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Knowledgetruthfreedom

Where did the Knights templars fleet go?

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When the Knights Templar were forced out of france and surrounding regions and were getting killed, they had a fleet of about 18 ships docked in modern day france. The mystery is, is that they disappeared and no has a clue where they went to, what is thought is that they got there treasure and fled across to the Americas and hid there treasure in some isolated location or on some islands. But the question is, what do you actually think happened to the fleet? Perhaps there was never a fleet, did the templars that survived migrate to Switzerland and start the banks that, that country is known for? Or did they just dissolve?

-Mateo

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who know's, but some think they buried some of their treasure (inc the 'holy grail') in scotland either within the church or beneith it. though that church won't let you dig there <_<

but 18 fleets of ships, gotta be mentioned somewhere in history, either entering a country or seeing them pass by while someone looked out towards the ocean.

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The history of the Templars and their connection with the island of Cyprus ends in the year 1571 long after the order had vanished as a formal institution. It is in this year that Ottoman Turks overran the island and the Templar archives were destroyed. An archive that perhaps could have filled in a lot of the holes in Templar history and the mystery surrounding the order.

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When the Knights Templar were forced out of france and surrounding regions and were getting killed, they had a fleet of about 18 ships docked in modern day france. The mystery is, is that they disappeared and no has a clue where they went to, what is thought is that they got there treasure and fled across to the Americas and hid there treasure in some isolated location or on some islands. But the question is, what do you actually think happened to the fleet? Perhaps there was never a fleet, did the templars that survived migrate to Switzerland and start the banks that, that country is known for? Or did they just dissolve?

-Mateo

Baigent and Leigh in The Temple and the Lodge, claim that the Templar fleet escaped en masse from the various ports in the Mediterranean and northern Europe and left for a mysterious destination where they could find political asylum and safety. This destination was Scotland.

The Mediterranean fleet had to sail through the dangerous Straits of Gibraltar and then probably stopped at various Portuguese ports that were sympathetic to the Templars such as Almourol castle, near the town of Abrantes. The fortress of Almourol was constructed by Gualdim Pais, Master of the Order of the Templars in 1171.

Baigent and Leigh go on to say that the Templar fleet sailed up the west coast of Ireland to the safe ports in Donegal and Ulster, where Templar properties were located and arms smuggling to Argyll was common.

The Templar fleet then landed in Argyll by sailing to the south of the islands of Islay and Jura into the Sound of Jura where the Templars unloaded men and cargo at the Scottish Templar strongholds of Kilmory, Castle Sweet and Kilmartin.

Until some wrecks are found we may never know...

Templar fleet

Myths and Stories of the Knights Templar

Edited by Milo

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Part of the Templar Fleet becomes integrated into the Lords of the Isles and the Northern (Sinclair)Fleet. There was a settlement on lands in Argyllshire near Sadell Abbey.

Templar Fleet

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"In Portugal, the Templars were cleared by an inquiry and simply modified their name, becoming the Knights of Christ. They survived under this title well into the sixteenth century, their maritime explorations leaving an indelible mark on history. (Vasco da Gama was a Knight of Christ; Prince Henry the Navigator was a grand Master of the Order. Ships of the Knights of Christ sailed under the Templars' familiar red patte cross. And it was under the same cross that Columbus's three caravels crossed the Atlantic to the New World. Columbus himself was married to the daughter of a former Grand Master of the Order, and had access to his father-in-law's charts and diaries.) - Baigent & Leigh, The Temple and the Lodge

Portugal: The Knights of Christ

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It is possible that the head idol was intended to represent the severed head of John the Baptist, based on allegations that he was revered by the Order. The Templars took part in the sack of Constantinople during the Fourth Crusade in 1203-4. Robert de Clari described the opulence and numerous relics at the sacred chapel of the Boucoleon Palace, amongst them supposedly the head of John the Baptist.

quite interesting.... again good info milo :tu:

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The templar knights would very well of left for Scotland for refuge, but I do beleive they also sailed the ocean to hide the treasure. Across the ocean they hit Canadas shores, and believed this would be a set location to store the hidden treasure. This would explain the mystery of The Oak Island Treasure. Personally, I believe the templar knights created the traps and put their treasure deep inside the island. Some information on this can be found here.

Oak Island Treasure

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When the Knights Templar were forced out of france and surrounding regions and were getting killed, they had a fleet of about 18 ships docked in modern day france. The mystery is, is that they disappeared and no has a clue where they went to, what is thought is that they got there treasure and fled across to the Americas and hid there treasure in some isolated location or on some islands. But the question is, what do you actually think happened to the fleet? Perhaps there was never a fleet, did the templars that survived migrate to Switzerland and start the banks that, that country is known for? Or did they just dissolve?

-Mateo

Scotland gave sanctuary to the templars. many Templars fought in various Scottish/English wars and there are numerous graves of templars still to be seen in Scotland. My guess is that when the Templars fled with what treasure they had left they sailed to Scotland.

Dont forget that the templar organisation was subject to a surprise attack by the french monarchy and they didnt have sufficient time to remove the bulk of their treasure. If they did have any treasure remaining then it would not have amounted to much. The masonic lodge was founded in Scotland from what remained of the templars and that latter organisation would most likely have used that treasure as founding capital. The Templars that did flee to Scotland would have also been forced to pay large amounts to various Scottish factions in order to preserve their anonymity.

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This Knights Templar thing is really cool. I shall look more into them.

Edited by Odinson

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Don't put too much credence in Baigent and Leigh, as their tall tales have more holes in them than Swiss Cheese, and they've admitted as much. When you have a book like Holy Blood-Holy Grail that starts out with, "Suppose there was a club, and imagine that it did this and that. Now, based on these FACTS, we move to..." Sorry, those were imaginings and guesses based on nothing but a desire to sell books.

However... that being said....

It is documented that on Thursday the 12th, the entire Templar fleet was in port... and at dawn on the 13th, they were not there any more.

It is documented that Robert the Bruce of Scotland had no cavalry - and in his last battle with Longshanks he was getting his butt handed to him - until suddenly a large cavalry contingent rode in and turned the tide of the battle. There is no record as to who the riders were or where they went, but they were described as having white tabards with red crosses on them.

One of the more obscure Templar flags - their naval flag - was a white skull and crossed thigh bones on a black background. Sound familiar?

I have no idea where they went. I do know that the Knights Templar in England and the Masonic Knights Templar (not related to each other), are NOT hand-me-downs from the original order. They are wannabes that like wearing cool hats and swords.

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Wow, thanks for all the great info!

-Mateo

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It is documented that Robert the Bruce of Scotland had no cavalry - and in his last battle with Longshanks he was getting his butt handed to him - until suddenly a large cavalry contingent rode in and turned the tide of the battle. There is no record as to who the riders were or where they went, but they were described as having white tabards with red crosses on them.

This appears to be one of those oft-repeated fallacies (possibly originating with good old Baigent and Leigh). The Scottish army, first under Wallace then under Bruce, had always included a small contingent of cavalry. At Bannockburn Bruce did not suddenly acquire a large body of cavalry, according to almost every reliable source he had a small contingent of about 500 or so lightly armed cavalry - just as he'd always had. There has yet to be presented any original source to suggest that they wore the insignia of the Templars, and there is absolutely no reason to suppose that they were anything other than the typical Scottish cavalry they appear to have been. Neither, it must be stressed, did the Scottish cavalry "turn the tide of the battle", nor did the English flee before them, as various authors including David Hatcher Childress and, of course, Baigent and Leigh have suggested. The Scottish cavalry's greatest contribution to the battle was to attack and destroy a smallish body of English archers who were raining arrows into the Scottish pike formations. What turned the tide of the battle was the Scottish army advancing against superior numbers early in the morning, catching the English by surprise, and then holding their ground against poorly disciplined English attacks. The Scots advanced, pressing the English against the Bannock burn where they were trapped and were cut to pieces. We do know who the Scottish cavalry at Bannockburn were, and they weren't Templars. It's not impossible, even unlikely, that there were some members of the Order at Bannockburn, but the idea of a mass body of mysterious Templars winning the day is nothing more than a delightful fiction.

One of the more obscure Templar flags - their naval flag - was a white skull and crossed thigh bones on a black background. Sound familiar?

Again, this seems to be a mistake or a lie which has been repeated as gospel in the last few years. Nobody has yet offered any evidence that the Templar fleet ever flew the jolly roger. Hatcher Childress' book "Pirates and the Lost Templar Fleet" makes the assertion that the jolly roger was a Templar flag several times, and appears to be the origin of the myth. It is not until about two-thirds of the way through the book that Childress offers a source for this startling revelation, and the source he offers is "Under the Black Flag: Life Among the Pirates" by Dr David Cordingly. Detailed reading of Dr Cordingly's book will reveal no mention of the Templars flying the jolly roger, nor indeed any mention of Templars at all! I actually started looking at this thread with a mind to asking if anyone could offer any evidence of Templars using the jolly roger on their ships, otherwise, it appears to be a "fact" made up by Childress to lend considerable weight to his otherwise tenuous theories.

Even if we accept for a moment that the Templars did fly the jolly roger, there is no reason to suppose that there is any connection between their use of the flag in the early fourteenth century and the pirates' use of it four hundred years later. Plenty of people other than pirates used the skull and cross bones as a motif, even as a flag, without being connected to either the Templars or pirates. The skull and bones was a very common symbol for death and mortality in the early 18th century, and it is almost certain that the pirates' use of it was a result of this. Bear in mind also that there were a staggering array of different designs to pirate flags, not just the familiar skull and cross bones. Why, then, should there be any connection between the pirates' use of the flag and the Templars'? Of course, since there is no evidence yet offered that the Templars did use the jolly roger anyway it's a bit of an academic question.

I have no idea where they went. I do know that the Knights Templar in England and the Masonic Knights Templar (not related to each other), are NOT hand-me-downs from the original order. They are wannabes that like wearing cool hats and swords.

THANKYOU!! How nice it is to hear someone else saying that...

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quite interesting.... again good info milo :tu:

It is well known that the order of the Templars was monastic in nature and therefore forbidden to have involvement with women as shown in the Templar Rule of Order. The legend of the "Skull of Sidon" claims that one Templar knight had a relationship with a woman who died. He dug up the woman's corpse and consummated their relationship resulting in a most grisly birth nine months later.

"A great lady of Maraclea was loved by a Templar, A Lord of Sidon; but she died in her youth, and on the night of her burial, this wicked lover crept to the grave, dug up her body and violated it. Then a voice from the void bade him return in nine months time for he would find a son. He obeyed the injunction and at the appointed time he opened the grave again and found a head on the leg bones of the skeleton (skull and crossbones). The same voice bade him 'guard it well, for it would be the giver of all good things', and so he carried it away with him. It became his protecting genius, and he was able to defeat his enemies by merely showing them the magic head. In due course, it passed to the possession of the order."

the skull and bones motif is at the centre of the principle masonic symbol, the compass.

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An interesting legend, but certainly not proof (or even evidence) that Templars used the skull and cross bones as their naval battle flag.

Given that, as you say, the Templars were forbidden to have relations with women I find it extremely unlikely that, even were the legend true, the Templars would have adopted the skull and bones as a symbolic badge as a result - far more likely they'd have repudiated the story. It couldn't have done their reputation any good to have adopted a symbol because of one of their members who not only broke the rules of the order, but also indulged in the disgusting crime of **********. And the order celebrated this? Nah...

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Also what about the theory of the Templar migrating into the mountains of switzerland, and the how the peasants fought like they were veteran solders and wiped out the army that was trying to conquer them. Was it perhaps the knights templar? Then again, the Templar have sometimes been attributed with starting one of the first banks, A banking system soon formed in Switzerland right after the Swiss established there country. Perhaps Im not totally correct, does this theory have any merit, is it major possibility or a slim one?

-Mateo

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In the absence of any documented report from those times and considering the intrigue that was necessary for the surviving knights, there is absolutely nothing that can be said beyond what is given to us by imagination or assumption.

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Ahhhhhhhh(Happy Mood not discusted). The History of the Templar Knights. Reminds me of the Movie "National Treasure" with Nicholas Cage. If you've seen the movie they said our founding fathers were Masons including Benjamin Franklin. The Movie is about a map or picture if you will that Cage discovers on the back of the Declaration of Independence. Well I'm not going to kill it for you guys who haven't seen it. But go check it out. The part about the back of the declaration of independence is fiction(well who knows) but the rest seems true based on real facts.

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An interesting legend, but certainly not proof (or even evidence) that Templars used the skull and cross bones as their naval battle flag.

Given that, as you say, the Templars were forbidden to have relations with women I find it extremely unlikely that, even were the legend true, the Templars would have adopted the skull and bones as a symbolic badge as a result - far more likely they'd have repudiated the story. It couldn't have done their reputation any good to have adopted a symbol because of one of their members who not only broke the rules of the order, but also indulged in the disgusting crime of **********. And the order celebrated this? Nah...

maybe thats why the pope signed their death warrants lol

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I like the idea of Oak Island hiding the treasure. There has certainly been a lot of effort put into digging there, with mixed results, but there seems to be some proof that there is something there. The templars were very knowledgable about construction I believe and might have had the ability to construct such a complex protective pit.

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The Copper Scroll, which was unrolled and deciphered at Manchester University under the guidance of John Allegro, was a list of all the burial sites used to hide the various items both sacred and profane described as the treasure of the Temple of Jerusalem. Many of these sites have been re-excavated since the discovery of the Copper Scroll, and several of them have disclosed not Temple treasure but evidence of Templar excavation made in the twelfth century.

from this link

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Also what about the theory of the Templar migrating into the mountains of switzerland, and the how the peasants fought like they were veteran solders and wiped out the army that was trying to conquer them. Was it perhaps the knights templar? Then again, the Templar have sometimes been attributed with starting one of the first banks, A banking system soon formed in Switzerland right after the Swiss established there country. Perhaps Im not totally correct, does this theory have any merit, is it major possibility or a slim one?

I too find this interesting about the emergence of a banking system in that area. But, and this may be totally in left field as I have done no sort of research on this. If the KT did settle in the Swiss area...would be kind of interesting that the Vatican in 1506 created the Swiss guard. If the Swiss Guard is the great-great grandchild of the KT. Still guarding the Holy Roman Church... food for thought.

Wiking

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I too find this interesting about the emergence of a banking system in that area. But, and this may be totally in left field as I have done no sort of research on this. If the KT did settle in the Swiss area...would be kind of interesting that the Vatican in 1506 created the Swiss guard. If the Swiss Guard is the great-great grandchild of the KT. Still guarding the Holy Roman Church... food for thought.

Wiking

interesting.......

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