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Frank_Hoenedge

Standford Prison Experiment - Measure of bias

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Posted (edited)

https://digest.bps.org.uk/2014/07/23/what-the-textbooks-dont-tell-you-one-of-psychologys-most-famous-experiments-was-seriously-flawed/

Conducted in 1971, the Stanford Prison Experiment (SPE) has acquired a mythical status and provided the inspiration for at least two feature-lengthfilms. 

The SPE was criticised back in the 70s, but that criticism has noticeably escalated and widened in recent years. New details to emerge show that Zimbardo played a key role in encouraging his “guards” to behave in tyrannical fashion.

Edited by Frank_Hoenedge
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kinda gutted about the additional d in Stanford now lol. Back when I was being educated I was told the project was cancelled after Zimbardo took a colleague out to dinner and discussed the progress of the prisoners.

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New details to emerge show that Zimbardo played a key role in encouraging his “guards” to behave in tyrannical fashion.

Damn...does that invalidate the whole study?

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The way it is interpreted differs from nation to nation. For me it was pretty clear that the lack of human controls in the study added exaggeration to the displayed behaviours through enabling.

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3 hours ago, Dark_Grey said:

Damn...does that invalidate the whole study?

I would think that just shows that he was affected by the experiment, as well.

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12 hours ago, ChaosRose said:

I would think that just shows that he was affected by the experiment, as well.

Or was desirous of a particular outcome..  It's how you do TV programs, not science.

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Still, professor urges students to behave monstrously...and...they do. All of the "guards" do. 

That's like what the Stanley Milgram experiment found. People listen to those they view as being in authority, and a lot of the time, they do it without question. 

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