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Woolly mammoth to go on display in Taiwan


Posted on Friday, 8 November, 2013 | Comment icon 3 comments

The last mammoths died out around 4,500 years ago. Image Credit: CC BY-SA 2.0 Flying Puffin
The preserved remains of a 39,000-year-old mammoth will be put on show as part of an ice age exhibition.
The mammoth, nicknamed 'Yuka', was discovered in Siberia in 2010 and is considered one of the best preserved specimens ever found. Thought to have died at around the age of 10, the mammoth measures approximately 3m in length and is 1.65m tall.

Yuka's discovery made headlines around the world when it was revealed that palaeontologists had found actual liquid blood and muscle tissue inside, something that many thought to be impossible.

The mammoth will be joining the preserved remains of a woolly rhinoceros along with more than 200 other specimens of extinct prehistoric animals such as sabre-tooth cats and ancient species of bison and antelope.

Former Taipei Zoo Director Jason Yeh has said that he hopes the exhibition will help encourage people to cherish the species that are alive today and to do more to prevent them from going extinct.

Source: Focus Taiwan | Comments (3)

Tags: Mammoth


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by paperdyer on 8 November, 2013, 19:33
I take it, based on the size, 10 years old means the mammoth was still a child. From the picture the mammoth does look well preserved. I get the impression that the the Zoo direct thinks Mammoths were precious animals. ""Many precious animals are facing the threat of extinction today," Yeh said, adding that he hopes the exhibition will also encourage people to cherish the earth and do more to protect the environment." I hope when the human race is going extinct, we'll be saved becasue we're precious.
Comment icon #2 Posted by TheGreatBeliever on 10 November, 2013, 14:26
Quick clone it clone it!
Comment icon #3 Posted by Controller Junkie on 18 November, 2013, 2:15
if its possible to clone sheep, cows and im sure humans with the technology we have then shouldnt we be able to clone extinct species such as the mammoth. Would be totally awesome to go to alaska wilderness and see a brought back population of mammoths. In theory this could also help endangered species, which would greatly help our ecosystem. why arent we trying to do something of the sort?


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