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Still Waters

Bloodhound supersonic car fires up jet engine

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The Bloodhound supersonic car has been fired up for the first time - and worked a treat.

Engineers turned over the vehicle's Eurofighter jet engine in a "tie-down" test at Cornwall's Newquay airfield on Friday.

It worked flawlessly, sending a big orange flame out of the rear nozzle.

The intention is for the car to begin some "slow-speed" running - about 200mph (320km/h) - at the end of next month.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-41446557

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Posted (edited)

Let's hope it smashes the land speed record and becomes the first land vehicle to hit and exceed 1000mph. It will be a great British feat.

Edited by Black Monk

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After a while isn't the point of the fastest lose importance ? As a ground speed I mean . What practical lessons are learned for this ?

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''The actual record attempt is due to take place in October on a 1.7-mile strip of runway in Newquay''

How in the world they can achieve something on 1.7miles... probably a typo !

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''The actual record attempt is due to take place in October on a 1.7-mile strip of runway in Newquay''

How in the world they can achieve something on 1.7miles... probably a typo, ehum no an error, it was just to test the jet engine...

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Posted (edited)

4 hours ago, ROGER said:

After a while isn't the point of the fastest lose importance ? As a ground speed I mean . What practical lessons are learned for this ?

Indeed, the Hyperloop is pointless. Actually a lot can be garnered from this with regards to things such as friction, frameworks and structures, suitable materials, rigidity, hardness of materials, expansion and contraction of air, aerodynamics (including the Navier–Stokes equations), centres of gravity, motions, implementation of computer-aided applications, rocket designs etc etc need I go on?

Edited by Lobotomy
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Posted (edited)

I had the same question about setting the record on a 1.7 mile strip but after reading other articles (https://www.motor1.com/news/58673/133151-bhp-bloodhound-ssc-revealed-in-final-guise-will-attempt-to-hit-1000-mph/) on the subject it turns out the 1.7 mile strip will only be used to do an initial 200mph test run before going to Africa to do a record breaking 763+ (but sub 1000) mph run before tweaking the system for a 1000mph attempt in the future.

According to the article the acceleration portion of the 1000mph run will be 55 seconds long with a deceleration phase making the entire run just over two minutes.  According to my calculations that's less than a G of acceleration forces (8.13m/s2) which surprised me, I first thought it would be more than that.  That means the acceleration phase would take just over 7.6 miles and probably a bit longer distance to decelerate.

I wish them luck, not sure I'd want to be driving it.

Edited by Noxasa

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This experiment will determine the limits of current technology. Preliminary tests are proving positive and, having met Andy Green and Ron Ayers, I'm sure they will not attempt this until they're reasonably certain of success.
The limiting factor is no longer the thrust or the g-forces created in the wheels: the biggest problem is finding a flat straight they can safely accelerate and decelerate on. There is no artificial surface long enough. if they boosted the thrust to achieve top speed in the distances available the pilot would suffer unbearable g-forces and probably die. I'm sure Andy doesn't plan that.

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Posted (edited)

While I hope nothing bad happens, this is another example of a "barrier" that someone deems has to be broken.  What are the practical applications of this feat?  Am I missing something?  Or is it the thrill of victory or the agony of defeat?

Edited by paperdyer

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11 hours ago, Lobotomy said:

Actually a lot can be garnered from this with regards to things such as friction, frameworks and structures, suitable materials, rigidity, hardness of materials, expansion and contraction of air, aerodynamics (including the Navier–Stokes equations), centres of gravity, motions, implementation of computer-aided applications, rocket designs etc etc need I go on?

All known already.

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This is just a piece of hype, probably to encourage investment in the project. Statically testing a jet engine, whether it is in the original aircraft, on a testbed or rigged into a prototype land vehicle, is no great acievement. The true challenge comes when it undergoes dynamic testing when powering a wheeled vehicle at speed. Even then the real problems lie with the vehicle dynamics rather than with the engines operational performance. But good luck to them.

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To all those that question "why"- if you have to ask then you won't get it. And you will probably live a completely mundane life. Why should we go to the moon? Why should we send rockets to Mars? Why not? Human nature usually inspires such undertakings, but only the great thinkers and adventurers  will succeed at moving humanity forward.

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On 02/10/2017 at 4:56 PM, toast said:

All known already.

And how, might I add is the Navier–Stokes equations 'known' already when according to the Clay Mathematics Institute, it's one of the seven most important open problems in mathematics and have offered a US$1,000,000 prize for a solution or a counterexample?

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On 02/10/2017 at 1:12 AM, ROGER said:

After a while isn't the point of the fastest lose importance ? As a ground speed I mean . What practical lessons are learned for this ?

What practical lessons are learned from the longest time spent in a bathtub of baked beans or the most stinging nettles eaten in five minutes?

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"1,000mph car successfully fires up jet engine"
Impressive, I too succeeded in turning on my toaster this morning

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This is exactly what I need to get to work on time.

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That's definitely not a car, it's a rocket on 4 wheels. Regardless very cool. Whoever actually has the balls to drive that thing 1kmph has my respect.

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