Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 2
UM-Bot

Did Easter Islanders sail to South America ?

26 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Huh? I thought there was DNA evidence in the Easter Islanders and in the native populations on South Americas West Coast.

Read... read.... read....

EDIT: Well they said 5 test subjects, so I would agree with the theory that this might not be a true representative sample of the ancient population.

And apparently there is still the sweet potato to explain. How it got into Polynesia from S. America before anyone had even settled on Easter Island.

Edited by DieChecker
3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Traveling from South America to Easter Island must have been a risky trip with the boats they had at the time.   I wonder what the odds of them finding the island again were?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Myles said:

Traveling from South America to Easter Island must have been a risky trip with the boats they had at the time.   I wonder what the odds of them finding the island again were?

They had no trouble finding Hawaii so...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Bavarian Raven said:

They had no trouble finding Hawaii so...

True.   But how many tries did it take.    Also Hawaii is over 4000 square miles vs 60 for Easter Island. 

Just saying that without sails (that I know of) and currents and weather, It's not an easy voyage.  

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Could it be that in ancient times there were many more islands than there are now in the South Pacific to hop scotch their way across the ocean by?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, Will Due said:

Could it be that in ancient times there were many more islands than there are now in the South Pacific to hop scotch their way across the ocean by?

 No - islands don't just "disappear" - if they existed in recent times but are now entirely below sea level then they would still be discernable as seamounts.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, DieChecker said:

And apparently there is still the sweet potato to explain. How it got into Polynesia from S. America before anyone had even settled on Easter Island.

1

I would imagine birds and/or ocean currents would be a reasonable explanation.

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, Essan said:

 No - islands don't just "disappear" - if they existed in recent times but are now entirely below sea level then they would still be discernable as seamounts.  

Are you sure?

It's well understood and accepted that the continental plates move laterally from side to side. It's also understood (but far less accepted) that they also move vertically up and down.

The land and the bottom of the oceans rise and fall just like they move sideways. In fact, the land and the bottom of the oceans balance each other as they both float on top of the liquid magma below, with the varying water weight of the oceans being the factor that determines land height vs sea level. This is why, when the melting ice that flows from the land and enters the sea, it lightens the land and causes it to rise en masse, while the added water weight that enters the sea likewise causes the sea bottoms to sink.

This is all in general all over the surface of the planet but locally, other factors that cause vertical land and sea bottom shifts also cause oceans to inundate the land. Like they have in the past with the central valley of California and the great plains region of North America. There is plenty of evidence that the gulf of Mexico at one time, extended all the way to the Arctic Ocean, cutting the North American continent in half.

This is how in the South Pacific, at one time, the sea bottom there may have been much more elevated than it is now, and there might have even been a continent there or at least the tips of the highlands poking up above the level of the sea as many more islands than there are now.

 

 

Edited by Will Due

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Will Due said:

Are you sure?

It's well understood and accepted that the continental plates move laterally from side to side. It's also understood (but far less accepted) that they also move vertically up and down.

 

I am quite sure ;)   

Mu never existed.  And it certainly didn't sink thousands of feet beneath the sea, without any trace whatsoever, just a couple of thousand years ago!

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

17 minutes ago, Essan said:

I am quite sure ;)   

Mu never existed.  And it certainly didn't sink thousands of feet beneath the sea, without any trace whatsoever, just a couple of thousand years ago!

Are you sure?

Great changes have occurred with the geology of the world over even a "couple of thousand years" let alone a few hundred thousand.

And that makes it very likely that the shorelines of the continents have varied and changed a lot. Certainly this is true during the several hundred thousand years of the major migrations of man. Like when the American Indians left Eastern Asia to the Chinese going over the then Bering isthmus to America. 

 

 

Edited by Will Due

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Here's something interesting from the UB (go ahead and do the facepalm thing) about this topic and what the evidence now indicates:

 

"One hundred and thirty-two of this race, embarking in a fleet of small boats from Japan, eventually reached South America and by intermarriage with the natives of the Andes established the ancestry of the later rulers of the Incas. They crossed the Pacific by easy stages, tarrying on the many islands they found along the way. The islands of the Polynesian group were both more numerous and larger then than now, and these Andite sailors, together with some who followed them, biologically modified the native groups in transit. Many flourishing centers of civilization grew up on these now submerged lands as a result of Andite penetration. Easter Island was long a religious and administrative center of one of these lost groups. But of the Andites who navigated the Pacific of long ago none but the one hundred and thirty-two ever reached the mainland of the Americas."

 

"Andites" as explained by the authors of the Urantia Book, are those individuals of long ago who were the ancestors of the so-called white race before this race existed. Basically, Andites were the descendants of the ancient people of Mesopotamia going back tens of thousands of years and are now extinct.

 

 

Edited by Will Due

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have to wonder sometimes that the land masses were much closer or still Pangea when our ancestors started moving around.  Or at least there were enough small land masses available to  stopping.  In the type of canoes and boats supposedly used to make the long treks, the odds would have been quite low of reaching South America or Hawaii or any other location of great distance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, paperdyer said:

You have to wonder sometimes that the land masses were much closer or still Pangea when our ancestors started moving around.  Or at least there were enough small land masses available to  stopping.  In the type of canoes and boats supposedly used to make the long treks, the odds would have been quite low of reaching South America or Hawaii or any other location of great distance.

Are you saying Pangea only broke up after the fall of the Roman Empire?! :o

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Essan said:

Are you saying Pangea only broke up after the fall of the Roman Empire?! :o

No, but some of the maps of that time showed land masses we can't find today.  If there was an "Atlantis" maybe a huge plate adjustment took it out.  Of course this is complete speculation on my part.  Just putting some "theories" out there. Much like the UFO people.  Also my meds are wearing off.  Time for more.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seriously, the spread of people across the Pacific is no great mystery if you understand how skilled the people were at navigation.   And there are no proper maps of land masses in the Pacific - or Atlantic - (other than the islands we see today) - nor any geological evidence for any having existed for tens of millions of years.  

3 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
38 minutes ago, Essan said:

Seriously, the spread of people across the Pacific is no great mystery if you understand how skilled the people were at navigation.   And there are no proper maps of land masses in the Pacific - or Atlantic - (other than the islands we see today) - nor any geological evidence for any having existed for tens of millions of years.  

I add that maps in the past weren't as precise as today's. 

A huge chunk of the world was literally uncharted, and the one that was charted, wasn't so well represented. 

So we have to be very careful when reading ancient maps. 

 

Since you cited the Romans, in their maps (especially about Africa) where they didn't know what was there, they usually wrote "hic sunt leones" that translates "here there are lions".

It meant that they had no idea what was there exactly, so probably there was something dangerous.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, paperdyer said:

You have to wonder sometimes that the land masses were much closer or still Pangea when our ancestors started moving around.  Or at least there were enough small land masses available to  stopping.  In the type of canoes and boats supposedly used to make the long treks, the odds would have been quite low of reaching South America or Hawaii or any other location of great distance.

Although the trip itself was dangerous, hitting South America would be very likely if the didn't succumb to the ocean.    

Getting back to Easter Island would have been tough.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Polynesians might landed in the Pacific coasts of North and South America - the Haida people of British Columbia, Canada who we associate as Native Americans or First Nations people, are thought to have Polynesian visitations. It's possible for Native Hawaiians to travel the changing California currents to taken them to the west coast. And yes, Easter Islanders could gone far to Peru and Chile as well vice versa. Norwegian anthropologist Thor Hederyahl theorized this in the 1940s with his Polynesian-themed boat MonTiki sailed from Peru to Tahiti - about 4,000 miles across the South Pacific. The Japanese and Chinese alike were able to build ships strong and steady enough to cross the North Pacific on the Kushiro and Alaska currents to North America or along the Kuril Islands, then to Kamchatka, the Aleutian Islands and finally, Vancouver Island. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, seanjo said:

I would imagine birds and/or ocean currents would be a reasonable explanation.

Doubtful - salt water would kill sweet potatoes (not to mention they sink unless dried out/dead). And why would a bird carry one for thousands of kms?

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Bavarian Raven said:

Doubtful - salt water would kill sweet potatoes (not to mention they sink unless dried out/dead). And why would a bird carry one for thousands of kms?

Birds eat seeds, birds crap seeds...it's a well-known vegetation spreading method. Stuff washes up on beaches all of the time, it only takes one sweet potato carried on flotsam or jetsom to spread the species.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, seanjo said:

Birds eat seeds, birds crap seeds...it's a well-known vegetation spreading method. Stuff washes up on beaches all of the time, it only takes one sweet potato carried on flotsam or jetsom to spread the species.

I know this. But sweet potato seeds have a very low germination rate: they mainly spread by tubers. Either way, if one happened to cross the ocean on flotsam (without being sterilized by the salt water) and just happened to grow and reproduce, I would like to meet the brave soul who decided to try this mystery food! 

 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Polynesians were master navigators who sailed the great Pacific long before Europeans ventured out upon the open ocean. They used the stars and the subtle signs of ocean swells rebounding off distant shores to home in on their targets. Far from being a matter of luck, it was a skill passed on verbally and by experience from father to son, generation after generation.  If they could detect tiny  Easter Island, so isolated and remote, finding a continent would have been a piece of cake.                                                 http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/ancient/polynesia-genius-navigators.html

Edited by Hammerclaw
2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/14/2017 at 3:16 AM, Bavarian Raven said:

I know this. But sweet potato seeds have a very low germination rate: they mainly spread by tubers. Either way, if one happened to cross the ocean on flotsam (without being sterilized by the salt water) and just happened to grow and reproduce, I would like to meet the brave soul who decided to try this mystery food! 

 

It happened and someone tasted them....so....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 2

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.