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NightScreams

DNA analysis of the elongated skulls

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Elongated-skulls-museum-Romania.jpg?itok

 

"They are approximately 3000 years old, and initial DNA analysis of them has revealed that they may not have come from humans"

http://www.earth-matters.nl/75/11388/geschiedenis/Artikel printen

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Keep in mind, just because a group of people have a genetic mutation not found in other groups of humans doesn't mean they came from space aliens. Genetic mutations happen naturally and it would be quite possible for an isolated group of people to have a mutation unique to their own group.

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The article that was linked to called Hancock an historian. LOL.

It goes on to say that there are no results so far.

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And yet AFAIK no actual qualified geneticist has stepped forward and taken credit for performing the requisite testing and publishing the results in a proper scientific paper. That's rather damning in itself, leaving one to wonder what were the qualifications of the person or persons performing such testing and were proper protocols enforced to maintain the integrity of the testing and results and why were these alleged results not published for the wider scientific community to verify?

cormac

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2 hours ago, NightScreams said:

Elongated-skulls-museum-Romania.jpg?itok

 

"They are approximately 3000 years old, and initial DNA analysis of them has revealed that they may not have come from humans"

http://www.earth-matters.nl/75/11388/geschiedenis/Artikel printen

A search in the forum will show you several threads about these skulls and the practice of headbinding that you may find enlightening as there are many links from reputable sources and posters that show several different cultures globally that practiced this in the past and that Neandertals employed this practice as well.

Some types of headbinding were  employed to signify status or region of origin.

jmccr8 

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1 hour ago, cormac mac airt said:

And yet AFAIK no actual qualified geneticist has stepped forward and taken credit for performing the requisite testing and publishing the results in a proper scientific paper. That's rather damning in itself, leaving one to wonder what were the qualifications of the person or persons performing such testing and were proper protocols enforced to maintain the integrity of the testing and results and why were these alleged results not published for the wider scientific community to verify?

cormac

Why, they swabbed the skulls' cheeks and sent in the samples to 23andme. But, wait, the skulls don't have cheeks, so the DNA results failed. Therefore, the skulls must come from aliens. Or something like that.

How many times have we seen this? Some fringies get together and want to stir up a fuss, so they "claim" a "scientist" has done this or that test. Invariably, they have no real scientist to point to and absolutely no scientific findings to show. This is a lot like the ridiculous "alien mummy" in the Gaia video that was recently making the rounds.

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5 minutes ago, kmt_sesh said:

Why, they swabbed the skulls' cheeks and sent in the samples to 23andme. But, wait, the skulls don't have cheeks, so the DNA results failed. Therefore, the skulls must come from aliens. Or something like that.

How many times have we seen this? Some fringies get together and want to stir up a fuss, so they "claim" a "scientist" has done this or that test. Invariably, they have no real scientist to point to and absolutely no scientific findings to show. This is a lot like the ridiculous "alien mummy" in the Gaia video that was recently making the rounds.

Just as likely that the alleged geneticists swabbed each others cheeks and passed the results off as coming from the Paracas Skull/s.

cormac

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3 hours ago, stereologist said:

The article that was linked to called Hancock an historian. LOL.

It goes on to say that there are no results so far.

I tend to agree. Hancock is most certainly not an historian. He's an author. There's a critical difference. Hancock is a decent writer, but he has not contributed to our overall, academically based body of historical knowledge, and is not taken seriously in the fields of academia. In other words, he's fringe.

But he's hardly the worst. Sometimes a more rational Hancock makes an appearance, and he is at least not as ready and willing as a lot of fringe authors to dive head-first into lunacy. The linked article quotes him:

I have grave doubts about stories presently doing the rounds on the internet, and apparently bought hook, line and sinker by many, making extravagant and premature claims about the implications of DNA testing on certain elongated skulls from Paracas in Peru. We have no details of the lab that’s done the testing, and even in the sensationalist reports that have been attracting so much attention, it is emphasised that the findings are preliminary. Let’s wait until we see the findings themselves, rather than someone referring to them, and let’s get more detailed results..."

He goes on to counsel that we maintain an open mind to the possibility, which is fine, but rational and educated people are not going to see these skulls as aliens, anyway.

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2 minutes ago, cormac mac airt said:

Just as likely that the alleged geneticists swabbed each others cheeks and passed the results off as coming from the Paracas Skull/s.

cormac

Does that mean these "geneticists" are the aliens? :alien:

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10 minutes ago, kmt_sesh said:

Does that mean these "geneticists" are the aliens? :alien:

Well, since Foerster is every bit as "credible" as his buddy the late Lloyd Pye who claimed there were only 33 known human haplogroups, to which interestingly enough I DON'T belong, the implication is that "I" must be an alien. So you tell me. :w00t:

cormac

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Posted (edited)

34 minutes ago, kmt_sesh said:

Why, they swabbed the skulls' cheeks and sent in the samples to 23andme. But, wait, the skulls don't have cheeks, so the DNA results failed. Therefore, the skulls must come from aliens. Or something like that.

How many times have we seen this? Some fringies get together and want to stir up a fuss, so they "claim" a "scientist" has done this or that test. Invariably, they have no real scientist to point to and absolutely no scientific findings to show. This is a lot like the ridiculous "alien mummy" in the Gaia video that was recently making the rounds.

I don't know but I am suspecting that people that watch Bill Nye the science guy think that qualifies them to claim that they are scientists.:whistle:

jmccr8

Edited by jmccr8
spelling
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From the link:

What he is saying is that you can change the shape of the skull, but not the actual volume of it; the shape, but not the size. This is why these skulls are such a mystery,

because of their cranial volume, which in some cases is 2.5 times larger than a conventional human skull. Again, it’s well known that cranial deformation changes the shape of the skull, it’s been done by ancient cultures before by binding the head between two pieces of wood, or binding in cloth, but this does not change the volume and cause elongation like we see with the Paracas skulls.

(my emphasis)

The bolded part is plain and simply a lie.

Even Foerster makes no such claim.

Foerster has reported only one, single number as a cranial volume, and is astonished that it is "25% larger" than a human skull.

Note:

The Paracas Culture (c. 700 BC - 100 AD): One intriguing aspect of this culture which has been overlooked by most researchers is the fact that the nobility practiced skull binding, resulting in cranial deformation. The Paracas situation is somewhat unique in that researchers Juan Navarro and Brien Foerster have found the presence of at least 5 distinct shapes of elongated skulls, each being predominant in specific cemeteries. The largest and most striking are from a site called Chongos, near the town of Pisco, north of Paracas. These skulls are called "cone heads" by many who see them, because of their literal conical appearance. Testing of these have illustrated that, on average, the cranial capacity is 1.5 Ltr's, approximately 25% larger than contemporary skulls, and weigh as much as 60 percent more. Also, eye orbit cavities are significantly larger than contemporary skulls, and the jaws are both larger and thicker.

Source

1.5 liters is 1500 cc.

However, the range of modern human cranial capacities is extensive:

"Living humans have a cranial capacity

ranging from about 950 cc to 1800 cc, with the average about 1400 cc."

Source: Milner, Richard. "Cranial Capacity." The Encyclopedia of Evolution: Humanity's Search For Its Origins. New York: Holt, 1990: 98. Quoted here.

So, this Paracas community had slightly larger than average sized cranial capacity. Certainly not uncommon.

Harte

 

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2 hours ago, jmccr8 said:

I don't know but I am suspecting that people that watch Bill Nye the science guy think that qualifies them to claim that they are scientists.:whistle:

jmccr8

WHAT, what are you saying it doesn't??

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7 hours ago, stereologist said:

The article that was linked to called Hancock an historian. LOL.

It goes on to say that there are no results so far.

 

Yes, a bad mistake ... they should have  called him a  'psychic historian '    :rolleyes:

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3 hours ago, kmt_sesh said:

Does that mean these "geneticists" are the aliens? :alien:

Nope ... could mean they work in a swab factory.   Recent findings in UK ,  was it a serial criminal ?  Their DNA was at a heap of crime sites .   But then , too many to make sense. It turned out it was the DNA from a worker that made the swabs     ;) 

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48 minutes ago, back to earth said:

 

Yes, a bad mistake ... they should have  called him a  'psychic historian '    :rolleyes:

...psychic story/myth teller

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4 minutes ago, Hanslune said:

...psychic story/myth teller

How about "psychic archaeologist"?

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Why is it that the collective of individuals in question consider scientists to be a lying cabal of lying liars who lie .... until they say something they agree with? Why isn't it a lie about the alienness in order to distract from some other truth??

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9 hours ago, NightScreams said:

Elongated-skulls-museum-Romania.jpg?itok

 

"They are approximately 3000 years old, and initial DNA analysis of them has revealed that they may not have come from humans"

http://www.earth-matters.nl/75/11388/geschiedenis/Artikel printen

Now days they put helmets on babies to prevent the flatness of the heads. I imagine the ancients binding their babies heads for the looks.

 https://search.aol.com/aol/image?q=ancient+heads+binded&s_chn=prt_bon&v_t=comsearch

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Posted (edited)

Yes,....   so they could look like aliens .   :) 

Edited by back to earth
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1 hour ago, kmt_sesh said:

How about "psychic archaeologist"?

Quote
Journal Article

Psychic Archaeology: Theory, Method, and Mythology

Marshall McKusick
Journal of Field Archaeology
Vol. 9, No. 1 (Spring, 1982), pp. 99-118

Abstract

In contemporary society the growth of mystical, occult religious cults is providing the public with new interpretations about prehistory, human evolution, and ancient civilizations. One spiritualistic search for the human past is named psychic archaeology and it preaches the gospel that traditional field archaeology is limited, obsolete, and largely useless because it has not been getting the right answers about antiquity. The doctrine continues that the truth about man's cultural origins is obtained from psychic mediums who have the ocult power actually to visit prehistoric times in visions and to exchange messages with the spirit world. These psychic mediums are widely believed to have the ability to dowse for artifacts and in various ways communicate with the ghosts of the dead. One looks in vain to the professional journals for discussions of the fallacies of psychic archaeology, and, partly because of the lack of a professional response to the occult challenge, these new religious movements have grown unchecked despite errors, anachronisms, and false premises in their astonishing claims about the origin and development of human society. This review article is concerned especially with recent publications of Jeffrey Goodman, Hans Holzer, and David Zink, along with a few other earlier authors; their books are cited in the text and in the footnotes.

Jstor

Harte                   

 
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:o

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Wasn't there someone here blithering about 'psychic archeology'?

--Jaylemurph

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The more things change, the more they stay the same. The spirit of  Yelena Petrovna Blavatskaya lives on.

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Skulls exhibiting the deformation from head binding illicits only yawns from experienced archaeologists. The are plenty of living examples of it--even today.                 https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=mayan+head+binding&qpvt=mayan+head+binding                                                                      

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