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Beijing to test giant smog pollution vacuum


Posted on Wednesday, 23 October, 2013 | Comment icon 17 comments

Pollution in some of China's cities has reached catastrophic levels. Image Credit: CC BY-SA 2.0 Ilya Haykinson
A novel new technique for dealing with smog is to be trialled in one of China's largest cities.
Pollution has become increasingly problematic in China in recent years with smog enveloping its largest cities on a regular basis. The level of pollution is now so bad that it can often exceed 300 micrograms per cubic meter for days at a time and wearing a face mask outdoors has become commonplace.

Authorities have been trying to deal with the issue by imposing limits on factories and traffic when the pollution is particularly heavy, however Dutch artist Daan Roosegaarde has come up with an intriguing new approach that could prove to be far more effective.

Roosegaarde has devised what he calls an "electronic vacuum cleaner", a device that uses static to attract smog particles out of the air. He plans to set up a large scale version in a park in Beijing as a demonstration of the system's effectiveness.

If the setup works it will clear an area of 2090 square meters in an otherwise smog-filled sky, giving the city's inhabitants a taste of what it would be like to live in a smog-free environment.

"Here, the absence of the smog is the design and I like that," said Roosegaarde whose previous artistic inventions have included a dance floor that generates electricity and a highway that's connected to the Internet. "For me design is not about chairs and lamps or tables, what you know Dutch design to be. I like thinking of designs that enable and improve life."

Source: Gizmodo | Comments (17)

Tags: China, Smog


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #8 Posted by freetoroam on 23 October, 2013, 21:48
Why not tax the hell out of high polluting companies until they can produce without the high level of pollutants they they are now? Seems silly to have a product to vacuum up the smog, instead of determining that companies adopt more modern non polluting methods. It's treating the symptom rather than the cause. And who is going to tax China?
Comment icon #9 Posted by pallidin on 23 October, 2013, 22:22
And who is going to tax China? True enough. It's not a "tax", per se, rather more of a financial penalty and in some cases execution. China's leader's won't ever admit that THEY allowed this problem to exist in the interest of greedy State monies. Rather, they will just penalize, imprison and chop a few heads-off to deflect the REAL blame(theirselve's)
Comment icon #10 Posted by Eldorado on 24 October, 2013, 2:24
What if it sucked up birds? Or people! Hoovers don't discriminate and well, Chinese people are kinda small.
Comment icon #11 Posted by Metal Head on 24 October, 2013, 6:29
I thought of this years ago. My idea was all the high rise buildings could have large fans at the top with some kind of filtration systems that could clean the air.
Comment icon #12 Posted by YukiEsmaElite0 on 24 October, 2013, 17:04
I think we should all get together and destroy all sources of the polution. It seems far more effective.
Comment icon #13 Posted by FlyingAngel on 24 October, 2013, 18:19
great, now people is aware that there will be someone cleaning up their mess and start to pollute even more actually, it clears the sky mean all the dust will be drawn toward the ground which probably mean you'll breath in the dust even more. We're humans, not birds
Comment icon #14 Posted by LimeGelatin on 25 October, 2013, 23:39
It sounds about as smart as a science fiction author starting his own religion... But, we all know that worked out fine... -Good luck!
Comment icon #15 Posted by Sir Wearer of Hats on 26 October, 2013, 3:28
I tihnk it'll be easier to give people gills that filter out the smog.
Comment icon #16 Posted by RichardRoma on 1 November, 2013, 20:52
I wonder how much fossil fuel will need to be burned in order to generate the amount of electricity required to run one of this giant smog vacuum. I'm sure one smog vacuum is not enough to take care of the problem.
Comment icon #17 Posted by bulveye on 1 November, 2013, 22:10
I wonder how much fossil fuel will need to be burned in order to generate the amount of electricity required to run one of this giant smog vacuum. I'm sure one smog vacuum is not enough to take care of the problem. Probably a lot considering the scale of it. I just wish governments were forward thinking and really encouraged renewable clean energy instead of spending trillions on war.


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