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New Felix Baumgartner jump footage released


Posted on Monday, 3 February, 2014 | Comment icon 10 comments

Baumgartner fell over 127,000ft. Image Credit: YouTube / GoPro
The breathtaking new video shows a first person view of the jump from space in unprecedented detail.
Austrian skydiver Felix Baumgartner became a household name after his record-breaking jump from a high altitude capsule back in October 2012. After leaping from the platform he plummeted more than 127,000ft to the Earth at speeds of up to 843.6 miles per hour.

The sensational dive was filmed by a set of seven GoPro cameras and now thanks to newly released footage of the event it is possible to get a taste for what it was like on the way down.

Included in the footage is a first-person view of the harrowing moment the descent turned in to a deadly spin along with the reactions of his team on the ground after he managed to regain control.

The original event was live-streamed on to YouTube and watched by over 8 million people worldwide.


Source: LA Times | Comments (10)

Tags: Felix Baumgartner


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by mushymopman on 3 February, 2014, 12:59
Words are not enough to describe what this guy did, he without any doubt has the biggest balls on the planet and off it.
Comment icon #2 Posted by Child of Bast on 3 February, 2014, 16:16
It's already been more than a year since he did it?!
Comment icon #3 Posted by Rlyeh on 3 February, 2014, 16:52
Darth Vader at 1:40?
Comment icon #4 Posted by ancient astronaut on 3 February, 2014, 17:15
This still amazes me every time I watch it. I think that Travis Pastrana would have done this sans suit ,mask and with no clothes on, the dude is NUTS.
Comment icon #5 Posted by Rafterman on 3 February, 2014, 19:34
Respect.
Comment icon #6 Posted by pallidin on 4 February, 2014, 5:54
That was one heck of a jump.
Comment icon #7 Posted by keninsc on 4 February, 2014, 7:12
That's awesome. Did you notice that the atmosphere was so thing that at the beginning his suit didn't even ripple as he fell? That's why he started the violent spin.
Comment icon #8 Posted by Peter B on 4 February, 2014, 13:36
While I realise Baumgartner is Austrian, his effort in breaking the speed of sound merely by falling seems pretty Australian to me. Americans and everyone else can reach those sorts of speeds with rockets and Concord and stuff, but I think it was particularly Australian to achieve it purely by undoing his seat belt and stepping out of his vehicle. Should've been sponsored by Boags rather than Red Bull: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M8w8ye46D6w&oref=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DM8w8ye46D6w&has_verified=1
Comment icon #9 Posted by qxcontinuum on 5 February, 2014, 1:13
So tehnically everyone can travel in space using a ballon? In the same time it seems the descending was without frictioning forces and heat?
Comment icon #10 Posted by DecoNoir on 5 February, 2014, 1:27
So tehnically everyone can travel in space using a ballon? In the same time it seems the descending was without frictioning forces and heat? Wasn't travelling fast enough to generate the friction seen with meteors, which travel anywhere from 25,000 to 160,000mph (and sometimes faster). Also, 19 miles is hardly considered "space", especially when turbine jets are still operable at that altitude. For reference, NASA awards astronaut status to those who have traveled at an altitude of 50 miles, while the ISS orbits at around 220 miles from Earth's surface. Even that is considered low Earth orbit.


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