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Where the dinosaurs done in by fungus ?

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Image credit: Steveoc 86
Image credit: Steveoc 86
In the still unsolved mystery of how the dinosaurs died, there's a new suspect -- fungus. After a meteor slammed into the Earth 65 million years ago, "the great dying" began, decimating life in the oceans and killing off the dinosaurs -- with mysteriously little effect on mammals.

Conjecture over what did in the reptiles has long fascinated everyone from school children to paleontologists, but a new theory suggests that a less earth-shaking possibility could have played a role.

news icon View: Full Article | Source: Boston Globe

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"After a meteor slammed into the Earth 65 million years ago, "the great dying" began"

This is wrong. The "Great Dying" had been going on long before the the asteroid strike and continued after the strike. As for mammals being unscathed, do we know that? Do we know that few mammal species went extinct during that period? Finally, some of the dinosaurs were probably warm blooded so body temperature alone wasn't enough to save them. Crocodiles are and were cold blooded and they did just fine. There are plenty of lizards and reptiles that survived. Body temperature isn't the answer.

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They formed a cult and committed mass suicide...?

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Maybe it was athlete's foot... *stares at her feet*

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I think that after the meteor, life was much harder for the dinosaurs. Plantation was demolished and the food sources for the herbivores and after they died so did the carnivores. The diminishing populations could only survive by repopulating with each other causing inbreed dinosaurs, which did not survive because of deformalities

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Oh great we will probably have a new disaster movie

''Attack of the deadly fungus''

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Oh great we will probably have a new disaster movie

''Attack of the deadly fungus''

There's a 2008 film called "Splinter" with a type of fungus that eats flesh and is drawn by heat. It was pretty good, actually.

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Can someone program that Bot to spell correctly please

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Interesting idea, I don't believe the meteor was the sole cause they had shown decline before impact. Certainly didn't help them though, so it is a good concept.

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dinosaur3.jpg

Image credit: Steveoc 86

In the still unsolved mystery of how the dinosaurs died, there's a new suspect -- fungus. After a meteor slammed into the Earth 65 million years ago, "the great dying" began, decimating life in the oceans and killing off the dinosaurs -- with mysteriously little effect on mammals.

Conjecture over what did in the reptiles has long fascinated everyone from school children to paleontologists, but a new theory suggests that a less earth-shaking possibility could have played a role.

fpiconarticle.gif View: Full Article | Source: Boston Globe

Im pretty sure the "Great Dying" was a totally separate mass extinction event that occurred long before the dinosaurs were around in the Permian period. Due to changes in sea tempreture and a long, slow alteration in global climate causing the saliniseation of water to such a degree it killed the vast majority of life on the plannet.

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