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Khaemwaset

Did Children Build Akhetaten?

57 posts in this topic

42 minutes ago, kmt_sesh said:

A fair question. First it's important to understand that Habiru is what Levantines and Mesopotamians called them, while the Egyptian variant is Apiru. So there's consistency there,  The word originally developed in the Akkadian tongue around the 18th century BCE and fell out of use by the 11th century BCE, so right about the time the first Hebrews were emerging in the Levant. The word means "migrant," although later it took on the derogatory meaning "bandit. Hebrew means "to cross over" or "pass through," so there's definitely a different shade of meaning. A big difference is, the Hebrews called themselves by this name (as well as others) while the bandits of the Habiru were given that name by others. But the biggest point is, again, the Habiru emerged too early to have been the Hebrews, and they were not of the same ethnicity or language.

I once explained all this in more detail in this old thread.

 There were the Hebrews that came out of Babylon that claimed to be speaking different languages  

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Just now, docyabut2 said:

 There were the Hebrews that came out of Babylon that claimed the story  to be  of speaking different languages  

 

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Amarna contained LHIIIA1 pottery from the reign of Amenhotep III; and also contained LHIIIA2 pottery from the reign of Akhenaten.  Perhaps this indicates that Amenhotep III had built something at Amarna, before Akhenaten's huge construction project.  If so, this would provide a longer time for burying people in the Amarna cemeteries.

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2 hours ago, atalante said:

Amarna contained LHIIIA1 pottery from the reign of Amenhotep III; and also contained LHIIIA2 pottery from the reign of Akhenaten.  Perhaps this indicates that Amenhotep III had built something at Amarna, before Akhenaten's huge construction project.  If so, this would provide a longer time for burying people in the Amarna cemeteries.

Akhenaten began the construction of his city in Year 5, and completed it three or four years later. He deliberately wanted a virgin site, In fact, of the extensive excavations conducted there, no indication of building projects or settlement patterns are evident from before Akhenaten's reign. But the presence of ceramics from the time of Amunhotep III wouldn't be at all surprising, given that there must've been a lot of it floating around the houses, palace, and temples (so long as all inferences of the name "Amun" were wiped out there). It would also depend on whether you're in favor of a long co-regency with Amunhotep III and Akhenaten, or no co-regency. If the former, it's altogether possible Amunhotep III and his retinue visited Akhetaten on several occasions. As for myself, I remain undecided on the co-regency question, although it's a hot-button issue with numerous Egyptologists.

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Four different threads concurrently about ancient history and especially ancient Egypt. I like this!

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I needed to make a point of clarification that I forgot to mention before. Specifically, LHIIA pottery (1 and 2) is not Egyptian but Mycenaean. Just a fussy note and not of terrible importance, because there's plentiful evidence for Mycenaean material culture in Egypt. Whether that means Mycenaeans were resident at Amarna or the ceramics ended up there through trade is not always known with certainty.

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Posted (edited)

On 6/7/2017 at 2:34 AM, back to earth said:

Its an interesting contrast to other places , like  the 'workman's villages '    ( whatever the real name is for what I am thinking of  :huh: )

 

On 6/7/2017 at 8:11 PM, Khaemwaset said:

A 2015 article in USA Today about the Amarna commoners' cemeteries' skeletons, noting some bore the scars of execution, and also the prevalent presence of malnutrition and its related diseases such as scurvy:https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2015/10/13/egypt-cemetery-punishment-lashes-wounds/73688038/

Note the malnutrition and related diseases present in the Amarna cemeteries.  And as back to earth mentioned, is it not an interesting contrast to elsewhere where we have found workers' remains in Ancient Egypt?  Why was Amarna different...yes, the work was always difficult for those doing the heavy lifting, but is malnutrition present in the workers' remains at Giza. Western Thebes, etc?  I don't think I've ever read that (but I don't read much, so there's that.) 

Though as to plagues, I do remember reading 'A DIstant Mirror' by Barbara Tuchman years ago, in which she posited (among many things) that a quarter of Europe (and the world so-to-speak) died because of the simultaneous outbreak of Bubonic and its cadet infection Pneumonic Plagues in the fourteenth century CE, leading to the rapid spread and the multiple symptoms reported.  Amarna could have experienced something like that I suppose.  So here's a link to a 2004 article in National Geographic, tracing bubonic plague to Egypt and Amarna, by examining insect remains: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2004/03/0310_040310_blackdeath.html    

From page 2 of the article:

In Egypt Panagiotakopulu combed the workers'-village site in Amarna, where the builders of the tombs of Egyptian kings Tutankhamun and Akhenaton lived. There, the researcher unearthed cat and human fleas—known to be plague carriers in some cases—in and around the workers' homes. That find spurred Panagiotakopulu to believe that the bubonic plague's fleaborne bacteria could also have been lurking in the area, so she went in search of other clues.

Previous excavations along the Nile Delta had turned up Nile rats, an endemic species, dating to the 16th and 17th century B.C. The plague's main carrier flea is thought to be native to the Nile Valley and is known to be a Nile rat parasite.

 

Edited by Khaemwaset
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