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novaceleste

Question for people in colder climates

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Posted (edited)

I was wondering if someone can help. I'm from deep south Texas and my husband and I keep arguing about whether it lightenings during snowstorms. I have searched the web and found nothing. Could anyone help???

Edited by novaceleste

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I was wondering if someone can help. I'm from deep south Texas and my husband and I keep arguing about whether it lightenings during thunderstorms. I have searched the web and found nothing. Could anyone help???

Lightning comes before thunder light travels faster then sound .

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I was wondering if someone can help. I'm from deep south Texas and my husband and I keep arguing about whether it lightenings during thunderstorms. I have searched the web and found nothing. Could anyone help???

REDO!! REDO!! :lol: I meant to say snowstorm! I'm such a moron! :lol:

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REDO!! REDO!! :lol: I meant to say snowstorm! I'm such a moron! :lol:

That doesn't make u stupid, I mess up all the time :D I cant really ever remember seeing lightning in snow but i'm young (24 :) ) I`ll ask some more of my "seasoned" friends if they can ever recall seeing it.

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You can have a thunder storm with snow. Whilst London isn't really that cold in the winter I have seen this happen a few times, the last time being about a year ago.

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i thought for lightning to strike the air has to be pretty warm but i may be wrong let me check my encyclopedia of science

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I have never seen a lightning during a snowstorm, but I think that the changes that you see a lightning under a snowstorm are the same as when it`s raining, after all both snow and fluent water is water.

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Snowstorms do produce thunder and lightning — only less frequently than summertime thunderstorms. Also, snowflakes — with a larger surface than raindrops — scatter sound and light more efficiently. In addition, visibility during snowstorms is often very low, making the flashes harder to see.

The flashes, or lightning, that you see in the sky are giant atmospheric sparks caused by a sudden release of energy between separated electrical charges in the clouds. Local variations of wind speed and direction — or shear — transport charges to different areas within a cloud, until the potential grows strong enough for a discharge.

In winter, strong localized shears are uncommon and charge separation is weak. Lightning will still occur at the frontal zones, however, where cold air meets warmer air.

In the Great Lakes region, cold air from Canada meets the warmer air over the lakes and causes precipitation. "You'll get thunder snowstorms right along the south shores of Lakes Ontario and Erie," says Rick Watling, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service.

And although lightning is less common in winter, it is even more deadly than at any other time of the year, Watling says. That's because wintertime strikes tend to carry more current then their summertime counterparts.

FYI: Snow, Thunder, and Lightning

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It is more to do with electrical build up with in the clouds. The best conditions for this when it is hot but it isn't exclusively. It is not something that I have seen often (mabe only 2 or 3 times in my 40 years).

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Wow Pax! That is intresting, thanks! :)

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Wow Pax! That is intresting, thanks! :)

you are quite welcome... glad to be of service :D

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Happens probably 2 or 3 times a year here in Michigan. Not unusual at all.

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I have lived in Calgary Canada most of my life and I have to say I have never seen lightning during a snowstorm ever. I have seen hail storms produce lighning. I have seen snow in the middle of summer befor and I have seen it as warm as 25 degree's C in december,I have seen a couple of tornado's to. Living so close to the Rockies we get some wierd weather,we get what they call Chinooks, warm air comming over the mountains from the pacific that can produce some very strange weather,but no I can't recall ever seeing lightning in a snowstorm ever,not saying it doesn't happen though.

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I live in Maine and for most of the year it snows here and I've never remembered seeing lightning while it was snowy. I'll ask my spouse and his mother and if they say then have then I"ll let ya know-if not then you know it don't. :D

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Happens on the US East Coast almost every winter if we get a particularly nasty "Nor'easter." Thunder, lightning, and storming snow. Just happened during the 30" in Central Park blizzard.

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Posted (edited)

Happens probably 2 or 3 times a year here in Michigan. Not unusual at all.

Yup, that's what I was going to say...

Though, not in the coldest months. Usually at the tail end of winter when it begins to warm up. If during the day it was warmer, then the temp drops at night and a storm is coming, then the cold and warm air mix, we'll have snow and lightening and thunder (more thunder)

Rut ro! Speaking of storms.....YIKES! It's begining to thunder and lightening here now.

Awww, my poor pup is hiding under my desk...lol

Edited by alchemistic

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Hey, send some of that rain to Texas! lol :lol:

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Hey, send some of that rain to Texas! lol :lol:

I sure wish I could!

We live on a lake and I know it'll be darn near Aug till it's dry in our front yard.

It's a tad too soggy here in MI...I want OUT!

Feast of famine, that's the way it is from state to state :yes:

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I think mother nature is playing a joke on us today. We need rain badly, you can see the dark clouds and even smell the rain, but only a 10% chance of rain. :( Hopefully the weatherman was wrong, we could sure use a good down pour.

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I was wondering if someone can help. I'm from deep south Texas and my husband and I keep arguing about whether it lightenings during snowstorms. I have searched the web and found nothing. Could anyone help???

Answer: No.

Maybe in blizzards, but never have i heard such a thing, and im in Canada. :ph34r:

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Well, I appreciate everybody's posts, but it seems that everyone is torn down the middle. Can anyone give me proof that it can happen? :rolleyes:

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From the WTOL-TV Toledo, OH website:

Did I Hear Thunder with Snow?

On Tuesday evening, the snow was falling hard and I thought I heard a rumble of thunder. Is that possible?

Actually thunder occured with the burst of snow. This is a somewhat rare occurence, but the strongest of cold fronts have the potential to produce thunder. The process is almost the same as a summertime thunderstorm. Relatively warm air is found near the surface compared to cold air at high altitudes. This leads to strong vertical motions that push air upward and downward. The movement can lead to thunder and even a rare bolt of lightning. When this happens you can bet there will be a very heavy burst of snow that may lead to extremely low visibilities. Thunderstorms that form in winter are weak and short-lived.

Source: WTOL.com

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From the WTOL-TV Toledo, OH website:

Did I Hear Thunder with Snow?

On Tuesday evening, the snow was falling hard and I thought I heard a rumble of thunder. Is that possible?

Actually thunder occured with the burst of snow. This is a somewhat rare occurence, but the strongest of cold fronts have the potential to produce thunder. The process is almost the same as a summertime thunderstorm. Relatively warm air is found near the surface compared to cold air at high altitudes. This leads to strong vertical motions that push air upward and downward. The movement can lead to thunder and even a rare bolt of lightning. When this happens you can bet there will be a very heavy burst of snow that may lead to extremely low visibilities. Thunderstorms that form in winter are weak and short-lived.

Source: WTOL.com

Thank you!!! You're my hero! I think you just helped me win the bet with my husband!! :D

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Thank you!!! You're my hero! I think you just helped me win the bet with my husband!! :D

I've never been anyone's hero before.

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Oh, by the way, intresting article! :tu:

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