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Time is key to happiness, new study claims

18 posts in this topic

 

Makes sense.

Most people that suffer (on the bell curve) often lack time management skills. Which is why behaviorists tend to focus on clutter and organization to help anxious and depressed people.

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I have plenty of time, I lost my clock.:lol:

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Doesn't matter how much money you have, you can't buy time..

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Oh yeah you can buy good times. I knew life was good when I got so that I could hire someone to mow my yard and change my oil. I always begrudged that on my Saturdays I had to do that sort of crud instead of spending time on other things that I enjoyed but couldn't do during the week because I worked. I may not live any more hours but the hours that I have are going to be better because I don't have to waste them doing things that I don't like.

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I'm sure everyone at some point has said "I'd pay anything to have somebody else do this"

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Having enough money to have free time is paramount to happiness. I would also add that having good physical and mental health is equally important in order to enjoy ones free time.

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Much research encourages the inclusion of scheduling time for self when developing time management plans for goal setting and life management. Yet, a good social support system is typically the most effective tool for minimizing the effects of stress.

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Posted (edited)

Completely, absolutely, one-hundred-percent agree with the results of this research. With one exception - to get money you have to pay for it with your free time. Time is money, if, of course, you're not using some dirty tricks to get more money in less time at the expense of other people's work. That's why years ago I've thrown away my smartphone, dismounted the TV antenna, (almost completely) stopped reading political news on the Internet and finally moved to the country to be in a good small company of good people, like you people on the UM ;) And let everything else happily go to ... where it should be! I guess it's the only way of making more free time at no one's expense.

Edited by Chaldon

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I don't understand how this works. We spend time to earn money, but then we spend the money we earned to buy back the time we lost earning that money? That seems counter-productive. I find myself happier spending on material goods than wasting my money to earn back time I lost trying to earn that money in the first place.

If for example, I work for $10 an hour for 10 hours, making $100 a day, then spending that $100 to pay someone to clean my house for the day because I used that time working my $10/hr job instead of cleaning my own house, then I would end up with both time and money lost, achieving no gain at all. It's like taking one step back for every step forward

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Posted (edited)

36 minutes ago, Ashyne said:

I don't understand how this works. We spend time to earn money, but then we spend the money we earned to buy back the time we lost earning that money? That seems counter-productive. I find myself happier spending on material goods than wasting my money to earn back time I lost trying to earn that money in the first place.

If for example, I work for $10 an hour for 10 hours, making $100 a day, then spending that $100 to pay someone to clean my house for the day because I used that time working my $10/hr job instead of cleaning my own house, then I would end up with both time and money lost, achieving no gain at all. It's like taking one step back for every step forward

This should work, theoretically. But practically you keep yourself busy and anxious about how to get more money while someone's cleaning your house. In the other case, when you're not busy chasing after money, you wonderfully enough find the time to clean your own house and to lounge on the terrace, and although you're pretty poor it doesn't bother you much. ^_^ All that aside, seriously, happiness is a metaphoric thing, and there's always a golden middle, one must become a master of oneself, not a slave of one's one business - that brings you happiness. But it's very hard to achieve in the world of temptations.

Edited by Chaldon
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Well that does it, I'm getting a house cleaner.

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Posted (edited)

I think people perceive lack of time diffrently though. Like I don't get stressed too easily but my freind does.

When I was doing college full time and working a fair amount I was pretty busy but I still felt like I had time to do things I wanted. Not unlimited or a whole bunch of time but still time.

My freind was lucky enough that her fsmily could pay for everything so she just had to do class and not work but yet she was always stressed out and obsess over any assignments making herself believe she had absolutely no time for herself.

And then I have an other freind who is insane he does a couple summer classes currently and works over 40 hours and someone still goes out and takes time to play video games. Like that would be too much for me lol. But just goes to show it depends on the person 

I think a lot of it just depends on the persons perception and time management skills.

(Unless you have kids, then that's a whole diffrent ball park lol)

Edited by spartan max2

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Posted (edited)

If I were to pay someone to do household work, in order to give me more time, I would have to work more, and thereby have less time.  

Now, if, as in this study, someone gives me free money, that's maybe a different matter.  But the real world doesn't work like that.  So IMO the study is flawed.   Besides, I think I would still much rather have a good book and a bottle of wine to enjoy after doing the housework than pay someone to do the work meaning I have twice as much free time and nothing to with it ..... ;) 

 

Edited by Essan
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More time to do what you want, instead of what everyone else wants you to do, that works for me.

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On ‎7‎/‎26‎/‎2017 at 10:45 AM, Ashyne said:

I don't understand how this works. We spend time to earn money, but then we spend the money we earned to buy back the time we lost earning that money? That seems counter-productive. I find myself happier spending on material goods than wasting my money to earn back time I lost trying to earn that money in the first place.

If for example, I work for $10 an hour for 10 hours, making $100 a day, then spending that $100 to pay someone to clean my house for the day because I used that time working my $10/hr job instead of cleaning my own house, then I would end up with both time and money lost, achieving no gain at all. It's like taking one step back for every step forward

If you like your job more than cleaning your house, you bought happiness with the time you didn't have to clean. You're just a poor, but happier about it!

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On ‎25‎/‎07‎/‎2017 at 7:07 PM, UM-Bot said:

According to researchers, stressing out over a lack of time is a leading cause of anxiety and depression.

http://www.unexplained-mysteries.com/news/309944/time-is-key-to-happiness-new-study-claims

An interesting take on mindfulness is that we seek to keep the things we enjoy going as long as possible while seeking to end as soon as possible those things we find uncomfortable, stressful or annoying. It could be framed using time. Perhaps there are new approaches to mindfulness there about simply letting time do its thing.

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On 7/26/2017 at 10:45 AM, Ashyne said:

I don't understand how this works. We spend time to earn money, but then we spend the money we earned to buy back the time we lost earning that money? That seems counter-productive. I find myself happier spending on material goods than wasting my money to earn back time I lost trying to earn that money in the first place.

If for example, I work for $10 an hour for 10 hours, making $100 a day, then spending that $100 to pay someone to clean my house for the day because I used that time working my $10/hr job instead of cleaning my own house, then I would end up with both time and money lost, achieving no gain at all. It's like taking one step back for every step forward

Usually, you'd hire someone who is either faster than you at doing the chores or someone who earn less than you. Let say you are a doctor or architect, you earn more money in an hour that it would cost you to have one hour of cleaning. If you earn the same money what you would pay, it's not so much a bargain anymore.

Spending money on material goods is the same actually. I do some sewing for historical clothing and cosplay, but I don't bother with modern cloths, because there are plenty of Chinese and Bangladeshi doing the same I would for a much lower hourly salary. On the other hand, I buy some IKEA furniture because I'm quick to assemble them and it's not worth to buy them fully assembled by some Bulgarian or Indonesian.

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