Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
JayRob303

FRESHWATER SHARKS

158 posts in this topic

I have read that several saltwater sharks can live in freshwater for a short amount of time.

What do you think of the possibility of the a shark being in the process of 'evolving' into a animal that can survive indefinitely in either salt water and/or fresh water? And what could the enviromental repricusions in the future be?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have read that several saltwater sharks can live in freshwater for a short amount of time.

What do you think of the possibility of the a shark being in the process of 'evolving' into a animal that can survive indefinitely in either salt water and/or fresh water?  And what could the enviromental repricusions in the future be?

710250[/snapback]

So, you thought you were playing it safe swimming in the lake instead of the ocean, when all of a sudden: CHOMP!

The following summer you're going to take no chances at all. You and your prosthetics go to the YMCA...

where you encounter the terrible, the ugly, POOL SHARK!

w00t.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have read that several saltwater sharks can live in freshwater for a short amount of time.

What do you think of the possibility of the a shark being in the process of 'evolving' into a animal that can survive indefinitely in either salt water and/or fresh water?  And what could the enviromental repricusions in the future be?

710250[/snapback]

So, you thought you were playing it safe swimming in the lake instead of the ocean, when all of a sudden: CHOMP!

The following summer you're going to take no chances at all. You and your prosthetics go to the YMCA...

where you encounter the terrible, the ugly, POOL SHARK!

w00t.gif

710266[/snapback]

ack...a chlorine tolerant shark blink.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

KNOCK KNOCK!!!

Who's there?

LAND SHARK!

Man I miss those old Saturday Night Live bits

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

there are only a couple of type's of shark that can live in fresh water the bull shark and i think the great white(not sure about GW)but even they can not speed large amount of time in fresh water, and remember the lakes are feed by the ocean so the waters not really all that fresh!any way its about time for shark week on Discovery Channel and they always address this type when it starts i'll let you know; it's runs from8:00 to 11:00 every night and you will learn more about them then you ever wanted to know! rofl.giflaugh.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great Whites I don't think can tolerate Fresh water the only one I know for definate is the Bull Shark however I do think there may ba another but not sure?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

Great Whites I don't think can tolerate Fresh water the only one I know for definate is the Bull Shark however I do think there may ba another but not sure?

710412[/snapback]

I think your right i am not sure about the GW either but i remenber that there were two types that could but there are so many species i don;t know if doing a search would help,but maybe someone else already know's unsure.gif

Edited by isis-999

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are several types of freshwater sharks. I, for one, own a Chinese banded highfin shark in my aquarium. They just arn't man-eaters.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There are several types of freshwater sharks. I, for one, own a Chinese banded highfin shark in my aquarium. They just arn't man-eaters.

710434[/snapback]

but what about the salt water sharks that can go into freshwater, we know the bull shark can what is the other one do you know?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are over 43 species of freshwater sharks but I thought we were concentrating on the ones that travel from Salt to freshwater?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yes that is what i thought as well, grin2.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have read that several saltwater sharks can live in freshwater for a short amount of time.

What do you think of the possibility of the a shark being in the process of 'evolving' into a animal that can survive indefinitely in either salt water and/or fresh water?  And what could the enviromental repricusions in the future be?

710250[/snapback]

There is a species of freshwater Bull Shark that lives in Lake Titicaca in Mexico.

Nathan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have read that several saltwater sharks can live in freshwater for a short amount of time.

What do you think of the possibility of the a shark being in the process of 'evolving' into a animal that can survive indefinitely in either salt water and/or fresh water?  And what could the enviromental repricusions in the future be?

710250[/snapback]

There is a species of freshwater Bull Shark that lives in Lake Titicaca in Mexico.

Nathan

710605[/snapback]

remind me never to so swimming there lol grin2.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome to UM Misweetangel

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yes yes but does anyone know what shark. besides the bull shark can live in fresh water just long enough to hunt, but then go back into the ocean wink2.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Great Whites I don't think can tolerate Fresh water the only one I know for definate is the Bull Shark however I do think there may ba another but not sure?

710412[/snapback]

i found it just read it in another link the nurse shark can live in fresh water, for a short time! yes.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All I know is that this October I'm sticking to the resorts swimming pools!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a species of  freshwater Bull Shark that lives in Lake Titicaca in Mexico.

Nathan

710605[/snapback]

I thought Lake Titicaca is in Peru and contains no known sharks. Welcome to the UM forums though Nathan . dontgetit.gif

I think the most well known true fresh water shark is the lake Nicaragua Shark in Lake...you guessed it, Lake Nicaragua in ....you probably guessed it again...Nicaragua. It is a close relative of the Bull shark.

Some lesser known and studied sharks are the rare "river" sharks of species Glyphis. But some of these are sometimes found in brackish water too.

1) Ganges Shark

Glyphis gangeticus (Müller & Henle, 1839)

Definitely known from the Hooghly-Ganges river system, West Bengal, India, and likely from the vicinity of Karachi, Pakistan.

2) Speartooth Shark

Glyphis glyphis (Müller & Henle, 1839)

Uncertain. Speartooth-like sharks occur in Borneo, New Guinea, and Queensland, Australia, but it is uncertain at present if any of these are the true Glyphis glyphis. The holotype (original specimen on which the description is based) has no capture locality listed for it.

3) Irrawady River Shark

Glyphis siamensis (Steindachner, 1896)

The only known specimen is from the Irriwaddy River, near Rangoon. Until very recently, this species was regarded as an aberrant specimen and possible synonym of (the same species as) the Bull Shark, but shark systematist Leonard J.V. Compagno now considers it a member of the genus Glyphis, distinct from the other known species.

4) Glyphis species A

[Not yet described]

Known from two specimens from estuarine waters of the lower reaches of the Bizant River in Queensland, Australia, where it occurs along with the Bull Shark. It is also known from the Alligator River system of the Northern Territory, where it occurs with Glyphis species C. Intriguingly, Glyphis specimens from the Adelaide River, Northern Territory, that have provisionally been identified as this species, display very different vertebral counts (148 total vertebrae, versus 217 in specimens from the Bizant River).

5) Glyphis species B

[Not yet described]

Known from a single specimen from Borneo. Recently, several small Glyphis have been collected from the Kinabatangan River of Sabah, in northern Borneo. These may be the same species as Glyphis species B. The species is presently in the process of being described by Sarah Fowler and Leonard J.V. Compagno.

6) Glyphis species C

[Not yet described]

Only nine specimens have ever been collected - an immature female taken about 100km up the Adelaide River in 1989, an adult male taken some 60km up the South Alligator River in 1996, and in 1999, five females and two males from the East, West and South Alligator Rivers, in brackish water, with salinity ranging from 6 to 26 ppt. This species also occurs alongside Glyphis species A.

SOURCE

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought Lake Titicaca is in Peru and contains no known sharks. Welcome to the UM forums though Nathan .  dontgetit.gif

Lake Titicaca is in southern Peru near the border of Chile. An avant-garde jazz musician I like, Marcelo Radulovich, grew up in Chile. He sometimes refers to himeself as Titicacaman. It's an Andean thing.

cool.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There are over 43 species of freshwater sharks but I thought we were concentrating on the ones that travel from Salt to freshwater?

They are not sharks at all or even closely related to sharks, they are teleost fish, sharks are elasmobranchs and unlike teleosts have no bones in the skeletal structure but instead are cartilaginous also no shark in thew world has only one gill opening all have 5 to 7 openings with all but a few species having 5. No shark is scaled either, instead they have dermal denticles which are analogous to teeth. Many shark species may enter fresh water for short periods of time. However only a few species are capable of spending long periods of time in it. The bull shark (Carcharhinus leucas) is known to be found upto 1000km up the Amazon and in lakes Nicaragua (this is the bull shark and misinfomation has labeled it as another) and Titicaca and in the Ganges and Zambize rivers. It is also known in the rivers mouths of other rivers in tropical waters around the world and any where warm currents flow. No shark is completely fresh water the only fresh water elasmobranchs are the South American river rays which live in the Amazon and Orinoco rivers and is a type of stingray.

Edited by Mattshark

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
STOP NECROPOSTING!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
STOP NECROPOSTING!

I had a strong urge to post on this thread.

Any way leave me alone it was my first post.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sharks of the genus Glyphis (which are elasmobranches) may be entirely freshwater but they are exceedingly rare and most haven't been described by scientists. They have been juveniles found in fresh water so they may be actually be qualifiable as freshwater sharks. Though bull sharks can spend many years (I think seven is the record) in freshwater they don't seem able to reproduce in it.

http://www.elasmo-research.org/conservation/river_sharks.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So, you thought you were playing it safe swimming in the lake instead of the ocean, when all of a sudden: CHOMP!

The following summer you're going to take no chances at all. You and your prosthetics go to the YMCA...

where you encounter the terrible, the ugly, POOL SHARK!

:w00t:

That's not funny, Pilgrim. :no: When I was a little kid I always had the biggest fear that there were sharks in the INDOOR swimming pool at the YMCA.

Didja know that they can smell blood from 14 miles away? ;)

Salt water or fresh water, *shudders* sharks... don't mess with 'em.

Edited by IndigoChild

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I know that Bull Sharks have been found in rivers occasionally, but thats it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.