became so popular, that the American Grand Lodges, mainly in the Eastern states at that time, did everything they could to preserve it in its original form; eventually by the appointment of Grand Lecturers, whose duty it was (and is) to ensure that the officially adopted forms remain unchanged. "

So , there is the written source  of Nth American Masonry  ... from a Monitor  ... as I also  claimed . 

 

http://freemasoninformation.com/masonic-education/history/600-years-of-craft-ritual/

 

 

 

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PS;    ......   This is not paper   .... so it cant be burned   ;)  

 

( Book burning !    Goodness me    !    :o   ) 

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12 minutes ago, ChaosRose said:

Too bad I'm a girl and I can't have any meaningful connection. 

 

I dont see why not .... if you want to .   ordinary masonry has women's parts    Co-masonry has women initiates . And my ( terrible spurious version ... that does not burn its own books )   has men and women ...... I am going to drop a bomb here .... see the temple tumble over !  

My first  initiation was done by a woman Lodge Master !

 

Image result for group shock horror gif

 

 

 

 

  ( but we were a modern progressive group ;) )

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Posted (edited)

22 hours ago, MstrMsn said:

I'm an officer in my Lodge, and have been involved in the initiation of candidates for the last several years. We don't learn from a book, we learn our ritual orally. I have no idea where you are getting this "learn from books".

Yes, books about ritual have been written (like Duncan's Masonic Ritual, that BTE linked to), we don't use them. Some might. 

I think that THAT might have been the book that was given to me that I burned. I know that it was probably silly but it just made me feel dirty to have it in my possession. I thank you for your assistance in this. I just couldn't seem to find a way to express that I/we learned our work entirely orally any clearer. Personally if that is the most interesting thing that was left for people to wonder about I think that I covered the "secrets" of freemasonry pretty thoroughly and turn it over to anyone else that has anything to offer. I hope that it was of some help to those of you that had an open mind and genuine curiosity. 

My personal experience with Freemasonry was and has been one of great experiences of my life. My degrees were done by the very people that I most admired in the world. My Dad was my Senior Deacon My best man worked in the degree as did my Minister and my Fathers best friend and the man that I went to when I needed a sponsor for my application. He actually was the worshipful master by the time I was raised to master mason. They were the men that had helped make me the man that I was and it was my greatest honor to be accepted into their midst in this way. 

I never have understood the angst about women not being in the lodge. There are other groups that offer women equal membership rights. I am also Eastern Star as is my wife. The thing is that as times change I believe that will change too. The thing is as good as most masons are we are Human. That means that it only takes one person to block any persons membership. This is required if you are going to have absolute faith and trust. Besides men need some just male bonding opportunities that don't include women just as women need the same thing. When men and women are together it changes the chemistry of the relationships developed. This is just how people are and has always been true. 

Actually most masons through out history have been rather enlightened people with very few illiterates. In the early days the Brotherhood tended to be more common among the more affluent and educated. George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Paul Revere and such were not illiterates. NOW all that said there were no restrictions and even many native Americans became Freemasons. I will say this though. I have never known or heard of a mason that was of low intelligence. I think to some extent that was part of the use of learning the work. It will test your intelligence and dedication. I have known several men that received their Apprentice degree and never learned their work and never returned. On the other side I have seen several that worked incredibly hard and were passed with "slightly" less than perfect learning of their work. We are looking for GOOD men not rocket scientists.  

Edited by DanL
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3 hours ago, DanL said:

 

I never have understood the angst about women not being in the lodge. There are other groups that offer women equal membership rights. I am also Eastern Star as is my wife. The thing is that as times change I believe that will change too.

But the problem for masonry is ... it hasnt !   Thats one reason why modern people dont join and the numbers are rapidly dropping. Things have moved on and people inclined in such a way will join more progressive groups which are a reflection of modern society, which ... now ... is working more towards sexual equality . 

Should not such wonderful and beneficial principles , as claimed ,   be available to women nowadays ... what is in these valuable teachings of masonry that Can not apply to women ?    Especially in today's world where ( theoretically ), they can take on the roles and jobs that require such education and good principles ?    Its a big topic, but I won't open it further here .

3 hours ago, DanL said:

. This is required if you are going to have absolute faith and trust. Besides men need some just male bonding opportunities that don't include women just as women need the same thing. When men and women are together it changes the chemistry of the relationships developed. This is just how people are and has always been true. 

On some levels I agree with this .   In other areas ( eg my Shamanic studies with the indigenous )    men's and women's 'business' is certainly divided !  But this is a system from  over 20,000 years ago !  

Modern society  IS  about men and women being together .....    the ;chemistry'  is SUPPOSED to be changing  ... thats why we want women to take their equal place in society ... to change the chemistry .   Isnt it ????? 

3 hours ago, DanL said:

 NOW all that said there were no restrictions and even many native Americans became Freemasons.

:wacko:  ... what do you mean by     'even '   many native Americans became Freemasons      ?  

3 hours ago, DanL said:

I will say this though. I have never known or heard of a mason that was of low intelligence.

Its relative,  I suppose .

 

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On 5/19/2017 at 5:35 PM, MstrMsn said:

I'm an officer in my Lodge, and have been involved in the initiation of candidates for the last several years. We don't learn from a book, we learn our ritual orally. I have no idea where you are getting this "learn from books".

Yes, books about ritual have been written (like Duncan's Masonic Ritual, that BTE linked to), we don't use them. Some might. 

You have someone teach it to you and recite it?  I know we had books and practiced from those.  We did have to get it letter perfect, which was scary the first several times you did it.  

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I don't know what all the silly bickering is about (the guilty know who they are). I am not a Mason nor am I well associated with Masons (of which I'm aware), but having read all of this back-and-forth arguing it seems pretty obvious to me that different lodges carry out different traditions (e.g., oral, written). And that doesn't strike me as surprising.

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It goes back to an original claim about masonry  , which I was disputing, but the actuality of the original point seems to have been lost amongst a few things .  

It wasnt at all about if lodges operate differently or the same , it was what it was about .... what it was about in the posts when first mentioned. Then this silly insert that there never was a written version .  I have shown that , although lodges are indeed different and evolved and change over time , we DO have records of that in a written tradition, so it is not some secret unchanged oral only tradition INSIDE of the rest of known Freemasonry and its written history  ... as originally claimed and to which I was responding to .   But peeps kept challenging that with side issues .....    and it is tedious to constantly have to explain when things are a side issue or irrelevant  ... especially when they wrong and  the subject  slips out of focus  due to misreading or reacting . 

 

 

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Posted (edited)

15 hours ago, back to earth said:

It goes back to an original claim about masonry  , which I was disputing, but the actuality of the original point seems to have been lost amongst a few things .  

It wasnt at all about if lodges operate differently or the same , it was what it was about .... what it was about in the posts when first mentioned. Then this silly insert that there never was a written version .  I have shown that , although lodges are indeed different and evolved and change over time , we DO have records of that in a written tradition, so it is not some secret unchanged oral only tradition INSIDE of the rest of known Freemasonry and its written history  ... as originally claimed and to which I was responding to .   But peeps kept challenging that with side issues .....    and it is tedious to constantly have to explain when things are a side issue or irrelevant  ... especially when they wrong and  the subject  slips out of focus  due to misreading or reacting . 

 

Agreed.  There are written records and no secret insider oral only traditions.  Wanted to add that the "oral traditions" of reciting the whole Koran go back to someone reading it and listening to others recite it until they got it perfect.  The original person couldn't change or accept changes since there was a written version that stood as the immutable source.

An "oral tradition" has to be widely known.  Think about it in terms of music (which is really easy to use, since it's recited words but set to a tune.)

 

How many of you can sing "house of the rising sun"?  Even some verses?  Or "America the Beautiful" or "My country tis of thee" (substitute appropriate national songs for wherever you live.)  Most folks can get it perfectly; some still get words or verses wrong.

 

It lives because it's widely known.  "The Great Silkie" (of about the same age) is almost unknown and likewise "Drank Lonesome Water."  Both of these survive today and are occasionally sung; "Lonesome Water" is somewhat better known thanks to Manly Wade Wellman.  But with an oral tradition, when numbers become small, the piece dies or becomes corrupted because there's no one there to correct faults.

Edited by Kenemet
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On 5/20/2017 at 7:34 PM, Kenemet said:

You have someone teach it to you and recite it?  I know we had books and practiced from those.  We did have to get it letter perfect, which was scary the first several times you did it.  

In "regular" Freemasonry (not sure about BTE's type) part of our obligation (oath) is that we basically don't write down any of the secrets or mysteries of the fraternity, or we'll be kicked out. I have seen several members of my and other Lodges kicked out for violating various parts of the obligations. 

That said, Rainbow, DeMolay and other groups don't have the same "restrictions" (for a lack of a better word). 

 

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Posted (edited)

I've only just happend upon this thread, very interesting

Edited by EBE Hybrid

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1 hour ago, MstrMsn said:

In "regular" Freemasonry (not sure about BTE's type) part of our obligation (oath) is that we basically don't write down any of the secrets or mysteries of the fraternity, or we'll be kicked out. I have seen several members of my and other Lodges kicked out for violating various parts of the obligations. 

That said, Rainbow, DeMolay and other groups don't have the same "restrictions" (for a lack of a better word). 

 

No,  we too are not allowed to write out or copy the scripts .   Initiation ritual scripts are distributed by Grand Lodge to approved initiators only and they retain ownership of them. This is to ensure regularisation of ritual in all bodies.  It is also forbidden to deviate, add or subtract from the script.  On a body closing, the material has to be returned. 

When officers are learning their parts, they learn off that script, when practicing they are  tested to see if they are following the script. To rely on a single person's memory of getting the whole of 8  ( the usual number of rites done in such a Lodge ) lengthy  ritual scripts  (including regalia, and the temple layout and furniture and objects (including regulation sizes )  is not something I would personally ( and International Lodge )  would not be happy with or confident about . 

Even with these conditions, as assistant to SGIG I have seen some wild interpretations and mistakes that lead to rather strange interpretations of what I considered was clearly written instruction.   But this group are a highly 'regularised' body   (in themselves, not generally ....  as  'Regular Masons ' . ) 

I think, some masonic groups are free to change the ritual (regionally under GL jurisdiction )  as the will .    

"  Each Grand Lodge sets its own definition of what these landmarks are, and thus what is Regular and what is Irregular (and the definitions do not necessarily agree between Grand Lodges). "     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freemasonry#Regularity

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Posted (edited)

Basically I mean  ... there are things that Grand Lodges, high level bodies  ... and members   are allowed to do ( like write down and publish rituals and directives )  that individual 'ordinary members '  are not allowed to do . 

Just because the  general members are not allowed to something, does not mean that it is  not done at all   ;) 

Edited by back to earth
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16 hours ago, back to earth said:

No,  we too are not allowed to write out or copy the scripts .   Initiation ritual scripts are distributed by Grand Lodge to approved initiators only and they retain ownership of them. This is to ensure regularisation of ritual in all bodies.  It is also forbidden to deviate, add or subtract from the script.  On a body closing, the material has to be returned. 

When officers are learning their parts, they learn off that script, when practicing they are  tested to see if they are following the script. To rely on a single person's memory of getting the whole of 8  ( the usual number of rites done in such a Lodge ) lengthy  ritual scripts  (including regalia, and the temple layout and furniture and objects (including regulation sizes )  is not something I would personally ( and International Lodge )  would not be happy with or confident about . 

Even with these conditions, as assistant to SGIG I have seen some wild interpretations and mistakes that lead to rather strange interpretations of what I considered was clearly written instruction.   But this group are a highly 'regularised' body   (in themselves, not generally ....  as  'Regular Masons ' . ) 

I think, some masonic groups are free to change the ritual (regionally under GL jurisdiction )  as the will .    

"  Each Grand Lodge sets its own definition of what these landmarks are, and thus what is Regular and what is Irregular (and the definitions do not necessarily agree between Grand Lodges). "     https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freemasonry#Regularity

We can't deviate from the spoken word, but our movements in the ritual can be altered at the Master's discretion. 

I also didn't think you guys could write ritual down, that's why I said not sure...

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20 hours ago, back to earth said:

No,  we too are not allowed to write out or copy the scripts .   Initiation ritual scripts are distributed by Grand Lodge to approved initiators only and they retain ownership of them. This is to ensure regularisation of ritual in all bodies.  It is also forbidden to deviate, add or subtract from the script.  On a body closing, the material has to be returned. 

When officers are learning their parts, they learn off that script, when practicing they are  tested to see if they are following the script. To rely on a single person's memory of getting the whole of 8  ( the usual number of rites done in such a Lodge ) lengthy  ritual scripts  (including regalia, and the temple layout and furniture and objects (including regulation sizes )  is not something I would personally ( and International Lodge )  would not be happy with or confident about . 

This agrees with my understanding.  The regalia symbolism is complicated and there's lengthy passages to memorize.  If you had to sit down with someone and get them to memorize it orally, it would take far too long.

 

 

 

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4 hours ago, MstrMsn said:

We can't deviate from the spoken word, but our movements in the ritual can be altered at the Master's discretion. 

I also didn't think you guys could write ritual down, that's why I said not sure...

You can't write it down, but they do have official printed manuscripts.

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20 minutes ago, Kenemet said:

You can't write it down, but they do have official printed manuscripts.

In BTE's type of Freemasonry, yes. In regular Freemasonry, no, not written out. The ritualist for Grand Lodge does have a shorthand (cipher) printed out, but anyone that doesn't know the ritual can't read it. 

Any fully written version of our ritual is not allowed. Have people done it? Yes. Can they be kicked out for it? Yes. Unless Grand Lodge authorizes it, which is unlikely.

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46 minutes ago, Kenemet said:

This agrees with my understanding.  The regalia symbolism is complicated and there's lengthy passages to memorize.  If you had to sit down with someone and get them to memorize it orally, it would take far too long.

 

 

 

Our ritual isn't the same as Rainbow's, or DeMolay's. The only time our regalia is mentioned is when our officers are being installed, and even then, it's just something short, like "as Jr. Warden, the symbol of your office is the plum" and "which we use to remind us to walk and be upright Masons" or some version. But, it's not long, and the only people that really learn this are installation teams.

Most of our officers don't have any ritual to learn, only the line officers, and the first time a line officer has to know any ritual is when he becomes the Jr Deacon, which is the 4th from the bottom. Now, these are 1 years terms, so you will have been a line officer and going to rehearsals for 3 years prior to need to know what to say. And even then, it's only 1 or 2 lines. 

Learning orally isn't as difficult as you make it seem.

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4 hours ago, Kenemet said:

This agrees with my understanding.  The regalia symbolism is complicated and there's lengthy passages to memorize.  If you had to sit down with someone and get them to memorize it orally, it would take far too long.

 

Indeed . but ... and I certainly supposing here  ....    that would depend on the Lodge 'work'  if thats all they have to do, then ....  also, in the modern world ( ie now )   I doubt many have time for such things .  

I learnt my parts so I could do  them  without script .....    but back then, I  was not working full time, no family, and basic necessities met , still it dominated a large part of my life at the time.   Also if there was a longer gap between them I had to review. 

 

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3 hours ago, MstrMsn said:

Our ritual isn't the same as Rainbow's, or DeMolay's. The only time our regalia is mentioned is when our officers are being installed, and even then, it's just something short, like "as Jr. Warden, the symbol of your office is the plum" and "which we use to remind us to walk and be upright Masons" or some version. But, it's not long, and the only people that really learn this are installation teams.

Most of our officers don't have any ritual to learn, only the line officers, and the first time a line officer has to know any ritual is when he becomes the Jr Deacon, which is the 4th from the bottom. Now, these are 1 years terms, so you will have been a line officer and going to rehearsals for 3 years prior to need to know what to say. And even then, it's only 1 or 2 lines. 

Learning orally isn't as difficult as you make it seem.

 

 I agree,  for a 'junior' officer .   But learning all  of the first 3  as a Master  ( and being responsible for the others correct performance)  is  a LOT more extensive. 

I believe K  ( and me ) are referring to the ritual as a whole   not  singular occasional minor parts.

 

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Posted (edited)

On 5/24/2017 at 8:02 PM, back to earth said:

 

 I agree,  for a 'junior' officer .   But learning all  of the first 3  as a Master  ( and being responsible for the others correct performance)  is  a LOT more extensive. 

I believe K  ( and me ) are referring to the ritual as a whole   not  singular occasional minor parts.

 

Most of the Lodges I've been to (as well as mine) the Master does the first section, and farms out other portions of the second and third sections to other Past Masters and our Ritualist. 

My Lodge also does our degree work in November, April and September. So we generally have the time to learn it. Some of us also meet outside of the normal rehearsal day.  It's not easy, but it is doable.

Edited by MstrMsn
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Posted (edited)

It is important when discussing freemasonry that the master mason obligation is not violated. There are many false statements being posted. Here are the facts of freemasonry that are relevant.

Freemasons are a fraternity of men. Who take good men and make them better.

Freemason have a dedication to charity. Specifically raising money to help kids that need it. Here is a explanation of them.

1. Books for bikes. It challenges kids to read by rewarding the winners with new bikes.

 

2. Chip which stands for the child identification program. It is intended to help parents in case of a missing child alert. In my opinion only, the program is unneeded. In most cases the records would be recorded anyway with a pediatrician. Next what it come down too is a group of masons setting up  for instance, at pizza ranch. Then asking parents if its ok to chip there kids. While reassuring them the results are only given to the parents. I really feel the program is old fashioned and furthermore adds to the community's suspensions of freemasonry. I have communicated this to masonic leaders but can not be specific due to my obligation. 

3. There is a program where masons work together with school facility and counselors to help identify kids that need it. Specifically to help prevent suicide.   

4. Also there is a program that helps widowed masons with basically whatever can, are could be offered. 

Finally a master mason meeting is conducted the same today, as it was when George Washington was worshipful master of his lodge. Freemasonry is not a church or a religion. Members are usually prominent businessmen, attorneys, politicians, athletes, educators, law enforcement, but your job doesn't matter. Every member is on the level. Masons today take the same approach as the masons did when the declaration of independence was signed. Those who have the ability to do the right thing. Have the responsibility too.  

 

One thing that is open to discussion is the ancient history of freemasonry. It is not discussed at meetings. The creation of freemasonry and the mysterious men involved. King Solomon,  His grand builder H. A. ,The night's templar including Jaque De molay and the remnants of his order. That it what is interesting. Even a possible connection can be made between  Moses and King Solomon. The connection being the Ark of the covenant and staff of Moses. If the connection could be verified it would prove that  Exodus is a true historical event. 

Edited by Lightspeed75

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14 hours ago, Lightspeed75 said:

Freemasons are a fraternity of men. Who take good men and make them better.

That's funny. I know a porn site catering solely to gentlemen that makes the same claim. 

--Jaylemurph

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Posted (edited)

It seems you are present at all the 'important occasions ' . 

 

Spoiler

Image result for Basset hound as a freemason

 

Edited by back to earth

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