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Giant jellyfish found on Australian beach


Posted on Thursday, 6 February, 2014 | Comment icon 18 comments

Many species of jellyfish remain undiscovered. Image Credit: Henry Kaiser / NSF
Marine biologists have been struggling to identify a 4ft jellyfish that washed up on a Tasmania beach.
Thought to be related to the lion's mane jellyfish, the largest known species in the world, the unidentified creature was discovered by a family who had been out walking along the shoreline.

"We know about this specimen but it hasn't been classified yet, it hasn't been named," said scientist Lisa Gershwin. "It is so big it took our breath away. It's a whopper of an animal but it's not life-threatening, although it does sting."

Marine experts have retrieved samples from the creature and have started to analyze them in an effort to learn more about it. At present very little at all is known about the species.

"It highlights again how much we still have to learn about the ocean," said Gershwin.

Source: Sky News | Comments (18)

Tags: Jellyfish


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #9 Posted by JGirl on 6 February, 2014, 18:57
looks like a cracked egg without the yolk
Comment icon #10 Posted by Eldorado on 6 February, 2014, 18:57
And what does a jelly that size eat...? (Serious question, not a joke. ^-^) Jelly Beans. Same as everyone else. (lol)
Comment icon #11 Posted by seeder on 6 February, 2014, 18:58
And what does a jelly that size eat...? (Serious question, not a joke. ^-^) anything thats unlucky Id expect..
Comment icon #12 Posted by Sundew on 6 February, 2014, 20:28
And what does a jelly that size eat...? (Serious question, not a joke. ^-^) Depending on the toxicity of its sting; whatever it can overpower. Some box jellies are so toxic that when a fish is stung it dies very rapidly and they have been known to kill humans in less than five minutes (depending on the severity of the sting), some other jellies have relatively mild stings that cannot even be felt on human skin. The more potent the sting, the larger the prey likely taken. The scientists seem to indicate this was not a particularly dangerous sting, so it may feed on small planktonic creatures, t... [More]
Comment icon #13 Posted by ChrLzs on 6 February, 2014, 20:54
And what does a jelly that size eat...? (Serious question, not a joke. ^-^) Yep, what Sundew said - depends on the species.. Some use their stinging ability (which not all have..) to kill prey like fish, which they then slowly digest. However, their main diet is probably just zooplankton - tiny litte creatures that are abundant in the sea, and they just get trapped in the jellyfish's tentacles or body as it floats along.. An interesting factoid - not this one, but some jellyfish species are thought to be immortal, either by regenerating and re-starting their entire life cycle asexually or othe... [More]
Comment icon #14 Posted by Sir Wearer of Hats on 6 February, 2014, 21:48
And what does a jelly that size eat...? (Serious question, not a joke. ^-^) Hope and Sanity.
Comment icon #15 Posted by ancient astronaut on 7 February, 2014, 3:09
Whatever it is, if found in Scotland it would now be in a soup pot not on the news. (lol) Just like here in Louisiana, we eat damn near everything.
Comment icon #16 Posted by Awake2Chaos on 7 February, 2014, 3:15
Nice nightmare fodder. That would be a bummer to run into out in the surf.
Comment icon #17 Posted by coolguy on 7 February, 2014, 4:53
Very cool, jelly fish are very cool creature any pics
Comment icon #18 Posted by YukiEsmaElite0 on 7 February, 2014, 18:33
Hahahah... It sounds like the jelly eats everything according to everyone on here...


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