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Brian the 'surfing' spider can walk on water

Posted on Thursday, 10 March, 2016 | Comment icon 7 comments

The spider is able to catch food while walking on water. Image Credit: CC BY 3.0 Queensland Museum
A newly discovered species of spider in Australia spends most of its time hunting in freshwater streams.
Named 'Dolomedes Briangreenei' in honor of World Science Festival co-founder Professor Brian Greene, the new spider is a master of walking on water and is able to hunt by listening out for the vibrations of its prey which include insects, tadpoles, fish, frogs and even cane toads.

"These spiders sit there on the water and then all of a sudden an insect will hit the water and the spider races out to get it, grabs it, dives under the water and then swims back to the shore and starts eating it," said Queensland Museum spider expert Robert Raven.

The spider, which was revealed during the 2016 World Science Festival, was discovered in the streams of Brisbane, Australia and is fortunately not thought to be harmful to humans.

"Physics is all about waves; understanding the universe is all about waves," said Professor Greene.

"With the announcement last month of humankindís first detection of gravitational waves - ripples on the surface of space and time - I am particularly honoured to be so closely associated with a spider that has its own deep affinity for waves."

Source: Telegraph | Comments (7)

Tags: Spider, Brian

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Not Your Huckleberry on 10 March, 2016, 20:12
Was the Dolomedes genus previously unheard of in Australia? Several species here in the US, all characterized as "fishing spiders". Very cool genus and some species have a legspan the size of your hand.
Comment icon #2 Posted by El Noctem on 10 March, 2016, 22:04
Haaaaaaaang on a minute! I've seen this spider before in Western Australia, and took pictures. I always thought it was a nursery Web spider?
Comment icon #3 Posted by Buzz_Light_Year on 10 March, 2016, 23:27
Like Australia really needed another spider.
Comment icon #4 Posted by ChaosRose on 12 March, 2016, 0:00
Just when you thought it was safe to go back in the water...
Comment icon #5 Posted by AustinHinton on 12 March, 2016, 3:44
*insert spider-Jesus joke*
Comment icon #6 Posted by smokeycat on 12 March, 2016, 23:52
Was the Dolomedes genus previously unheard of in Australia? Several species here in the US, all characterized as "fishing spiders". Very cool genus and some species have a legspan the size of your hand. Same in the UK. Great raft spider (Dolomedes plantarius).
Comment icon #7 Posted by hicktowngirl95 on 13 April, 2016, 18:49
Soo...A raft spider? Pretty sure those have already been discovered and named...

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