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cyrus11

Human Perception

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i've always wondred.. how animals that has night vision have built in reflective cells in their retina and so that when flashlight shines on their eyes at night it reflects the light and gives off a glow... thus serving a purpose....

well..since we do not have such cells in our eyes, when lights shine in our eyes at night. our eyes do not glow... although a strange thing happens when UV light hits our eyes.. it glows just as brightly as it does with animals under normal light.. althought we cannot see it with out naked eyes.. it shows clearly in the night vision cameras. i wonder what that purpose serves? do we really have uv reflective cells? if so, what purpose does it serve when we cannot see uv spectrum? and what is the limit of what any human being sees?

can the fact that certain people are able to sense spectrums of light that most normal cannot because of special wiring in their visual cortex? thus explaining being able to see ghosts and other phenomenon? well.. just a thought.

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i've always wondred.. how animals that has night vision have built in reflective cells in their retina and so that when flashlight shines on their eyes at night it reflects the light and gives off a glow... thus serving a purpose....

Just curious . . . reflected light in an animals eyes serves what purpose?

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the reflected light inside the eye of an animal allows it to see more detail at night.

thus a cat's night vision is 6x better than humans.... it all has to do with how the light is reflected off these cells.. and re-intensifies inside he eyeball so that the eye can gather more info from the available light source.... don't you know that? i thought most people know this?

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the reflected light inside the eye of an animal allows it to see more detail at night.

thus a cat's night vision is 6x better than humans.... it all has to do with how the light is reflected off these cells.. and re-intensifies inside he eyeball so that the eye can gather more info from the available light source.... don't you know that? i thought most people know this?

I doubt most people know that :P

Now UV stuff is cool. Maybe we do, or maybe UV is a special type of ray.

Did you take physics? Just wondering?

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Humans don't have that because we don't need it. Oh darn I don't remember how to say this in english, but it is all about your body changing over the years to be able to subsist wherever you live.

You know, it's like the eskimals. They have waaay more fat but that's because their bodies are used to make more fat in order for them to subsist.

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mmmm actually, i don't think a lot of creatures on this planet can see the UV spectrum.

just like a lot of animals cannot see the color red. so when you shine red light on them they won't notice it....... after thinking about it for a while, i believe that the reason our eyes glows in the night vision camera because the inside of our eyeball is dark, and that our eyeball's lens refract/reflect the UV light. like a mirror effect. so it seems like we too have reflective cells in our retina...... on an interesting note....the mantis shrimp are able to see polarized light, and other spectrums that us humans cannot see. :D

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Hmmm. Now that I think about it, it's pretty weird. I wonder if that's also why some people can see auras?

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Posted (edited)

thus explaining being able to see ghosts and other phenomenon? well.. just a thought.

In that case, equipment that is capable of seeing large portions of the electromagnetic spectrum would be able to detect ghosts easily; which isn't the case.

By the way, night vision uses near Infra-Red, not Ultra-Violet.

I'm guessing that Infra-Red waves are just more capable of reflecting of the human retina than visible light, due to their longer wavelength.

Humans don't have that because we don't need it. Oh darn I don't remember how to say this in english, but it is all about your body changing over the years to be able to subsist wherever you live.

You know, it's like the eskimals. They have waaay more fat but that's because their bodies are used to make more fat in order for them to subsist.

Evolution.

Edited by Raptor X7

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damn RX7, you beat me to it...

It's evolution!

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Or, more specifically, Adaptation.

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Or, more specifically, Adaptation.

:tu: That's the word I was thinking of too. :P

If someone were able to see the UV... would everything seen in it look purple?

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damn RX7, you beat me to it...

:P

If someone were able to see the UV... would everything seen in it look purple?

As far as I know it's impossible to say. There isn't any way to see how the brain would interpret the signals, it could be violet, but it could just as well be any other colour, as well as perhaps a completely new one altogether. I'd have to say that out of those options, it would be a new colour, resembling violet more than any other.

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I'm not sure if this is completly relavent to the topic or not, but human eyes are made up of millions of cones and rods...which are the photoreceptors which recieve the light, and help us see.

Cones are what we use in light...cones are able to make out colors, shades etc. But, when it is completly dark, our eyes switch over to using rods. Rods are more sensitive, but can't detect color as well, so they are very well adapted for the dark. perhapes because of it's high sensitivity, rods are more able to reflect UV rays?

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bats can see uv light at least all the ones iv spoken too. :wacko:

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bats can see uv light at least all the ones iv spoken too. :wacko:

Only some species do, most don't. All bats use echolocation though.

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Just adapting to the enviroment. We live in a world where light is always available unlike the animals which can't strike a match to start a fire :P

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