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Still Waters

Tougher than steel: auto parts from wood pulp

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The global push among carmakers to make ever lighter vehicles is leading some auto suppliers in Japan to turn to what seems like an unlikely substitute for steel - wood.

Japanese researchers and auto component makers say a material made from wood pulp weighs just one fifth of steel and can be five times stronger.

The material - cellulose nanofibers - could become a viable alternative to steel in the decades ahead, they say, although it faces competition from carbon-based materials, and remains a long way from being commercially viable.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-autos-japan-wood-idUSKCN1AU2FX

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, Still Waters said:

The global push among carmakers to make ever lighter vehicles is leading some auto suppliers in Japan to turn to what seems like an unlikely substitute for steel - wood.

Japanese researchers and auto component makers say a material made from wood pulp weighs just one fifth of steel and can be five times stronger.

The material - cellulose nanofibers - could become a viable alternative to steel in the decades ahead, they say, although it faces competition from carbon-based materials, and remains a long way from being commercially viable.

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-autos-japan-wood-idUSKCN1AU2FX

Sounds good, I'm in favor of trying new methods, but this seems too good to be true.

Quote

Japanese researchers and auto component makers say a material made from wood pulp weighs just one fifth of steel and can be five times stronger.

I hope it works out though.

Edited by .ZZ.
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resin treated wood. 

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Not an entirely new concept, I believe Henry Ford did much the same  

 

NYT1941.jpg

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