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John Rambos Da

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never mind the mystery of the Kursk or How many russian seamen davy robbins can fit in his windsock or how the dinosaurs died out, surely we should be asking why these fellas did and should we bring them back to life??

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6284214.stm

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never mind the mystery of the Kursk or How many russian seamen davy robbins can fit in his windsock or how the dinosaurs died out, surely we should be asking why these fellas did and should we bring them back to life??

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/6284214.stm

If it is one or two for studying purposes, why not. Trying to recreate mammoth herds on the other hand would be slightly to risky as we don't know anything about them. We know nothing of their feeding needs. We know nothing about their social behavior and needs.

Just because they "kind of look"like an elephant does not mean that we can transpose them 1 to 1 into an Elephant habitat.

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A mammoth would be interesting. They could study it to see how mammoths evolved into elephants.

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I believe the only way to properly study any animal we have had no contact with beyond our recient technilogical advancements is to clone a FEW of these beautiful animals and study them, but it is also important for the public to be able to see these creatures in there own habitat, such as a zoo. we will have to supply a diverse selection of fauna, but i believe it could be done.

Sorry for the run-ons and the such, im at work and have limited time here..

Thanks!

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real life jurassic park, wow!

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Posted (edited)

real life Jurassic park, wow!

lol yes, but not to that extent. I'm talking about possibly cloning 1 creature at a time, along with a mate (if possible). Then wait for it to either prosper or eventually die (which is the most likely case) and then start on a new creature. that way there aren't any horrendous accidents, viral outbreaks, people getting eaten... that sorta thing. lol

edit: spelling

Edited by Sm0k3

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UMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM Mammoth Burger MMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMMM

post-56391-1184084677_thumb.jpg

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Moved to the appropriate section of this forum.

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I believe the only way to properly study any animal we have had no contact with beyond our recient technilogical advancements is to clone a FEW of these beautiful animals and study them, but it is also important for the public to be able to see these creatures in there own habitat, such as a zoo. we will have to supply a diverse selection of fauna, but i believe it could be done.

Sorry for the run-ons and the such, im at work and have limited time here..

Thanks!

???

Mammoths are extinct and thats that. No matter how much I would love to see one I just don't think its right. Mammoths had their chance.

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It would be cruel to bring them back, with earth warming up and they have all that hair the poor things would be sweating...lol.lol

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???

Mammoths are extinct and thats that. No matter how much I would love to see one I just don't think its right. Mammoths had their chance.

I agree to some extent, it wouldn't be right for the animal, but think of all the things we can learn about prehistoric animals if we had the opportunity to study a living one. we may be able to save some endangered species from our time, who knows what we may be able to learn from them? we have yet to have the opportunity to find out!

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It would be cruel to bring them back, with earth warming up and they have all that hair the poor things would be sweating...lol.lol

how is this different than the polar bears that are living in the zoos across southwestern USA? the habitats would have to be suited for them, but it can be done.

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I think we should bring back sabre tooth tiger, and have a new Vegas Show.

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Ahoy,

I have always had mixed feelings on this. I would love to see an extinct animal returned to life. The mammoth, dinosaurs, etc. As for habitat, the Earth has enough diversity of climate zones that we could very easily put the animal into a very close match to the original climate it came from. The problem is we really wouldn’t learn too much about the animals. They would be raised in a human induced and controlled environment and wouldn’t have the same interaction and development of the original animals. We would be able to learn what the animal looked, moved and sounded like, but very little about its natural behavior. True, some of the animal’s instinctual behavior would come through, but we would have no way of knowing what is “natural” for the animal and what is “adapted” due to the human interference. Think of the vast behavioral differences between any animal raised in the “wild” as opposed to a like animal raised in captivity. So, I guess from the point of curiosity, I think if we have the science to bring the mammoth back, why not? The mammoth wouldn’t know that this isn’t how it is supposed to live and it would be neat to see a living mammoth. But I wouldn’t expect to learn too much about the animals.

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Ahoy,

I have always had mixed feelings on this. I would love to see an extinct animal returned to life. The mammoth, dinosaurs, etc. As for habitat, the Earth has enough diversity of climate zones that we could very easily put the animal into a very close match to the original climate it came from. The problem is we really wouldn’t learn too much about the animals. They would be raised in a human induced and controlled environment and wouldn’t have the same interaction and development of the original animals. We would be able to learn what the animal looked, moved and sounded like, but very little about its natural behavior. True, some of the animal’s instinctual behavior would come through, but we would have no way of knowing what is “natural” for the animal and what is “adapted” due to the human interference. Think of the vast behavioral differences between any animal raised in the “wild” as opposed to a like animal raised in captivity. So, I guess from the point of curiosity, I think if we have the science to bring the mammoth back, why not? The mammoth wouldn’t know that this isn’t how it is supposed to live and it would be neat to see a living mammoth. But I wouldn’t expect to learn too much about the animals.

You bring up a good point, human intervention. even though we may never truly know how these animals acted in nature, but there is no end to what these animals can teach us. Who knows, the common everyday mammoth may hold the cure to the AIDS/HIV virus in its system. the possibilities are endless.

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