Friday, October 20, 2017
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help   RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in
  Total images: 9,296   Total comments: 32,310   
Login or Register to upload an image.
  Thylacine on display

Thylacine on display
Image credit: CC-BY-SA-3.0 Panarria / Wikimedia

Uploader comment: A stuffed Thylacine on display at a Spanish museum.

Image status: EXPLAINED The Tasmanian Tiger ( Thylacine ) was a real animal that was hunted to extinction in Australia in the 19th and early 20th century.

   

 
Comments on this image:
Some comments may be from an earlier revision of this image.
Comment icon #10 Posted by dantheman2435 on 1 July, 2005, 5:21
At least we get to see what these creatures looked like alive.
Comment icon #9 Posted by kenzie_the_unexplained on 10 October, 2005, 12:49
They need to find one, and friggin' clone it, constantly, so it can survive, raise it in captivity, except in an realistic envoirenment,(SP?)so it can breed succsessfully!
Comment icon #8 Posted by mr rainbow on 15 April, 2011, 1:33
CLONE IT CLONE IT CLONE IT CLONE IT
Comment icon #7 Posted by chise8340 on 31 May, 2011, 5:39
They have attempted to clone the Thylacine, with no success, unfortunately. I've heard rumor that they did clone one, but it died not too long after. I am not sure if that rumor is true, however.
Comment icon #6 Posted by kitco on 5 June, 2011, 18:34
WHY did we kill em all?
Comment icon #5 Posted by pitbulls1225 on 14 July, 2011, 17:43
that looks sorta like A COTE with a lil bit of of TIGET and HYANA
Comment icon #4 Posted by Em Cornish on 24 July, 2011, 10:47
They're so beautiful
Comment icon #3 Posted by E-K-A-99 on 26 July, 2011, 19:04
awww its cute why kill it 2 the point of extinction?! how things are 2day it could have been a house-pet or something... by the way i dont think making a clone of a doll is gunnu help
Comment icon #2 Posted by andytmann on 5 August, 2012, 6:31
The way man has hunted animals to extinction is terible. Just think of what we could have learned from these poor creatures. The world is a poorer place without them in it.
Comment icon #1 Posted by magikgoddess on 12 July, 2014, 2:15
There may be a couple still living in the remotest part of Australia/Tasmania hiding from any human contact (you can't blame them if that's the case!). Just look at the coelacanth, scientists that they went extinct 65 million years ago but fishermen catch some every few years it seems... I'm just saying stranger then have happened then 'extinct' creators being (re)discovered.


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


Image information
UM-Bot
April 1, 2005, 12:48 pm
Revised: Oct 19, 2010
Views:
Comments:
File size:
25835
10
55.69k
 
Recent news stories
Huge 50km-long cave discovered on the Moon
Posted 10-19-2017 | 16 comments
The Japanese space agency JAXA has announced the discovery of a cave hidden beneath the lunar surface.
 
When you die you are aware that you are dead
Posted 10-19-2017 | 16 comments
A new study has suggested that the mind can still be active even after the body stops showing signs of life.
 
Google invents an AI that learns on its own
Posted 10-18-2017 | 18 comments
The search giant has developed an artificial intelligence capable of learning without human intervention.
 
Saturn's rings are raining down methane
Posted 10-18-2017 | 2 comments
NASA has revealed the discovery of methane and other chemicals in the gas giant's upper atmosphere.
 
48 million-year-old bird fossil unearthed
Posted 10-18-2017 | 3 comments
A prehistoric species of bird that preened itself like a flamingo has been discovered in Germany.
 
Bolsover Castle is voted 'England's spookiest'
Posted 10-17-2017 | 5 comments
Built on an ancient burial ground, Bolsover Castle in Derbyshire has a reputation for being haunted.
 
Miami politician was 'abducted by aliens'
Posted 10-17-2017 | 17 comments
Congressional candidate Bettina Rodriguez Aguilera recalls having alien abduction experiences as a child.
 
Whales and dolphins lead 'human-like lives'
Posted 10-17-2017 | 8 comments
Scientists have linked the brain size of cetaceans to the 'human-like' nature of their social behaviors.
 
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.7 Unexplained-Mysteries.com 2001-2017
Privacy Policy and Disclaimer   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ