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Aristocrates

Rising oceans

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:huh: Im a little puzzled at how the ice caps melting would make our oceans rise. Would it not make sense that the caps work like ice cubes and therefore when they melt our oceans would actually fall to lower levels instead of rise to higher levels :blink:

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in the last 100 years the earth's temperature has increased about half a degree Celsius. This may not sound like much, but even half a degree can have an effect on our planet. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) the sea level has risen 6 to 8 inches (15 to 20 cm) in the last 100 years.

This higher temperature may be causing some floating icebergs to melt, but this will not make the oceans rise. Icebergs are large floating chunks of ice. In order to float, the iceberg displaces a volume of water that has a weight equal to that of the iceberg. Submarines use this principle to rise and sink in the water by changing their weight.

But the rising temperature and icebergs could play a small role in the rising ocean level. Icebergs are chunks of frozen glaciers that break off from landmasses and fall into the ocean. The rising temperature may be causing more icebergs to form by weakening the glaciers, causing more cracks and making ice more likely to break off. As soon as the ice falls into the ocean, the ocean rises a little.

If the rising temperature affects glaciers and icebergs, could the polar ice caps be in danger of melting and causing the oceans to rise? This could happen, but no one knows when it might happen.

The main ice covered landmass is Antarctica at the South Pole, with about 90 percent of the world's ice (and 70 percent of its fresh water). Antarctica is covered with ice an average of 2,133 meters (7,000 feet) thick. If all of the Antarctic ice melted, sea levels around the world would rise about 61 meters (200 feet). But the average temperature in Antarctica is -37°C, so the ice there is in no danger of melting. In fact in most parts of the continent it never gets above freezing.

At the other end of the world, the North Pole, the ice is not nearly as thick as at the South Pole. The ice floats on the Arctic Ocean. If it melted sea levels would not be affected.

There is a significant amount of ice covering Greenland, which would add another 7 meters (20 feet) to the oceans if it melted. Because Greenland is closer to the equator than Antarctica, the temperatures there are higher, so the ice is more likely to melt.

But there might be a less dramatic reason than polar ice melting for the higher ocean level -- the higher temperature of the water. Water is most dense at 4 degrees Celsius. Above and below this temperature, the density of water decreases (the same weight of water occupies a bigger space). So as the overall temperature of the water increases it naturally expands a little bit making the oceans rise.

In 1995 the International Panel on Climate Change issued a report which contained various projections of the sea level change by the year 2100. They estimate that the sea will rise 50 centimeters (20 inches) with the lowest estimates at 15 centimeters (6 inches) and the highest at 95 centimeters (37 inches). The rise will come from thermal expansion of the ocean and from melting glaciers and ice sheets. Twenty inches is no small amount -- it could have a big effect on coastal cities, especially during storms.

If the polar ice caps melted, how much would the oceans rise?

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If ice melys, the water spreads around the world, raising sea level, but the difference is too small to recognize.

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Too many people are sucked into the media saying that it will rise like 20 feet or something though :(

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:yes:

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Posted (edited)

there's a lot of bad data out there. some of the best ideas we have, however, are from the fact that during the cretaceous, there was no ice. during the cretaceous, Texas was also mostly underwater. so that worries me. i'll just have to invest in bubble living, because i'm not leaving.

Homo sapiens will survive, no doubt, but it will certainly wreak havoc politically, socially, economically, and ecologically.

Edited by FrothyDog

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Posted (edited)

:huh: Im a little puzzled at how the ice caps melting would make our oceans rise. Would it not make sense that the caps work like ice cubes and therefore when they melt our oceans would actually fall to lower levels instead of rise to higher levels :blink:

yep, ice is full of trapped gases that help weigh it down. When the ice melts, that gas escapes and the amount of water displaced is lessed, actually lowering the sea level.

most people seem to have a hard time visualizing this. It helps to fill a glass full of ice, then fill it the rest of the way with water. Once the ice melts, the glass will be less full than before.

edit: now ice that is chilling on land, such as greenland, if it melts it will naturaly raise the sea level a little.

Edited by Mr. 420

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Oh common, we can go higher up to save r selfs! :angry:

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yep, ice is full of trapped gases that help weigh it down. When the ice melts, that gas escapes and the amount of water displaced is lessed, actually lowering the sea level.

most people seem to have a hard time visualizing this. It helps to fill a glass full of ice, then fill it the rest of the way with water. Once the ice melts, the glass will be less full than before.

edit: now ice that is chilling on land, such as greenland, if it melts it will naturaly raise the sea level a little.

Actually, you are wrong...If the ice at the caps melts, then the water reached equlibrium by spreading around the world...It raises the water this way.

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