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What is the Antikythera mechanism ?

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user posted image rIn October, 2005, a truck pulled up outside the National Archeological Museum in Athens, and workers began unloading an eight-ton X-ray machine that its designer, X-Tek Systems of Great Britain, had dubbed the Bladerunner. Standing just inside the National Museum’s basement was Tony Freeth, a sixty-year-old British mathematician and filmmaker, watching as workers in white T-shirts wrestled the Range Rover-size machine through the door and up the ramp into the museum.

news icon View: Full Article | Source: New Yorker

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Nice. I hate saying the word "Antikythera". It doesn't wanna come out right half the time..haha.

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Nice. I hate saying the word "Antikythera". It doesn't wanna come out right half the time..haha.

I just associate the syllabols with words I know. So it would be antique-e-terror. LOL!

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But it is an interesting artifact none the less. Where did it come from who made it? were there others like it? or other examples of the same technology level?

Its not a new thing its been around for a while, how come we still don't know much about it?

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Ancient Moon 'computer' revisited

By Jonathan Fildes

Science and technology reporter, BBC News

The delicate workings at the heart of a 2,000-year-old analogue computer have been revealed by scientists.

The Antikythera Mechanism, discovered more than 100 years ago in a Roman shipwreck, was used by ancient Greeks to display astronomical cycles.

Using advanced imaging techniques, an Anglo-Greek team probed the remaining fragments of the complex geared device.

The results, published in the journal Nature, show it could have been used to predict solar and lunar eclipses.

The elaborate arrangement of bronze gears may also have displayed planetary information.

"This is as important for technology as the Acropolis is for architecture," said Professor John Seiradakis of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki in Greece, and one of the team. "It is a unique device."

However, not all experts agree with the team's interpretation of the mechanism.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/6191462.stm

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