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trevorhbj

Sleep Deprivation to treat depression

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Yeah, that just sounds like it would add more problems. 

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I mean it's like getting drunk :rolleyes: lol. Short term relief, long term problems 

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I have always noticed, the more I sleep, the less happy I am on average.

 

 

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Just now, Will Due said:

I have always noticed, the more I sleep, the less happy I am on average.

 

 

Well, people with depression often have that thing where they just can't get themselves out of bed. I guess just forcing yourself out might be a good thing. I can't imagine not getting enough sleep would be good, though. Maybe just finding the right balance. 

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This is like an argument for fasting.

The only benefit I see is potentially greater levels of self-control.

Although there are far healthier alternatives to achieving this, so this kind of thing is unnecessary.

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Links between sleep and depression are strong. About three quarters of depressed patients have insomnia symptoms, and hypersomnia is present in about 40% of young depressed adults and 10% of older patients, with a preponderance in females. The symptoms cause huge distress, have a major impact on quality of life, and are a strong risk factor for suicide. As well as the subjective experience of sleep symptoms, there are well-documented changes in objective sleep architecture in depression. Mechanisms of sleep regulation and how they might be disturbed in depression are discussed. The sleep symptoms are often unresolved by treatment, and confer a greater risk of relapse and recurrence. Epidemiological studies have pointed out that insomnia in nondepressed subjects is a risk factor for later development of depression. There is therefore a need for more successful management of sleep disturbance in depression, in order to improve quality of life in these patients and reduce an important factor in depressive relapse and recurrence.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3181883/

Insomnia is very common among depressed patients. Evidence suggests that people with insomnia have a ten-fold risk ofdeveloping depression compared with those who sleep well. Depressed individuals may suffer from a range of insomnia symptoms, including difficulty falling asleep (sleep onset insomnia), difficulty staying asleep (sleep maintenance insomnia), unrefreshing sleep, and daytime sleepiness. However, research suggests that the risk of developing depression is highest among people with both sleep onset and sleep maintenance insomnia.

https://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-disorders-problems/depression-and-sleep

 

The quality of your sleep is closely related to how you think, how you act, and how you feel. It is obvious that you will be more alert and well rested when you get the sleep that you need. But sleep does much more than this. It also helps you think more clearly, have more energy, and feel better about life.

When you don't sleep well, all of the benefits of sleep begin to come up missing in your life. More than just feeling tired, you can become frustrated, unmotivated, and even have severe mood swings. The link between your mood and your sleep will greatly affect the overall quality of your life.

http://sleepcenter.ucla.edu/depression

Yeah I think I'm going to stick with 7-8 hours a night with naps on the weekend, plus plenty of water, fresh fruit, and time outside. And include some kind of exercise.

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This has to be the worst advice I've seen on these forums.  Isn't this akin to dropping something on your left foot to stop the pain in your right?

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If being exhausted both physically and mentally is good thing to fight depression then sure, i could agree.

 

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19 minutes ago, I'mConvinced said:

This has to be the worst advice I've seen on these forums.  Isn't this akin to dropping something on your left foot to stop the pain in your right?

If you stub your toe, just shoot yourself in the head. You'll forget about the toe.:lol:

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This is fascinating. To oversimplify, sleep deprivation can lead to hallucinations, and elevated neurotransmitters can lead to schizophrenia and hallucinations, while depressives have lower levels of neurotransmitters. Never made that connection before.

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On 9/24/2017 at 10:40 AM, ChaosRose said:

Well, people with depression often have that thing where they just can't get themselves out of bed. I guess just forcing yourself out might be a good thing. I can't imagine not getting enough sleep would be good, though. Maybe just finding the right balance. 

The one thing I found that definitely raised my mood was regularly exercising.  It was as simple as forcing myself to get outdoors and walk, even for a short distance EVERY DAY.

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Posted (edited)

I remember reading about this a few years ago and as i remember it had something to do with "resetting" the circadian rhythm.

 Persons that suffer from depression often have problems sleeping and/or a very poor quality of sleep. Insomnia is common. This only adds to the depression because you often lie awake with depressive thoughts and blaming yourself. Resetting the circadian rhythm, i.e. a good sleep-wake cycle, can have a positive effect on the depression. It has to be done under strictly controlled supervision though and it is not reccomended to do at home.

Edited by Flog

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Hmm I've thought about that... sometimes I feel I should sleep less to struggle less... 

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