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Prehistoric pterosaur colony discovered


Posted on Thursday, 14 August, 2014 | Comment icon 6 comments

Huge winged reptiles once dominated the prehistoric skies. Image Credit: CC BY-SA 3.0 Mark Witton
Scientists have found the fossil remains of several dozen members of a previously unknown species.
The colony, which was situated in a desert lake in southern Brazil, dates back 100 million years and is thought to have been populated by as many as several hundred juveniles and adults.

A previously undiscovered species, Caiuajara dobruskii was a flying reptile with a large bony crest on its head and a wingspan measuring up to 8ft. The discovery is particularly rare and valuable because it is the first time that such an extensive "bone bed" has been found for a pterosaur species.

"The presence of three main levels of accumulation in a section of less than one metre suggests that this region was home to pterosaur populations for an extended period of time," said study leader Dr Alexander Kellner of Rio de Janeiro's Federal University.

"The causes of death remain unknown, although similarities with dinosaur drought-related mortality are striking. However, it is also possible that desert storms could have been responsible for the occasional demise of these pterosaurs."

Source: Telegraph | Comments (6)

Tags: Dinosaur, Pterosaur


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by bubblykiss on 14 August, 2014, 16:51
Anyone else getting tired of dinosaurs being named in languages other than Latin and Greek?
Comment icon #2 Posted by Ichihara on 14 August, 2014, 23:09
flock gathering to die together so that one day we could have fossil fuels.
Comment icon #3 Posted by magikgoddess on 15 August, 2014, 0:36
Love dinos, but I agree with bubbly on this. Neat article, thanks for the share.
Comment icon #4 Posted by EnderOTD on 15 August, 2014, 1:44
Anyone else getting tired of dinosaurs being named in languages other than Latin and Greek? What's the difference? Naming typically is left to who discovers a species, and considering it was discovered in Brazil it isn't really surprising that they would give it a name in the regional language, which is mostly Portuguese I believe.
Comment icon #5 Posted by Silent Trinity on 15 August, 2014, 15:10
Great article, always great to discover a new species regardless of its name and always great to learn more about their movements and habits.
Comment icon #6 Posted by bobb73 on 16 August, 2014, 14:54
It's doubtful a storm was the cause of this colonies demise....perhaps it was West Indian Lilac?


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