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Still Waters

Trophy hunting part-funds 6,000 park animals

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Call it Noah’s Ark on lorries. Dozens of trucks rolled over the Zimbabwe savanna carrying elephants, giraffe, African buffalo, zebras, and numerous other large iconic mammals. Driving more than 600km of dusty roadway, the trucks will deliver their wild loads to a new home: Zinave national park in Mozambique.

The animals are a donation from Mozambique’s Sango Wildlife Conservancy – a gift that the owner, Wilfried Pabst, says would not be possible without funds from controversial trophy hunting.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/radical-conservation/2017/jun/19/rewilding-mozambique-trophy-hunting-elephants-giraffe-poaching-zimbabwe-sango-save-zinave

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I'm not suprised. Like we always demonize trophy hunters but I'm sure they don't want those animals to go extinct either 

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The depths people will stoop to to justify their appallingly cruel activity never ceases to amaze me.

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20 hours ago, ouija ouija said:

The depths people will stoop to to justify their appallingly cruel activity never ceases to amaze me.

Perhaps a necessary evil.  If trophy hunting provides a good portion of the funds needed to help these animals, then that is a tough challenge.   Makes you wonder.   What if a billionaire offered to match the money Mozambique takes in from trophy hunting if they would stop.  

After a quick search, I have no idea how much that would be.  This site seems to have conflicting numbers.  427 hunters per year, but only $622,000?  That's an average of less than $1500.   Either they are hiding funds or they are charging too little a price.  

In the last 10 years, Mozambique recorded an average of 427 prospective hunters per year.

In terms of revenue, Correia said Mozambique raised about US$622,000 last year from issuing hunting licenses, providing hunter-guides, selling slaughter passwords, paying farm fees and issuing certificates of the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).

http://apanews.net/en/news/mozambique-plans-to-resume-trophy-hunting

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Just now, Myles said:

What if a billionaire offered to match the money Mozambique takes in from trophy hunting if they would stop.  

Yeah im really ready for the ultra rich to actually put their money where their mouths are on environmental issues. 

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10 minutes ago, Farmer77 said:

Yeah im really ready for the ultra rich to actually put their money where their mouths are on environmental issues. 

It seems it doesn't have to be a billionaire.  Mozambique claim only $622,000 per year.    C'mon Sarah McLachlan, step it up.  :D

You know, she has a net worth of over $45 million dollars.   So leaving $5 million for herself, she could end trophy hunting in Mozambique for over 40 years.

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There is no way to justify trophy hunting. Who does it serve other then feed the killers uneducated, childish ego...bragging rights. Chicken sh t  hunting techniques ambushing unwary animals with heavy guage arsenal..anyone can do it. Get yourself in the right spot and pull the trigger..yeah it takes a real man to do this...whatever. I enjoy wild meat.Where I live there are ample populations of deer and moose, as well as game fish.I can agree with  hunting for this reason alone and it being properly regulated. But to blow away an animal for personal gratification is sick and messed up. Any efforts to justify it is wrong. If this is the only way Mozambique can fund there conservation programs then we have a long way to go..

 

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31 minutes ago, khol said:

There is no way to justify trophy hunting. Who does it serve other then feed the killers uneducated, childish ego...bragging rights. Chicken sh t  hunting techniques ambushing unwary animals with heavy guage arsenal..anyone can do it. Get yourself in the right spot and pull the trigger..yeah it takes a real man to do this...whatever. I enjoy wild meat.Where I live there are ample populations of deer and moose, as well as game fish.I can agree with  hunting for this reason alone and it being properly regulated. But to blow away an animal for personal gratification is sick and messed up. Any efforts to justify it is wrong. If this is the only way Mozambique can fund there conservation programs then we have a long way to go..

 

I think it has already been established that it serves the fund for animal conservation.  

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Right it does at that.. I guess my point is the irony of it. And also there are better ways of aquiring these funds

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1 minute ago, khol said:

Right it does at that.. I guess my point is the irony of it. And also there are better ways of aquiring these funds

Such as? Go out and try to raise that money through donations - I would be surprised if you could collect half of what hunters generate. Our world renowned wildlife management programs cannot survive without hunter's dollars and that is a fact. Even more so in Africa where there is little to no Government money put in to conservation.

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