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  Thylacine Skeleton
     
Thylacine Skeleton
Image credit: CC-BY-SA-3.0 FunkMonk / Wikimedia

Uploader comment: A Thylacine skeleton at the Natural History Museum in Paris.

Image status: EXPLAINED The Tasmanian Tiger ( Thylacine ) was a real animal that was hunted to extinction in Australia in the 19th and early 20th century.

   

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Comments on this image:
Some comments may be from an earlier revision of this image.
Comment icon #5 Posted by psychicjlee on 5 May, 2011, 2:02
some 1 had it big for these creatures didnt they
Comment icon #4 Posted by mr rainbow on 15 April, 2011, 1:34
cuz the baby in the jar is still in th ejar
Comment icon #3 Posted by mr rainbow on 15 April, 2011, 1:34
i dont think this skeleton is of the baby in a jar...
Comment icon #2 Posted by hajime on 22 July, 2010, 5:11
though i wonder if all those years spent in a jar witn formaldehyde corrupted the tissues... would be a shame if so. it would be soo cool to have them back. just breed them so theyre like house dogs, and not like tigers that kill all the sheep
Comment icon #1 Posted by hajime on 22 July, 2010, 5:10
thats that baby they should be trying to clone
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April 1, 2005, 6:48 am
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