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Remnants of one of the earliest stars found


Posted on Saturday, 23 August, 2014 | Comment icon 4 comments

The earliest stars are thought to have been gigantic. Image Credit: NASA/SDO
An ancient orange star has revealed hints of one of the first stars to ever exist in the universe.
Observations of the star, which is believed to have been formed from the remnants of an even earlier primordial star that exploded as a huge supernova, have indicated that some of the first stars in the cosmos were enormous - in this case more than 140 times more massive than our sun.

The find confirms long-running speculation by scientists that the universe's earliest stars must have been very large.

Current theories suggest that the first stars formed several hundred million years after the Big Bang at a time when the cosmos was pervaded by a thin soup of hydrogen, helium and dark matter.

Source: National Geographic | Comments (4)

Tags: Star, Universe


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by CRYSiiSx2 on 23 August, 2014, 17:22
I wonder how massive a star could get before its core has so much gravity it becomes a black hole... I know previous theories as to how large stars can get have been shattered. I'm sure its just a matter of time before we find an even bigger one.
Comment icon #2 Posted by Silent Trinity on 25 August, 2014, 6:24
Very interesting. I wonder if the thin soup of Hydrogen, Helium and Dark Matter created an environment which favoured larger bodies as opposed to smaller, less stable examples. I am a laymen of course and by no means qualified to postulate such a theory, but it just seemed a natural question, was this a peccadillo of the make up of the universe at the time?
Comment icon #3 Posted by FizzPuff on 25 August, 2014, 14:03
This bloody fascinates me, I wanna know more!
Comment icon #4 Posted by paperdyer on 25 August, 2014, 16:21
This bloody fascinates me, I wanna know more! So do I. The more we discover, we realize how little we really know.


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