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Still Waters

'Alarming' amounts of pesticides in honey

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Three-quarters of the world's honey contains nerve agent pesticides that pose a potential health hazard to humans, a study suggests.

Scientists tested 198 honey samples from six continents - and 75% of them contained at least one type of neonicotinoid chemical, which is also harmful to bees.

Two-fifths of the samples contained two or more varieties of the pesticides, and 10% held residues from four or five.

Concentrations of pesticides were highest in European, North American and Asian samples.

http://news.sky.com/story/alarming-amounts-of-nerve-agent-pesticides-in-worlds-honey-tests-show-11068159

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We must bump this thread up. Drosophila suzukii can develop pesticide resistance and threatens cherries and grapes. There is also a huge apathy or disregard, and an example can be seen at a UK site "Dipterist's Forum." None have replied to our posts at that site, and we have mentioned non-pesticide approaches to control this pest. They love their flies so much that resistance to pesticides means that 'their flies' are fighting back against the evil humans. These people are mad. A British Columbia study once determined just how many bark beetles had to die to prevent an epidemic. These days, clouds of them can be detected on radar.

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The reader should note the connections to the Illinois bee-keeper whose bees were confiscated because they were developing resistance to glyphosate. The bee-keeper has also been bitten by a Massasauga rattlesnake in Canada, so the bee-keeper's immune system is also suspect. Having tracked the case a bit, there could be c a connection to the African House Snake for LAMP 1 protein in the rattlesnake, at which point we are free and clear to investigate a potential ebola virus vector trajectory and leave the fruit-bat crib mobiles dangled by the media, behind.

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Posted (edited)

Is anyone surprised? If you don't know where it's from, or the various methods of how it was produced, don't buy it.

Edited by WoIverine
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It's not that easy when Monsanto (contracts [italics]) with the farmer-victims, setting up an exquisitely planned coercion game.

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Honeybees and flies in a fait acompli, we note the entomologist as drug pimp as D. suzukii moves into the New Mexican 'hood:

 

5 Mar 2014  NMSU Entomologist Warns of New Invasive Fruit Fly Arrival to New Mexico

https://newscenter.nmsu.edu/Articles/view/10129/nmsu-entomologist-warns-of-new-invasive-fruit-fly-arrival-to-new-mexico

 

They've had three years to mutate. Any follow-up reports? The anti-D. suzukii system we are developing does not concern itself with pesticide or pheromone use.

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THis is an iue. THere isn't much we can do about it as long as bees do what bees do.  You'd have to have farms just for the bees where no pesticides are used on the plants pollinated by the honey bees.themthne lately.

I'm worried about the killer bees that are coimg North.  We haven't heard much about them lately.

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You did not read the New Mexican report, because until D. suzukii showed up, they did not use pesticides on the berries, the same scenario you describe for honeybee farms.

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But I like bee vomit...

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On 06/10/2017 at 11:48 AM, Still Waters said:

Concentrations of pesticides were highest in European, North American and Asian samples.

Not a suprise, those areas are going to require more pesticide to sustain the farming industries that support large populations.

If we had a dramatic drop in population numbers we may be able to do with fewer pesticides but that would require a global responsible for not having more than one child (for a few decades at least, to show any real benefit), the trouble with that is if a culture decides not to uphold it's responsibilities and siezes the opportunity to increase it's percentage of the population this may be viewed as unfair by other cultures that wish to uphold their responsibilities to reduce the human population to sustainable numbers. It would also create a major headache for pension funds (fewer young people paying into a fund and more old people taking a pension). Not that it matters much, as long as some ecconomies feel that they should be able to burn as much oil and coal as they like to gain an ecconomic edge, the environment will become more and more toxic until a point is reached where human population is no longer sustainable 

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The New Mexican entomologist, by promoting pesticide use in New Mexico, is going the wrong way. So too the EPA in today's coal-mining report, which as we have shown on other threads, links to Microcystis. We now link Microcystis precisely to the New Mexican entomologist's error in addressing the D. suzukii problem. Like the system we are developing, the German approach does not use pesticides, pheromones, nor vinegar-yeast traps, though that system is less labor-intensive than ours:

 

Microcystis / Beta-Cyclocitral

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26961531

 

Max Planck Gesellschaft / Drosophila suzukii

https://www.mpg.de/9048982/leaf-odor-attracts-drosophila-suzukii

'....beta-cyclocitral....They must be able to smell new odors and ignore smells that had been attractive in the past.'

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2012 The Cloudforest Gardener / Drosophila suzukii

www.cloudforest.com/cafe/gardening/devastated-drosophila-suzukii.t3443.html

'....Thanks to this pest, I will say my good byes to the majority of the soft fruit crops I have grown so far.'

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