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Angels-Summer

The knights of the Bafomet

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Who are The Knights of the Bafomet?

© 2014 Grupo Simbolico

 

Introduction

 

A recent discovery has shed light on a 700-year-old society so secret that its existence was previously known only through a half-dozen historical references.  Calling itself The Blood Order of the Bafomet, the members are apparently called The Knights of the Bafomet or the Bafometters, and their meetings are held in temples called Bafomeria (each temple is a Bafomerium). Until the papers of a Nineteenth Century Austrian eccentric were discovered in 2013, very little was known about the order; it was said to be so secretive that if a member revealed any of the Order’s secrets, his entire Bafomerium (also the term for the members of a given temple) could be executed on the order of the Grand Bafomerium (the head temple). Further, the temple itself would be destroyed and the ground under it plowed with salt.

 

Recorded History

 

The first references to the Knights of the Bafomet were around 1100 AD, during the First Crusade. The Bafometters were said to be the “enforcers” of the Knights Templar, charged with “special operations” (in today’s term) against Muslims and other enemies. One contemporary source, Odo de St. Amand, claimed that the first Bafometters were personally chosen by the founder of the Knights Templar, Hugues de Payens, for their ferocity in battle. Another contemporary source, Jenquiere d’Allois, said that Bafomet assassins were known to leave their victims disemboweled, with their intestines around their throats and their hands and feet bound by their own tendons.

 

According to an account by Bernard de Tramelay, an early Grand Master of the Knights Templar who was killed and beheaded during the Battle of Ascalon in 1153, Bafometters often acted as shock troops, charging the enemy ahead of the main Christian army to break up enemy battle lines. One of their most famous battles was in 1177, during the Battle of Montgisard, where some 100 Knights of the Bafomet led 500 Templars and 4000 Christian infantry to victory against Saladin's army of more than 26,000 Moslems.

 

D’Allois quotes an unnamed source that Bafometters were known for the human skull-caps they fixed to their helmets: “‘They are fearsome in aspect (in battle). . .many display the crania of slain enemies on their helmets. . .(t)he Musselman fears the Bafometters and calls them aldhiab m’alshaytan (wolves of the devil).’”

 

The Weschler Papers

 

The Blood Order of the Bafomet disappeared from history between 1307 and the discovery of “The Weschler Papers” in 2013, except for a grisly incident in Stuttgart, Germany in 1914, and a strange account of devil-worship in rural Yell County, Arkansas in 1939. The Weschler Papers were found among the effects of one Ernst Weschler, an eccentric recluse who’d died in Vienna in 1868, when a descendant, Hubert Weschler of Stuttgart, Germany, contacted a Berlin antiquities collector about selling a medieval suit of armor that he’d inherited.

 

The collector bought the suit of armor and Mr. Weschler threw in a canvas bag of papers that he’d inherited along with the armor. The collector gave the bag to a researcher, who found that it contained a bundle of notes primarily concerned with the history of the Bafometters. Aware of the Order’s bloody history and fearsome reputation, he released the notes anonymously, with a cover note stating that they had been written in a simple transposition code that he’d had little trouble deciphering.

It appears that Ernst Weschler had been the Zawl Qarin, or custodian, of the Vienna Bafomerium. It may be that he also had responsibility for the Bafomerium’s artifacts: one of the papers in the bag was a Stuttgart police report indicating that the residence of one Hubert Weschler in the Bad Cannstatt area of Stuttgart had been burglarized during the night of August 8, 1890, but that the only item taken was a human finger-bone in an inlaid wooden box. Hubert Weschler told the police that he’d inherited the finger-bone from his grandfather, Ernst Weschler, along with a number of other items, unspecified.

 

Ernst Weschler’s abbreviated account is the only written record of the Order after 1307, so it cannot be verified. However, it does comport with known information about the Knights Templar, the Bafometters of the early Crusades, and the Great Purge of Friday, October 13, 1307 (the origin of today’s fear of Friday the Thirteenth), when King Philip IV of France ordered the execution of all Knights Templar in France.

 

The following is a summary of Weschler’s notes:

 

In the dark days that followed The Night of the Great Purge, most of the Knights Templar were rounded up and burned at the stake, but—perhaps due to their military prowess—many Bafometters fought back, and a number, variously estimated between 100 and 400, managed to flee to Germany. There, they formally joined together in The Blood Order of the Bafomet on January 14, 1308. The ceremony was held at midnight in the Westfriedhof Cemetary in Magdeburg, Germany. De Payens’ bones, which had been jealously guarded by generations of Bafometters since de Payens’ death in 1136, were then distributed to the members, who were told to disperse and become one with their new fellow-citizens, to assume the mantle of poverty under the Fourth Tenet of the Bafomet, and to keep the Blood Order of the Bafomet alive.

 

Weschler wrote that the “broken star” adopted by the Bafometters as their icon sometime during the Fourteenth Century symbolized the Order’s break with both the Knights Templar and the Christian faith (the Third Tenet of the Bafomet forbids the worship of any god but the Bafomet).

 

There are 206 bones in the adult human body, and Weschler wrote that 200 bones had been distributed in the Magdeburg Cemetary, with the skull going to a man who later founded the Hamburg (Germany) Bafomerium, which was to become the Grand Bafomerium. Each Bafomerium must have in its possession at least one of de Payens’ bones; it appears that the bone stolen from Hubert Weschler in 1890 was de Payens’, and had probably belonged to the Vienna Bafomerium.

 

Ernst Weschler’s notes indicated that, during his tenure as Zawl Qarin, there were 154 Bafomeria in various places around the world, with seven in Germany and Austria and the others in places like Istanbul, London, Moscow, Mumbai, Washington, DC, and even Florianopolis, Brazil. The membership roll in a Bafomerium during his time ranged from a dozen men to over a hundred.

 

The researcher stated that a number of other papers, including some documents of antiquity, were found in the bag, but—in an unusual lapse for a researcher—he did not describe them fully. However, he did write that one of the papers seemed to be an original, hand-written list, in French, of “The Five Tenets of the Bafomet” (as the list was titled), which he described as:

1.                  No knight may reveal any information about the Order;

2.                  Each knight must defend every other knight to the death;

3.                  Each knight must swear fealty to the Bafomet and foreswear all gods;

4.                  Each knight must assume the mantle of poverty, and

5.                  No knight may do an immoral thing.

 

The Vlodinski Affair

 

The next known reference to the Bafometters came in 1914, in Germany, during the chaotic days leading up to World War I. Apparently, according to Stuttgart police reports, a man named Piet Vlodinski, a German of Polish extraction living in Stuttgart, had been known around town to claim, while in his cups, that at one time he’d been a Bafometter and that he’d attended a Bafomerium in Stuttgart. Persons interviewed by the police said that Vlodinski had provided remarkably detailed descriptions of Bafometter rituals. For example, one witness said Vlodinski had told him that the members of a Bafomerium wear suits of chain mail at their meetings and carry swords and shields, that they worship the pagan god Bafomet, and that decisions within a Bafomerium are made by “casting the bone”, or using a human bone to make predictions or affect the future.

 

One aspect of the Vlodinski affair seems to comport with a particularly grisly trademark of the Bafometters: the police report states that Vlodinski’s body was found on the morning of July 29, 1914, in Stuttgart’s Schlossgarten Park, his intestines wrapped around his throat and his hands and feet bound by their tendons. In the following days, a dozen more male citizens of Stuttgart were murdered in various ways, but the outbreak of World War I quickly relegated the deaths to the back page. None of the other bodies had been disfigured like Vlodinski’s, and no definite connection between them and Vlodinski was ever established.

 

Devil-Worship in Yell County: A Personal Note

 

In the course of researching the history of the Bafometters for this article, I became aware of a recent posting in a Christian chatroom referring to a sighting of a statue of the Bafomet in the United States. I was able to contact the author of the post, a woman in Belleville, Arkansas, who said her grandfather had told her, shortly before his death, about a huge statue of a demon or devil that he’d seen on a neighboring farm in his youth. She had described it in the chatroom to see if anyone had heard of anything similar.

 

The woman—I’ll call her Mrs. Painter—agreed to meet with me in person. I traveled to Belleville and met her at her residence. I found her a credible source, stable and well-respected in the community. However, she did insist that her name, the name of her grandfather, and the names of any Yell County citizens who might have been involved be withheld from this article. I agreed to the condition.

 

Mrs. Painter said her grandfather had lived on a farm a few miles outside of town as a young man, that he’d often walked the trails of the rugged, mountainous area for relaxation, and that he had once spied on a neighbor’s farm, owned by a German immigrant, in the hope of catching sight of the man’s attractive daughter. She believed this would have been shortly before World War II.

 

While in hiding, her grandfather saw a number of men—speaking a foreign language, wearing chain-mail armor, and carrying shields on their backs—pulling a huge statue of a demon out of a barn. They then took positions around the statue with their swords and shields raised and conducted some kind of pagan ritual. The statue, which he estimated at fourteen to sixteen feet tall, had a man’s body and a goat’s head. He said he became frightened and ran away, and never spied on the neighbor’s farm again.

 

Mrs. Painter was able to identify the location of the farm in question. I found it at the end of an unused lane in a rugged, heavily wooded area. A house, a barn, and several other outbuildings were situated on the property, all in poor condition. The place was posted against trespassing, but I entered on foot and examined the buildings. The farmhouse appeared to have been an ordinary residence. It was unlocked and missing the back door. It was empty except for some building debris.

 

The barn was also in poor condition, with the roof mostly fallen in and the walls heavily rotted. However, I noted an unusual aperture fitted into the back wall, facing a narrow strip of flat ground, with a large door extending to the loft and a concealed flap above the door. It appeared that the aperture had been constructed to allow a very tall object to be moved in and out of the barn upright. However, I found nothing else of interest on the property.

 

A visit to the Yell County Courthouse in Danville revealed the identity of the farm’s owner during the years before World War II. He had a fairly common German/Prussian name. Immigration records show that he’d come to the US from Stuttgart, Germany, in 1919. The 1940 census listed him at the farm’s address with a wife and two daughters, aged twelve and sixteen.

 

Yell County land records show that the owner sold the property in 1951. He and his wife must have moved away, for I haven’t found any record of their deaths, but his daughters died in nearby towns in 1994 and 2002. I have identified some of their descendants but have not attempted to contact them.

 

Conclusion—Or Not

 

It may be difficult to believe that an organization that must have contained thousands of men over the centuries, that may have thousands of men in its rolls today—including professional assassins who have changed or will change the course of history—could be so secret. Certainly the harsh punishment for members who reveal the Order’s secrets may have something to do with it, and even journalists and other non-members must consider possible consequences for revealing information about the Bafometters.

In spite of this, I don’t intend to give up.

 

A Journalist

May 14, 2014

READ MORE: http://www.disclose.tv/board/bafometters-t113418.html

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Still a hoax.

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38 minutes ago, Kenemet said:

Still a hoax.

Beat me to it.

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2 hours ago, Angels-Summer said:

According to an account by Bernard de Tramelay

What account would that be?  I couldn't find anything in the Wiki.

 

2 hours ago, Angels-Summer said:

Another contemporary source, Jenquiere d’Allois, said that Bafomet assassins were known to leave their victims disemboweled, with their intestines around their throats and their hands and feet bound by their own tendons.

 

Who is Jenquiere d’Allois?  And what's the citation for the relevant document?

 

Etc. etc. etc.

What Kenemet says ...

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(laugh) I just noticed... "Jenquiere d’Allois"... "Je ne quer" is "I don't explain."  and possibly "vamoose."  Someone with colloquial French correct me.

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Not more Barometers!

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Well the order is clearly not doing a very good job of keeping its secrets since information about it is available on the Internet.

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1 hour ago, Tinfoil hat said:

Well the order is clearly not doing a very good job of keeping its secrets since information about it is available on the Internet.

...that's the problem with literally every bit of conspiridiotcy. 

--Jaylemurph

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Posted (edited)

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSlyITbCNUkT_sfoaUjnC8

Edited by back to earth

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I ask Rupert about this and he said crude and rude things to me. In other words he doesn't like to be bothers over nonsense. So in revenge I sprinkled some catnip over his can home and my cat took to licking it madly and bating at it and rubbing against until it fell off the monitor and landed on the floor and rolled under the desk where there are a large number of dust bunnies, petrified bits and pieces of crackers, corn chips, Cheetos, watermelon seeds,  two pencils and a protractor used to calculate the targeting aspects of the W82. He hates dust bunnies.

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Here is the thread where we talked about this earlier in the year...

 

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Truthisnotconspiracy: This account is taken from a paper presented to Le Société Pour la Recherche Historique in Paris in 1933. The author’s identity is unknown. (Translated from the French in 1954)

1.  Who exactly are Le Société Pour la Recherche Historique?

2.  Why are they  Le Société "Pour la Recherche Historique", and not "de recherche historique"?   (There is a Société de recherche historique Archiv-Histo: but, besides being based in Canada, and not in Paris, it doesn't appear to have been established until 1981).

3.   Why are they "Le Société," and not (more correctly) "La Société?"

4.  Why is there anyway no society of this name on Gallica?

So far, it's not looking good ...

In fact, altogether what Kenemet said ...

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