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speshall mareens

Dilophosaurus

41 posts in this topic

for a long time paleantologists have debated over the point of crests on dinosaurs and even living animals as well as using them to support there argument. i just wanna no what others think. i'll be back in a little, i wanna go make fun of the idiots who believe in aliens and big foot. or not whatever works.

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I believe those were used to attract mates, but didn't they also debate if it produced poison as well?

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doubt it, those movies are not quite acureate. but i thought i heard something about it. as to the frill, no way of proving that. still, destroy all humas is an awsome game( refering to pic). yah mating is the most plausible answer as the crests are fragile, but there is still heat regulation and territory. the same things with spined animals really.

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doubt it, those movies are not quite acureate. but i thought i heard something about it. as to the frill, no way of proving that. still, destroy all humas is an awsome game( refering to pic). yah mating is the most plausible answer as the crests are fragile, but there is still heat regulation and territory. the same things with spined animals really.

thanks for the compliment, but I'm not referring to Jurassic Park. They said they found two weird holes behind the eye holes in the skull that possibly held venom sacs.

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entirely possible, but it all really depends on when the first venom evovled. they could be for tears. :cry: or an extraordinary fragile part of the skull that was broken.

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That would be an intereting subject to investigate, when did venom evolve in reptiles?

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Oh, I almost forgot. Welcome to Unexplained Mysteries Speshall Mareens! Try not to make "too" much fun of the bigfoot and alien believers.

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Dilophosaurus did not make poison. In no way to our knowledge were they venemous.

The crest, which is also present in Lillienasaurus and Crylophosaurus was probably used to attract mates.

See this link for the evolution of snake venom:

http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/21/5/870

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Thanks for the link Frogfish.

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Like the Lambeosaurus, it was most likely used for distinguishing sex and age. More often than not, juveniles of species with crests are usually crestless, and they slowly grow the crest in with passing years. It could have even been used as a status thing.

Several species had crests on their heads that were used for communication by blowing air through it like a horn, although I doubt that was the usage of the Dilophosaurus crest.

And yes, the poison from JP was created by the author of the book, while the size of the creature in the movie was severly reduced as well. Movies play little role in fact.

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Several species had crests on their heads that were used for communication by blowing air through it like a horn

Yup, such as Saurolophus and Parasaurolophus. Lambeosaurus and Corythosaurus did not have hollow crests. Dilophosaurus's crest is not hollow either, and was probably used as a display.

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Maybe the frills wre covered in skin and that area of skin had pigments like a chameleon skins. It could've been used to distiunguish there moods.

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Maybe the frills wre covered in skin and that area of skin had pigments like a chameleon skins. It could've been used to distiunguish there moods.

Dilophosaurus never had frills, and we have no idea how the skin looked. For all we know, they could of been drab brown or hot pink (although very unlikley :P ).

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Like the Lambeosaurus, it was most likely used for distinguishing sex and age. More often than not, juveniles of species with crests are usually crestless, and they slowly grow the crest in with passing years. It could have even been used as a status thing.

Several species had crests on their heads that were used for communication by blowing air through it like a horn, although I doubt that was the usage of the Dilophosaurus crest.

And yes, the poison from JP was created by the author of the book, while the size of the creature in the movie was severly reduced as well. Movies play little role in fact.

like deer and elk and moose., there crests had to be for display they were to fragile for anything else

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Dilophosaurus never had frills, and we have no idea how the skin looked. For all we know, they could of been drab brown or hot pink (although very unlikley :P ).

I'm sorry, I meant the frills on the tops of its head. I don't want to sound retarded because I know the difference between the compltetely bogus (but cool) dilophosaurus from JP and the actual 20 foot predator.

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Dilophosaurus did not make poison. In no way to our knowledge were they venemous.

The crest, which is also present in Lillienasaurus and Crylophosaurus was probably used to attract mates.

See this link for the evolution of snake venom:

http://mbe.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/full/21/5/870

we more or less ment evolution of venom in general, ti was before the dinosaurs actually, i just remambered. it was the gie=ant spiders during the cambrien. or whenever all the coal came from.

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Venom probably evolved very early. Hmmm, I should research that. I wonder if it evolved during the Devonian or before..

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probably with the giant sea scopins or the jelly fish, but etleast the scorpians.

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Sea scorpions did not even have "stingers"...

And jellyfish don;t have venom. They have nematocysts

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they did have stingers, but hey probably just used it for hitting they're prey no vonom injected. just beatin the crap out of it. so no i guess they weren't "stingers".

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linked-image

Sea Scorpion

They just have paddle/club tails.

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They just have paddle/club tails.

Are you sure of that? I read some species had a spiked tail, that may have been used to inject venom, like in modern scorpions...

linked-image

Eurypterid AKA Sea Scorpion

LINK-> Eurypterid

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I believe Brontoscorpio had a venomous sting.

Frogfish jellyfish nematocysts inject venom when they fire.

I'm pretty sure every spider has venom too.

But I would go with Cnidarians such as jellyfish, anemones and corals as being the first developers of venoms. (though some bacteria use something similar I am not sure it is truely venom).

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yes, all spiders have venom. venom is really old, its been around since complex organisms evolved :blink: still considering the amount of dinosaur diversity, you would think that atleast one would some sort of venom. most likely like that of the komodo dragon. carnosaurs could have used ot to take down large surapods. if you can't keep up with your prey, you must adapt. however this is just a speculation so fell free to cricize.

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yes, all spiders have venom. venom is really old, its been around since complex organisms evolved :blink: still considering the amount of dinosaur diversity, you would think that atleast one would some sort of venom. most likely like that of the komodo dragon. carnosaurs could have used ot to take down large surapods. if you can't keep up with your prey, you must adapt. however this is just a speculation so fell free to cricize.

you might be right actually, what if there is an undiscovered species that somehow perfected the production of venom. Maybe it would be a small compsagnuthus creature that spat venom. or a big burly carnosaur that used bacterua like the komodo dragon, or even like a gila monster

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