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crystal sage

There is something about Kerala

44 posts in this topic

If one looks at the news headlines about Kerala and the strange happenings there one wonders...something strange is going on here......

The Red Rain...of Kerala

http://www.bsn.org.uk/view_all.php?id=11615

http://observer.guardian.co.uk/world/story...1723913,00.html

http://www.world-science.net/exclusives/06..._specksfrm1.htm

http://www.xenophilia.com/zb0045.htm

http://www.sundayherald.com/53577

Edited by crystal sage

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Hmmm. Sounds interesting.

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Scientists in Britain say they have confirmed that DNA, the genetic blueprint for life, does exist in the mysterious red rain which fell over the Kerala region of India, in 2001.

This could prove to be a key development in the work to find out whether there is any life form in outer space.

The blood-coloured rain caused a storm of controversy among the world’s scientists. When first analysed by Indian laboratories, it was suggested it contained unidentifiable biological cells that could have come from outer space.

Since, then, many theories have been put forward to explain the strange phenomenon, but the latest results, from studies carried out at Cardiff University in Britain, seem to confirm that the red colour does come from living cells, although where they came remains a mystery.

http://www.bsn.org.uk/view_all.php?id=11615

What the.... what's going on? confirmed DNA in red rain? One of must know which way we can go?

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this was an alien conspiracy, the dna is meant to try and kill us. :)

:lol:

It's interesting but I don't think it's got anything to do with et's.

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I read about the red rain in Popular Science a while back. I've been interested to see what they came up with, but nobody has any concrete explanations... I'd love to see where this goes

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Kerala is the remains of an ancient city of ......

"For many years, people have been in search of the almost mythical port, known as Vanchi to locals.

Much-recorded in Roman times, Muziris was a major centre for trade between Rome and southern India - but appeared to have simply disappeared.

Search for India's ancient city

Roman amphora pieces abound in Pattanam

Archaeologists working on India's south-west coast believe they may have solved the mystery of the location of a major port which was key to trade between India and the Roman Empire - Muziris, in the modern-day state of Kerala "

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/south_asia/4970452.stm

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Also.....

The life expectancy for a North American male, with all his chairs and cushions, is 72 years, while the life expectancy for a Keralite male is 70.

After the latest in a long series of literacy campaigns, the United Nations in 1991 certified Kerala as 100 percent literate. Your chances of having an informed conversation are at least as high in Kerala as in Kansas.

Kerala's birth rate hovers near 18 per thousand, compared with 16 per thousand in the United States--and is falling faster.

Demographically, in other words, Kerala mirrors the United States on about one-seventieth the cash. It has problems, of course: There is chronic unemployment, a stagnant economy that may have trouble coping with world markets, and a budget deficit that is often described as out of control. But these are the kinds of problems you find in France. Kerala utterly lacks the squalid drama of the Third World--the beggars reaching through the car window, the children with distended bellies, the baby girls left to die.

http://www.utne.com/web_special/web_specia...cles/656-1.html

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[

What the.... what's going on? confirmed DNA in red rain? One of must know which way we can go?

I've looked at a lot of the sites about it on the internet... what was interesting was that they were living cells 'Without the DNA' :tu:

Edited by crystal sage

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Who, what, or where is kerala?

Edited by sadistic jellyfish of doom

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this was an alien conspiracy, the dna is meant to try and kill us. :)

:lol:

It's interesting but I don't think it's got anything to do with et's.

But then I saw the Credo Mutwa video... :alien:

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=68...mp;q=david+icke

http://www.metatech.org/credo_mutwa.html

and then 'Dulce' and list of underground bases

http://www.think-aboutit.com/Underground/redbookae.html

Then some abductees...and researchers who say that aliens get their nutrition thru their skin...and bathe in products that are blood derivative...

Then if you think about those living cells without DNA that replicate.....could they be the raw material for creating new life...advanced cloning tools??? or could it be their waste materials???...from ???

Also if you look up my other site here on White Powdered Gold...'Starfire' the reputed ancient food of the Gods..mentioned throughout history and often referenced in the Bible...this basic substance is found in small doses the glands..

It's supposedly the elixor to everlasting life...enhanced psychic...supernatural abilities..

It all connects somehow...

Think of all the old tales of Vampires...Catherine the Great bathing in blood...old religious ceremonies of drinking blood.. Credo Mutwa..who is very respected...and when you see the interview...you can tell he's telling the truth...it's like an old uncle or grandpa recounting their wisdom...

Edited by crystal sage

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Who, what, or where is kerala?

It's an animal, a type of bear and it lives in australia.

If not, then it's a breakfast cereal.

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But then I saw the Credo Mutwa video... :alien:

Hhaha that old fool? :lol: Yeah, if you want to learn something ignore science and ask some backward african voodoo shaman. :lol:

Do me favour..

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Hhaha that old fool? :lol: Yeah, if you want to learn something ignore science and ask some backward african voodoo shaman. :lol:

Do me favour..

If you listen to him ..he makes a lot of sense.. and it links up much of history..gives a new perspective of religion...

It's foolish to blindly ignore new information and stay on the safe base of accepted science... :rofl::tu: Because we 'know' that scientists always get it right!! they were right about the flat earth...they were right about....many things until they came up with or get convinced with new ideas....

think of the relatively recent discovery of h. pylori...and how it hard it was to convince other scientist etc of this new idea...

http://www.helico.com/

Science agree that there is something extremely odd about the RED RAIN

Edited by crystal sage

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:( Anyone know about this????

"You have blood on your hands, sir.

You need to make amends

Arundhati Roy's Letter To The CM of Kerala

To

The Chief Minister

Government of Kerala

Thiruvananthapuram

27th February 2003

Dear Sir,

There are some moments in the life of a society when something happens to put its moral fibre on public display. This is one such moment.

The Muthanga atrocity will go down in Kerala’s history as a government’s attempt to decimate an extraordinary and historical struggle for justice by the poorest, most oppressed community in Kerala. It will go down in history because, unlike most ‘struggles’ in Kerala, it is not a petty, cynical fight between political parties jockeying for power. It is the real fight of the truly powerless against the powerful. It is the stuff of which myths are made.

I visited the Muthanga sanctuary (partly used as a eucalyptus plantation for Grasim’s Gwalior Rayons factory, which has recently been closed) where the Kerala Police opened fire on hundreds of adivasis. I visited the Sultan Bathery hospital where the wounded have been admitted. I visited some adivasi settlements close to the sanctuary. I also visited the Calicut jail and met C.K. Janu and Geethanandan, both of whom are recovering after having been badly beaten by the police. Apart from this I spoke with several eyewitnesses to the firing.

For the Kerala Police to open fire on a group of hundreds of people including women, children, old people and infants is an act that has few parallels in recent history. The event that comes to mind is Jallianwallah Bagh. According to eyewitness accounts the official death toll of two is completely untrue. The people I spoke to reported a much higher toll. Had they belonged to any other community that mattered to mainstream political parties, the manner in which the crisis and its fallout were handled would have been quite different.

There is absolutely no justification or excuse for what happened. Even the police version of being provoked by a 'hostage' crisis is not a justification. To open fire like that with no attempt to negotiate shows a deep lack of respect for human life -- not just adivasi lives, but also the lives of the policeman and the forest official who were taken hostage. It is not the way governments in the past have dealt with kidnappings and hijackings by real militants. While those who killed the policeman must certainly be punished, you cannot hold all the people present there -- or the Adivasi Gothra Mahasabha or indeed the entire adivasi community -- responsible for that act.

Survivors who I spoke to in hospital were less traumatised by their own injuries than by the fact that many of their family members including small children had gone missing. I met a man whose child had fallen from his arms when he was brought down by a police lathi and has been missing since then. There are others, women and old people missing. It is not known whether they are dead, or alive or hiding, hurt and hungry in the sanctuary.

A week has passed and no effort has been made to draw up lists of the missing and crosscheck them with jail and hospital records and reassure those who are rigid with grief and uncertainty about their loved ones. Can you even bear to think how you would feel in their place?

Meanwhile the police is terrorising adivasis in the region. Policemen enter settlements and arbitrarily arrest the men folk, beating them and dragging them away. Their families have no idea what has become of them. When we approached the villages we found ghost-settlements with only a few frightened women and children. The men who remained all ran away. It took a lot to persuade them that we were not government officials or police-informers. Clearly the intention is to stamp out the struggle completely. By visiting this kind of vicious reprisal on the whole community, the government hopes that people will blame their leaders for putting them on the path that lead to such terrible times for them. It is a ruthless political game by accomplished players.

Journalists and cameramen have been threatened and intimidated. After the firing they were denied access to the interiors of the sanctuary where people went to hide. For fifteen hours after the firing the place was closed to the media. Nobody knows what really happened during that period. In an attempt to terrorise members of civil society who may have any sympathies with the adivasis, the police have arrested a DIET (District Institute for Educational Training) lecturer K.K. Surendran. He was tortured in custody and reports say that he has a ruptured ear drum. At the moment he is being held in Kannur jail.

The result of this police-raj is that adivasis are too frightened to go to work. People are frightened to employ them. In effect, they are starving to death in their villages -- their ration cards have been burnt in the carnage. This is an exacerbation of the situation that led them to fight for the return of their alienated lands in the first place.

This is to urge you to immediately release people who have been held on baseless charges and see that they are able to return safely to their villages. Most have lost all their worldly possessions -- they have no food, no vessels to carry water, and no clothes to wear. (People and well-wishers had to take them clothes in jail). Everything has been burned and destroyed by the police in their 'action'.

Forgotten in the reportage about the carnage and its aftermath is the fact that this confrontation was the outcome of yet another cynical promise by the Government of Kerala to provide land to 53,000 adivasi families by the end of December 2002. It was another link in the chain of 28 years of unforgivable manipulation. Ours is a nation built on the jagged shards of politicians’ broken promises.

You have blood on your hands, sir. You need to make amends. And quickly.

Yours truly,

(Signed)

Arundhati Roy

P.S: A small observation: In its eagerness to restore the Eucalyptus plantation to its pristine condition, apart from killing human beings, between bouts of firing the police squadron had a picnic lunch. The plastic cups and plates scattered on the ‘eco-sensitive’ battlefield tell a story. This one meal by the guardians of the State produced more non- biodegradable waste than the homes and worldly possessions of one thousand adivasis families.

Arundhati Roy

U 18 Green Park

New Delhi"

http://www.countercurrents.org/hr-roy.htm

http://www.ahrchk.net/ua/mainfile.php/2003/416/

:no::hmm: ....and this??...

http://www.hindu.com/2005/08/15/stories/2005081506520500.htm

...and this...

http://www.humanrightskerala.com/index.php...81&Itemid=5

Edited by crystal sage

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Would like to see a group of scientists come together and get one conclusion on this. Never heard anything about the attack on the village. How terrible that something like that from ones own country can happen.

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I was just thinking...how all this Red Rain would have entered the water supply...affected the crops...how has wild life etc changed since then..the people???

Even if were meteor dust...or in the case of some UFOlogist... space ships emptying their larders of bathable blood..wastes from their genetic experiments...

It must have affected the environment somehow.. affected the residents..chemically.somehow....

On the internet Keral is seen as one of the top 10 tourist places!!! :rofl::lol: ..unless that was just good advertising....

As for the mass slaughter....it's common for atrocious news like that not to get any or very little publicity.....

think of Teinamin Square.. Some Chinese students have never heard of it... when I talked to them they said it wasn't taught at their schools and that they believe it never happened ... we had to show them news reports to prove it!!!.. Censorship?? or was it false news...??? who knows...???

http://www.radiocurious.org/the_interviews_wh_alpha.htm

..and check this out!!! :(

"Age Concern Discussions Forums - All our yesterdaysGoogle have agreed to delete any bits that refer to Teinamin Square and the shooting of innocent protestors.I have agreed with me to stop using google. ...

www.ageconcern.org.uk/discuss/messageview.cfm?catid=8&threadid=2400&STARTPAGE=74 - 69k - Cached - Similar pages "

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Red Rains are nothing new. For centuries this sort of thing has been recorded.. red rains, yellow rains, black inky rains, etc.

There was one case of red rain If i remember correctly that rained on a small tree and killed it and the person outside got hit with it and got sick. Just more fortunata to add to the stack. But very interesting none the less

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I thought it was(and sorry if this was posted before but I didn't read all of the posts) a specie of red algae(that fall as "rain").

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http://www.astrobiology.cf.ac.uk/redrain.html

"Samples of a red rain that fell across the state of Kerala in India in July-August 2001 have been found to contain microscopic red cells (Louis and Kumar, 2006) of unknown origin. The early fall was associated with the 'thunder' and flash of a large meteor. They report that the cells appear to be very unusual in lacking a nucleus and DNA. Dr. Godfrey Louis kindly supplied us with a sample of this material for independent investigation in Cardiff.

High resolution electron microscopy has revealed internal structures as well as evidence of a replication cycle not commonly found in either bacteria or yeasts. These images are of thin cell slices viewed in the transmission electron microscope. "

....the site shows lab photos of them....

The first (above) shows three cells around 3 micrometres in diameter, with thick cell walls and a variety of nanostructures within a membrane, but with no identifiable nucleus. Apparent holes in the cell wall are real. The cell on the right has larger holes and may have lost its cytoplasm.

Edited by crystal sage

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Here I found some more info...ideas on it.....

http://www.publicenemy.com/pb/viewtopic.ph...25672&sid=1

What other explanations are there? Wainwright likens the red cells to spores from a rust fungus, or possibly pollen or algae. With Wickramasinghe and others, Wainwright has shown in balloon experiments that winds can carry microbes from the ground to high altitudes. Particles the size of those in the red rain could soar several kilometres above the Earth's surface. The dimpled shape could easily have arisen when the cells collapsed in the microscopy process. If that were true, he says, then the only mystery concerns the lack of DNA. "You wouldn't expect spores, microbes or algae not to have any DNA," he says. The simplest explanation is that Louis's experiments missed it, so Wainwright wants to repeat the tests. If the cells do turn out to contain DNA, then there is no great mystery. "I'd kind of relax if there was DNA there," says Wainwright.

If there is no DNA, Wainwright argues, the cells might be something extraordinary. He speculates, like Louis, that the lack of DNA might point to some kind of exotic life form, although he admits it would be paradoxical for cells without DNA to be classed as "living".

Cockell argues that there could be a simpler explanation - the red particles are actually blood. "They look like red blood cells to me," he says. The size fits just right; red blood cells are normally about 6 to 8 micrometres wide. They are naturally dimpled just like the red rain particles. What's more, mammalian red blood cells contain no DNA because they don't have a cell nucleus.

It's tough to explain, however, how 50 tonnes of mammal blood could have ended up in rain clouds. Cockell takes a wild guess that maybe a meteor explosion massacred a flock of bats, splattering their blood in all directions. India is home to around 100 species of bats, which sometimes fly to altitudes of 3 kilometres or more. "A giant flock of bats is actually a possibility - maybe a meteor airburst occurred during a bat migration," he says. "But one would have to wonder where the bat wings are."

Walker agrees that the particles in the red rain look uncannily like red blood cells. He says a simple test for haemoglobin could resolve this quickly. "If they believe they aren't red blood cells, then they need to explain how they've managed to eliminate that possibility," says Cockell. "I would have thought some more basic biochemical analysis of these cells would be worthwhile, and that should identify it, whatever it is."

"It's a pity that they don't realise this is interesting without all the extraterrestrial hype," Cockell adds. "How might you get blood into rain? I don't think anyone has observed an event where they've seen an animal ripped apart and its blood distributed in clouds. In some ways, that whole process is far more interesting than what Louis is trying to prove." For blood cells to survive would be astonishing: normally they would be destroyed within minutes if kept in rainwater, unless the salinity was the same as inside the blood cell.

In the next few weeks, the mystery of Kerala's red rain may finally be solved. Louis sent samples to Wickramasinghe's lab in Cardiff last month. As New Scientist went to press, he and Wainwright were still analysing them.

If they can't explain the origin of the samples, then the suggestion that they are alien life will gain credence. In that case, someone will have to verify an observation that Louis made which even he finds astonishing: that the cells replicate. In earlier unpublished papers, Louis says he cultured the red rain cells in unconventional nutrients, such as cedar wood oil, and showed that these DNA-devoid microbes divide happily at a temperature of 300 °C. Louis admits he left these claims out of his latest paper because he thought they would be considered "too extraordinary".

Extraordinary is an understatement: if the cells really do replicate we'll have found the first evidence of extraterrestrial life. In the end, though, I didn't find any scientist willing to bet that the red rain of Kerala contained aliens. But everyone agreed it's a cracking good story that's crying out for a proper explanation. "I think you've got to be intrigued," said Wainwright. "If you're not intrigued, then what are you doing in science?"

From issue 2541 of New Scientist magazine, 02 March 2006, page 34

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Wainwright. "If you're not intrigued, then what are you doing in science?"

From issue 2541 of New Scientist magazine, 02 March 2006, page 34

Yeah good point-"If you're not intrigued, then what are you doing in science?"

From New Scientist magazine? Interested in the red rain! Cool.

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>> LOL !!! more weird things happening in Kerala!!!!!! :tu:

http://www.mg.co.za/articlepage.aspx?area=...rticleid=278637

http://today.reuters.co.uk/news/articlenew...XML&src=rss

"NEW DELHI (Reuters) - The people of Kerala in India's southwest are famed for turning fish into spicy feasts fit for gods, but last week the heavens turned provider as fish rained down on the village of Manna, a newspaper reported on Monday.

When the clouds broke last Thursday, villagers said they saw small, pencil-thin live fish falling from the sky.

"Initially no one noticed it. But soon, we saw some slushy objects on the ground and noticed some slight movement," Abubaker, a local shop owner, was quoted as saying in the Hindustan Times.

"I alone collected 30 ice-cold fish of which many died," said the resident of Manna, 20 km (12 miles) from Kannur, in the north of the state.

Locals said the fish looked like parals, a common freshwater fish found in lakes and rivers.

Similar reports of objects falling from the sky -- including frogs and tomatoes -- have been put down to spiralling whirlwinds or waterspouts which suck them up from land or water. They fall back to earth once the wind speed drops and can no longer support them."

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