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How to watch a total eclipse

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A look at the best way to watch the upcoming total solar eclipse in the US on August 21st.

 

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How to safely watch a solar eclipse? Buy the eclipse glasses on Amazon. I got 10 for $10 and will share them with people I know (kids and adults) who will watch it. They are the ones that look like old 3-D glasses, made of cardboard.

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The TSE is tomorrow...so I had to revive this thread (40 days and 40 nights later, LOL). You have 3 choices to view the sun safely: 1. buy special filtered sun eclipse glasses ($4 USD on the internet), 2. make an eclipse box with cardboard-poke a hole in the cardboard to let the sun shine on a piece of paper inside the box (I learned to make this in middle school science class), and 3. the TV or internet - the Big Bear Lake solar observatory in So CA will be featured on local media.

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NASA Eclipse Live Stream here

There will be live streams from 57 high altitude balloons as well!

:tu:

 

 

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Posted (edited)

Welders glass of grade 12 or more is also fine.  While 13 or 14 is often recommended that level reduces the light levels a bit much, imo.  Note, some cheap welders glass suffers from quality issues and may give a distorted or doubled image, so if you have the choice, buy the proper glasses.

I'll admit that when I saw my first eclipse (1976), I watched it without protection for a second or so before totality, and then the same afterwards before going back to the glasses.  I did have a little bright spot left for a while, but no permanent damage.  Just remember that even a tiny sliver of sunlight is quite dangerous.  That sliver is the same intensity as full sunlight, but because it is quite dark your pupils are wide open, so the 'safe' amount of time is very, very short before you run the risk of permanent damage - and that damage will be right where you don't want it in your central vision.

The other problem is that most folks (me included!!!) find the event absolutely breathtaking and hypnotically beautiful, so there's a tendency to forget to be careful with your eyes...

Good luck to you all - I really hope you get clear skies, and be prepared for something quite astonishingly wondrous..

 

Edited by ChrLzs

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Posted (edited)

It's ok everyone!!!  The prez (term used loosely) sets the example...

http://www.9news.com.au/world/2017/08/22/06/33/trump-looks-at-eclipse-without-glasses

(I know, it's 'fake news'...  what he did, namely glancing briefly at the Sun, is safe...)

Edited by ChrLzs

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Posted (edited)

We were disappointed with our 40% coverage here, we heard it was going to be 75%. .

Edited by .ZZ.

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6 minutes ago, ChrLzs said:

It's ok everyone!!!  The prez (term used loosely) sets the example...

http://www.9news.com.au/world/2017/08/22/06/33/trump-looks-at-eclipse-without-glasses

(I know, it's 'fake news'...  what he did, namely glancing briefly at the Sun, is safe...)

:clap:

Is there still anyone who is in the opinion that his IQ is >70?

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48 minutes ago, .ZZ. said:

We were disappointed with our 40% coverage here, we heard it was going to be 75%. .

I've checked, and you should have seen approx 70% coverage from Houston.  The problem is I think they measure it by diameter covered, and that leaves an awful lot of bright sun by area, so it did probably look like less coverage.

Sadly, partial eclipses like that, where the daylight just goes a bit dimmer, do not remotely compare to the experience of a total eclipse...

 

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