Join the Unexplained Mysteries community today! It's free and setting up an account only takes a moment.
- Sign In or Create Account -
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
et's daddy

Army to open criminal probe

10 posts in this topic

WASHINGTON -- The Army said Saturday it will launch a criminal investigation into the April 2004 death of Pat Tillman, the former professional football player who was shot to death by fellow soldiers in Afghanistan in what previous Army reviews had concluded was an accidental shooting.

Col. Joseph Curtin, an Army spokesman, said the Defense Department office of inspector general had reviewed the matter at the Army's request and concluded that a criminal probe was warranted.

Members of the Tillman family were notified on Friday, Curtin said.

Curtin said the scope of the new investigation by the Army Criminal Investigation Command, had not yet been determined in detail.

Members of the Tillman family were notified on Friday, Curtin said. In the past, Tillman's father, Patrick Tillman, and other family members have criticized the Army and its investigations.

"We are obligated to answer the family's questions, as we are with all grieving families,'' Curtin said.

Curtin said the scope of the new investigation by the Army Criminal Investigation Command had not yet been determined in detail.

A Pentagon official, who spoke on condition of anonymity because the new investigation has not been formally begun, said it would focus on possible charges of negligent homicide.

Tillman, 27, died on April 22, 2004, when he was struck by gunfire during a firefight along a canyon road near the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. The Army said at the time that the barrage of bullets came from enemy fire.

A report by the Army later found that troops with Tillman knew at the time that friendly fire had killed the football star. Officers destroyed critical evidence and concealed the truth from Tillman's brother, also an Army Ranger, who was nearby, the report found.

More than three weeks after a memorial service in San Jose, Calif., the Army announced on May 29, 2004, that friendly fire rather than an enemy encounter caused Tillman's death. However, even at the time of the memorial, top Army officials were aware that the investigation showed the death had been caused by an act of "gross negligence,'' the report said.

In spite of the Army's findings, the officer who prepared the report, Brig. Gen. Gary M. Jones, concluded there was no official reluctance to report the truth. Army officials have acknowledged that they should have better handled the information they released on Tillman's death.

Tillman joined the Army after the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks even though he had a multimillion-dollar contract to play football for the Arizona Cardinals. He and his brother completed a tour in Iraq before going to Afghanistan.

http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=2354510

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just heard it 30 seconds ago on TV...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A very sad story for someone I view as a true American hero and a man to be held in the highest respect.

The army f'd up big time when it came to informing his family and something should be done about it.

As for homicide? Murder? It sucks, but sh** happens in combat. sh** happened.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Concerning the distruction of his uniform and body armor, what is the standard operating proceadure for disposing of the personal equiptment of a soldier killed in action. I know that was common in WWII, but what do they do now?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im not quite sure what you mean? The uniform and the body armor was no longer servicable. I figure they did to it exactly what they do with other NS items (or maybe they didnt just leave it lying around and DIDNT give it to the next poor troop that needed it issued to them... but that would be a special case ;))

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sorry Stellar I was not clearer. In some theatres of WWII they burned the uniforms of dead soldiers, while in other areas the uniforms were patched, cleaned and reissued. If burning the uniforms are now the S.O.P. it would eliminate any conspiracy therorys that the Army was trying to destroy evidence. As you know, anything out of the normal would be jumped on as a plot by some people here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm sorry Stellar I was not clearer. In some theatres of WWII they burned the uniforms of dead soldiers, while in other areas the uniforms were patched, cleaned and reissued. If burning the uniforms are now the S.O.P. it would eliminate any conspiracy therorys that the Army was trying to destroy evidence. As you know, anything out of the normal would be jumped on as a plot by some people here.

they would not just sew a uniform and reissue it

the body armor is the property of the unit not the soldier so it would have been returned to the unit, if completely unservicable it would have been destroyed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This wouldnt even be an issue except he was a football player..mistakes happen in wars it's a shame but let the dead rest. :innocent:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This wouldnt even be an issue except he was a football player..mistakes happen in wars it's a shame but let the dead rest. :innocent:

im not so sure

the gov is going to be very careful to not look stupid

must be big if they reopened it

and yeahhhhhhhhh i have the 1st thread in the new section :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The official DoD OIG report on this matter is online. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.