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Dakoda

Can We Predict When???

44 posts in this topic

The most dangerous asteroids, capable of a global disaster, are extremely rare. The threshold size is believed to be 1/2 to 1 km. The threshold for an impact that causes widespread global mortality and threatens civilization almost certainly lies between about 0.5 and 5 km diameter, perhaps near 2 km. But can we predict a hazard of such in the near future?  And if so, what sort of impacts are we looking at???.

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Hey Dakoda,  :se

                   Interesting topic. Check out the Impact Hazards, Possible Life Extinction section towards the bottom of this link…

http://members.aol.com/gca7sky/planets/meteors.htm  :s1

It provides many useful links with information on these “Potentially Hazardous Asteroids, or ‘PHA’ as the NASA Near Earth Object Program calls them. http://neo.jpl.nasa.gov/index.html

Enjoy

Tommy  :sm

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According to scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, there are currently 315 known "potentially hazardous asteroids," or PHAs. Each appears to be on a course that will one day bring it close to Earth's orbit, but scientists stress that none of them are known to be on a collision course with the planet.

Many other asteroids that might be listed as PHAs are thought to be out there but not yet found,

reflecting the fact that researchers don't know how many asteroids are out there, let alone how many might eventually cross the path of Earth.

Homer[glow=color,strength,width]

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If an asteriod were travelling at the speed of light or somewhere in the vicinity, could we detect something like this before it is too late?

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Mystify,

When you want to discuss a fast asteroid, you don't fool around.;D

According to Special Relativity(E=mc^2), the "relavistic mass" of an object increases as its speed increases and approaches infinity as the object's speed approaches the speed of light. This means that it would take an infinite amount of energy and an infinate amount of time to accelerate an object with mass to the speed of light.

Homer[glow=color,strength,width]

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Stupid Sun ;D

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I s'pose we should be pleased that it has awakened people to the possibility that an asteroid could be hidden by sunlight...

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            Sure was nice of them to 'send us a memo'   (after the fact!).   :s9

           

           

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Funding is already very low with trying to locate asteroids we CAN see, and now we have to concern ourselves with the 'hidden ones' as well. What a nightmare.

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We just have to hope they land at night then-to be safe.  :s01

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:s2 :s2 :s2 :s2 :s2

*falls off chair*

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:s8

OK, which one of you watched Armageddon last night on TV?!!

:s2

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        There are a lot of ignorant people (with money and power),  who think that space exploration, etc.,  is all a huge waste of money - better used for mankind here on earth.   So,  hopefully,  since this is  for the benefit of mankind,  NASA will finally get more support.    ::)

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Today I read in the paper that an Asteroid passed Earth 1.5 times the lenght from Earth to the moon. The Asteroid was 100 meters in Diameter. The Problem is that they saw it this week.. two weaks after it passed by.

This is another proof of how few we know about the wherabouts of those things.

Odin S.  :s9

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Odin,

that sounds very similar to the asteroid featured in the link I posted.  But they say that it was 1.2 times the distance to the moon, and 70m in length.  :s8

Tommy

:sh

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Odin,

The asteroid passed Earth on March 8th and was discovered 4 days later on March 12th

Tommy,

They are the same(as I know you already know). Some articles have it at 70m, some say between 50-100m....some say 1.5 and some say 1.2...what are you gonna do, and who are going to believe  

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Homer

Your last reply brings me nicely on to my reply:

You can predict whatever want - whether you predict correctly is another matter.  As seen by the inaccurate reporting (not even predicting) on the asteroid. :s02

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Now as I`ve mentioned before the scary part about this is that one day, without notice, we (planet earth) Could be wiped out be a asteroid within miutes due to the fact it was travelling to fast for us to see or what ever reason it is they missed the last one....

KInd of sucks   :s07

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Gizzie,

The dates were the same as well as the approximate size and distance.  Who wants to be the one to go up and accurately measure it?  I feel the news is too important to await the "final" decision on the approximate size and distance.

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Homer

Let's just say it's a BIG one ok? :s2

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That's a deal. Big one it is, Gizzie :)

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