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jawhar

August 21, 2017, all of North America will...

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Posted (edited)

On Monday, August 21, 2017, all of North America will be treated to an eclipse of the sun.
 
 
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Anyone within the path of totality can see one of nature’s most awe inspiring sights - a total solar eclipse.
 This path, where the moon will completely cover the sun and the sun's tenuous atmosphere - the corona - can be seen, will stretch from Salem, Oregon to Charleston, South Carolina.
 
 Observers outside this path will still see a partial solar eclipse where the moon covers part of the sun's disk. NASA created this website to provide a guide to this amazing event. 
 
Edited by jawhar
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Looking forward to this.

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all the world out america forwards to this and follwoing on tv

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70% of the sun covered in Southern CA at 10:30am pacific time, the path of totality crosses near Salem and Bend, Oregon. The path of totality moves east through Idaho, Wyoming, western Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Kentucky, eastern Tennessee, western North Carolina and South Carolina. My wife has family in Missouri able to see the totality, the greatest duration will be between St. Louis, Mo and Nashville, TN.

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waw   great moments with this

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My luck we'll probably have rain.

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I was tempted to take a few days off work and drive down to the total eclipse path since it's only a state and a half away(maybe 8-12 hours).  In the end I didn't think it would be worth it considering how crowded nearly every town along the path will be.

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Found the Times

Oregon : 10:15 AM..................3 Hour Time Difference to East Coast (South Carolina).......1:15PM

Eclipse will race across America in 93 minutes

Eclipse South Carolina 2:43 PM ! Eastern Standard Time:D

 

 

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Pretty much bummin I wont get to see it :angry:

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13 minutes ago, Farmer77 said:

Pretty much bummin I wont get to see it :angry:

The Great American Eclipse!

Many people running to Yosemite National Park!:D

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For people living outside the track of the total eclipse I recommend to go there, even its a few 100kms drive or flight. I`ve watched the 1996 eclipse in Munich (800kms from my hometown) and I can say that is was one of the most amazing and bizarre moments in my life.

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 i have never kept up with this
however it seems to be worth it
i am sure that the members here will send us the event directly

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Not only total and some partial solar eclipses are fun to view (do so safely without harming your eyes), so are annular. 3 annular eclipses in the USA: May 30, 1984 in the Southeast US, Jan 5, 1992 for southern CA, May 10, 1994 (85-90% covered in southern CA- the path in Arizona and New Mexico) and May 20, 2012 (similarly 85-90%, northern CA saw the annular eclipse). This jpg is taken in Palm Springs area CA where I live.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solar_eclipse_of_May_20,_2012#/media/File:Solar_eclipse.jpg

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Posted (edited)

News reports have  begun to emerge, stating that many of the eclipse-watching glasses that are being sold, and distributed for free, ahead of tomorrow's solar eclipse, may be dangerously defective. Even those distributed by reputable organizations or sellers, and seeming to be certified safe, may not properly protect the eyes. Some of these glasses have been belatedly recalled. Personally, I won't risk losing my eyesight.

It's far safer, and simple to view the eclipse by projection. Make a pin-hole in a sheet of cardboard, hold it up to the Sun, and project it's image onto a second cardboard, preferably white. Move the latter about to get the clearest image.  If binoculars are available, these can be used instead of a pin-hole to project the image onto the white cardboard.

Edited by bison
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Posted (edited)

TSEs in US history: the closest TSE to southern CA was in Sep. 10, 1923 when the sun was 90% covered in Los Angeles and San Diego, the path of totality was in Baja Cal. Mexico. There were 4 TSEs in Canada: 1945, 1954...and 1963 which slipped into Maine, and in 1972. A sunrise TSE in Oct. 2, 1959 in New England (Boston, Mass). A 1925 TSE path directly crossed NYC...and 1932 TSE in New England. The last trans-national TSE was 1918, almost a century ago.

I recall (but didn't view) the partial solar eclipse of Oct 23, 2014. My French relatives recall the sun was 90-95% covered in Nord Pas-de-Calais, France during the Aug 11, 1999 TSE which crossed Europe. And I just read within my expected life span, the TSEs of 2044 for western Canada and 2045 following a similar path across America (this one in Northern CA) is a can't miss. 

 
Edited by Solipsi Rai
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For what it's worth, below is a quote from the Urantia Book, Paper 122.

 

These wise men saw no star to guide them to Bethlehem. The beautiful legend of the star of Bethlehem originated in this way: Jesus was born August 21 at noon, 7 B.C. On May 29, 7 B.C., there occurred an extraordinary conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn in the constellation of Pisces. And it is a remarkable astronomic fact that similar conjunctions occurred on September 29 and December 5 of the same year. Upon the basis of these extraordinary but wholly natural events the well-meaning zealots of the succeeding generation constructed the appealing legend of the star of Bethlehem and the adoring Magi led thereby to the manger, where they beheld and worshiped the newborn babe. Oriental and near-Oriental minds delight in fairy stories, and they are continually spinning such beautiful myths about the lives of their religious leaders and political heroes. In the absence of printing, when most human knowledge was passed by word of mouth from one generation to another, it was very easy for myths to become traditions and for traditions eventually to become accepted as facts.

 

 

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Hello all friends...
The National Astronomical Research Institute has revealed that the Earth will witness Monday, August 21, a total solar eclipse only with the sky of the United States. The eclipse path will cut the country from the west coast to the east coast. This event will not be seen in the sky of the Arab world.
 
58073ff1c46188a11f8b4644.PNG

The National Astronomical Research Institute said in a statement just recently that the event was described as "the Great American Eclipse" because it is a complete solar eclipse and will be visible within a belt that crosses the entire adjacent US state.The National Astronomical Research Institute noted that the eclipse of June 8, 1918 was the last visible eclipse of the entire United States.The Institute explained that the solar eclipse is an astronomical phenomenon occurs when the moon passes between the earth and the sun and all three objects on the integrity of almost one, and therefore the moon obscures the disk of the sun in whole or in part to the scenes on the ground."The total solar eclipse occurs when the diameter of the moon is greater than the sun," said Dr. Yasser Abdel Hady, a professor of sun at the institute. "The moon then obscures all direct sunlight in a narrow path across the earth's surface, turning the day into a night. Will happen tomorrow for two minutes and 40 seconds is the peak of eclipse.The total solar eclipse of the sun is the first solar eclipse since the solar eclipse of March 7, 1970, and the first solar eclipse seen from the United States since the solar eclipse of July 11, 1991, which was seen only from a part of Hawaii is the first total solar eclipse seen from the United States since 1979.
 

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3 hours ago, jawhar said:
"The total solar eclipse occurs when the apparent angular diameter of the moon is equal to or greater than the sun," said Dr. Yasser Abdel Hady, a professor of sun at the institute.

Fixed that for you, Dr Hady.

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12 hours ago, Will Due said:

For what it's worth, below is a quote from the Urantia Book, Paper 122.

 

These wise men saw no star to guide them to Bethlehem. The beautiful legend of the star of Bethlehem originated in this way: Jesus was born August 21 at noon, 7 B.C. On May 29, 7 B.C., there occurred an extraordinary conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn in the constellation of Pisces. And it is a remarkable astronomic fact that similar conjunctions occurred on September 29 and December 5 of the same year. Upon the basis of these extraordinary but wholly natural events the well-meaning zealots of the succeeding generation constructed the appealing legend of the star of Bethlehem and the adoring Magi led thereby to the manger, where they beheld and worshiped the newborn babe. Oriental and near-Oriental minds delight in fairy stories, and they are continually spinning such beautiful myths about the lives of their religious leaders and political heroes. In the absence of printing, when most human knowledge was passed by word of mouth from one generation to another, it was very easy for myths to become traditions and for traditions eventually to become accepted as facts.

What?

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The best 3 TV channels (and internet streams) to view today's eclipse: the Science Channel, the Weather Channel and NASA TV. Sit back, hang tight and watch the nature show. 

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On 8/13/2017 at 0:05 AM, Hammerclaw said:

My luck we'll probably have rain.

Apparently, it's predicted to be cloudy in my area. (Leave it to New England to blow the fun) But my hubby and I look at this as a bit of good thing, betting it will still get dark, but keeping from any viewing the sun. I don't plan on it, but to experience the darkness. 

 

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Footage of today's eclipse - I had fun viewing this today, luckily I wasn't scheduled to work.

 

 

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I'm surprised more people here didn't watch the eclipse or at least no one is talking about it. I took off of work and drove to Greenville, SC. It was well worth the 6 hour trip for me. For 2 minutes and 30 seconds I was awestruck. Pictures really don't do justice. It was 3 dimensional. I highly recommend doing what you have to do to see the next one. I will, if I'm still able.

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I had to share this...on today's Facebook feed. At least my children weren't stuck on the computer, TV or some video game consule on Monday. No Pokemon Go, just look at Dad's eclipse box, it didn't cost anything to make.

Image may contain: 7 people, crowd and text

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