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RabidMongoose

Pompeii House of the Ephebe

92 posts in this topic

3 hours ago, susieice said:

Well, if you look at the mosaic, one has a tuft, the one behind it does not.

Maybe removing the tuft would help in identification ?

notuft.JPG.5470e6a0b21b3d9ab5b1b5c590362f9f.JPG

(Yes I had difficulty clipping freehand).

MDagger

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8 hours ago, susieice said:

So there's 2 of them there.

 

Maybe ... 2 pinecones , the one at the back is shown smaller  as it is , or it is supposed to help the perspective of the mosaic . 

I am not convinced that the 'tuft'  is attached to the 'fruit' / 'cone' 

0_Mosaico_pavimentale_%E2%80%93_Grotte_C

 

Look closely , it is not 'centered' over the top of the 'fruit' , it might be herbs,  plant, decor, as on the other end of the plate . 

 Or  ' garnish '  as it's called nowadays .

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Thing is , I have eaten local pine nuts ,  Bunya pine nuts,   Lebanese pine nuts ....  and never has , a local , an Aboriginal  or  a Lebanese had them on offer as food or nibbles    in the cone   . 

 

 

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4 hours ago, MDagger said:

Maybe removing the tuft would help in identification ?

notuft.JPG.5470e6a0b21b3d9ab5b1b5c590362f9f.JPG

(Yes I had difficulty clipping freehand).

MDagger

 

 

Image result for ancient roman raisin bun

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1 hour ago, back to earth said:

 

 

Image result for ancient roman raisin bun

I think that guy in the middle is carrying a tray of bread. But nice toga-type garment. I'm wearing one just like it right now. The knot rides against my hip a bit too snugly.

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you know... if the Romans had a trade route to South America it's quite possible that they also had ham and pineapple pizzas.

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5 minutes ago, Captain Risky said:

you know... if the Romans had a trade route to South America it's quite possible that they also had ham and pineapple pizzas.

Ham? Fine. But the last thing you should ever put on a pizza is pineapple.

One of the last things.

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You know I've heard this argument before... I can't see how pizza would fall into some type of puritanical law.

pineapple is yummy. Ham is yummy. Hot bread is yummy. Sauce is yummy. What's not to like? 

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1 minute ago, Captain Risky said:

...pineapple is yummy. Ham is yummy. Hot bread is yummy. Sauce is yummy. What's not to like? 

All of that is yummy—except pineapple. I don't know why. I love fruit and eat it all the time, but never liked pineapple. Don't like either the taste or the texture.

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46 minutes ago, kmt_sesh said:

All of that is yummy—except pineapple. I don't know why. I love fruit and eat it all the time, but never liked pineapple. Don't like either the taste or the texture.

Okaay. For a second I thought you were one of those purists that only likes the traditional Italian pizza varieties. You know thou... from the looks of that mosaic the Romans liked their pineapple too. What do you think it is?

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From the tuff on the end and the size I"d guess it was a pomegranate displaying stylized pips on it's surface that are concealed until the fruit is opened.

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1 hour ago, Captain Risky said:

you know... if the Romans had a trade route to South America it's quite possible that they also had ham and pineapple pizzas.

Around here we call them Hawaiian Pizzas.

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Posted (edited)

5 hours ago, back to earth said:

Thing is , I have eaten local pine nuts ,  Bunya pine nuts,   Lebanese pine nuts ....  and never has , a local , an Aboriginal  or  a Lebanese had them on offer as food or nibbles    in the cone   . 

 

 

Yes. In one of your previous posts, you said they had to be roasted to get the nuts out. I would think that would already be done and put in a separate dish. I would expect olives to be on the plate before a pine cone. The tuft may be more centered between the two. The other end of the plate shows fig leaves coming off the figs. What type of garnish would you use to set off a pine cone? They ate quite a variety of nuts.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ancient_Roman_cuisine

From the link:

The ancient Romans ate walnuts, almonds, hazel nuts, pine nuts, chestnuts and sesame seeds, which they sometimes pulverized to thicken spiced, sweet wine sauces for roast meat and fowl. Nuts and fruit were used in pastries, tarts and puddings sweetened with honey.

Pine nuts is there but why serve the pine cone?

Edited by susieice
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2 hours ago, kmt_sesh said:

Ham? Fine. But the last thing you should ever put on a pizza is pineapple.

One of the last things.

 

Oh no .... you obviously have not been to 'Pimpama Gourmet Pizzas '       ( gourmet means they cost a lot ) . I looked on the menu in the window .... one 'pizza' (cant remember the name )  had   ....

 

   You better sit down first   ....

 

alfalfa sprouts and  sliced banana on it   .   

 

I would pick you as a 'cheeseburger crust pizza '  type of guy 

 

Image result for pizza with cheeseburger crust

 

( if you get two and turn one over , you can make a big sandwich out of them   :)   )  

 

 

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2 hours ago, kmt_sesh said:

All of that is yummy—except pineapple. I don't know why. I love fruit and eat it all the time, but never liked pineapple. Don't like either the taste or the texture.

Nasty accident with one , as a kid  ?  

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45 minutes ago, susieice said:

Around here we call them Hawaiian Pizzas.

There ya go !    proof of  yet another risky theory !

Hawaii was the stop over point for the Romans on their way to Sth America . 

Now , I know you are going to say that is the long way 'around '    but they actually had to make a stop over before that . 

 

Otherwise Romans would  never have had  their  kangaroo tail pies  . 

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2 minutes ago, back to earth said:

Hawaii was the stop over point for the Romans on their way to Sth America

Probably why they pinapples are so small had to pick them green so they wouldn't spoil before they got home to make pizza and smoke some Columbian.:innocent:

jmccr8

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Ah heck , lets go all the way  .

The  ancient Egyptians had pizza too !  

of course    the shape was a little different  ..... 

 

 

Image result for ancient egyptian  pizza

 

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37 minutes ago, jmccr8 said:

Probably why they pinapples are so small had to pick them green so they wouldn't spoil before they got home to make pizza and smoke some Columbian.:innocent:

jmccr8

 

Its the now extinct  ' cherry pineapple '  , very small, just bigger than a few grapes   ;)  

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1 hour ago, susieice said:

Around here we call them Hawaiian Pizzas.

Same. But in Australia, Queensland specifically, we grow pineapples here. So they should be called Queenslander's. And on that note I hope NSW win tonight.

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Posted (edited)

Oh my God !  I nearly forgot ! 

 

It's the ' State of Origin '  Qld  Vs  NSW   pineapple throwing competition !    :o 

 

Piney-throwing.jpg

 

 

Dont try it  at home  kids  ! 

Spoiler

Image result for pineapple throwing

 

Edited by back to earth
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12 hours ago, back to earth said:

 

17 hours ago, MDagger said:

Maybe removing the tuft would help in identification ?

notuft.JPG.5470e6a0b21b3d9ab5b1b5c590362f9f.JPG

(Yes I had difficulty clipping freehand).

MDagger

 

Image result for ancient roman raisin bun

Well maybe we should leave the tuft on this one.... and I won't attempt freehand.

MDagger

 

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11 hours ago, kmt_sesh said:

All of that is yummy—except pineapple. I don't know why. I love fruit and eat it all the time, but never liked pineapple. Don't like either the taste or the texture.

Ah well we must disagree I'm an old fan of pineapple, Canadian ham, mushrooms and garlic on pizza

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Just a note none of the famous Roman writers mentioned pineapples (had they existed they would of course had another name) or described anything like it especially not even writing attributed to followers of Epicurus. Nor did Cato and Pliny* in their writings and encyclopedia's don't mention them either, nor any mysterious fruit that cannot be ID.

* Pliny's Natural History

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_History_(Pliny)#Agriculture

 

 

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14 minutes ago, Hanslune said:

Just a note none of the famous Roman writers mentioned pineapples (had they existed they would of course had another name) or described anything like it especially not even writing attributed to followers of Epicurus. Nor did Cato and Pliny* in their writings and encyclopedia's don't mention them either, nor any mysterious fruit that cannot be ID.

* Pliny's Natural History

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_History_(Pliny)#Agriculture

 

 

There are some written accounts where pineapple was used in Europe to refer to pinecones prior to contact with the Americas. I believe Colavito cites a specific instance or two in his blog entry about this mosaic.

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