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Mystery surrounds Amazon's 'Stonehenge'


Posted on Friday, 16 December, 2016 | Comment icon 14 comments
An ancient civilization is believed to have built standing stones in the rainforest over 1,000 years ago.
The idea that the Amazon has remained mostly untouched by human civilization save for the activities of a few nomadic tribes has been called in to question following the discovery of a megalithic stone monument in Brazil.

Thought to date back 1,000 years, these standing stones appear to have been erected by a civilization that lived in the region centuries before Europeans first arrived on the scene.


This, coupled with the recent discovery of land carvings, fortified settlements and complex road networks, has suggested that the Amazon may have once been home to over 10 million people.

"We're starting to piece together the puzzle of the Amazon Basin's human history, and what we're finding in Amapa is absolutely fascinating," said archaeologist Mariana Cabral.

The monument was discovered by Lailson Camelo da Silva, a cattle ranch foreman who stumbled across the stones while he was razing trees to convert an area of rainforest in to new pasture.

"I had no idea that I was discovering the Amazon's own Stonehenge," he said.

Source: New York Times | Comments (14)

Tags: Stonehenge, Brazil, Amazon

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #5 Posted by paperdyer on 16 December, 2016, 19:18
When the Moon shone through - Time to make the sacrifice!
Comment icon #6 Posted by Thorvir Hrothgaard on 16 December, 2016, 20:09
Yeah, I agree.  All those telephones, aircraft, space craft, work on genetics they had....we just can't compare to ancient man. 
Comment icon #7 Posted by Parsec on 17 December, 2016, 14:21
We are lucky mr. da Silva stopped razing and didn't carry on.    That's a very interesting find! 
Comment icon #8 Posted by Jungleboogie on 17 December, 2016, 18:50
From the article: " Instead, some scholars now assert that the world’s largest tropical rain forest was far less “Edenic” than previously imagined, and that the Amazon supported a population of as many as 10 million people before the epidemics and large-scale slaughter put into motion by European colonizers. " What a stupid assumption.  A holocaust of 10 million people with not a shred of documentation or historical record cited. The conquistadors of the age were fond of bragging about their travesties to the crowns back in Europe.  It was a good way to ensure continued funding.  A slaughter o... [More]
Comment icon #9 Posted by Rofflaren on 17 December, 2016, 19:30
most died of diseases... I think you might have missed som history classes in school.   ex from wiki While technological and cultural factors played an important role in the victories of the conquistadors in the Americas, this was facilitated by old world diseases, smallpox, chicken pox, diphtheria, typhus, influenza, measles, malaria and yellow fever. The diseases were carried to distant tribes and villages. This typical path of disease transmission moved much faster than the conquistadors so that as they advanced, resistance weakened.[citation needed] Epidemic disease is commonly cited as th... [More]
Comment icon #10 Posted by Tatetopa on 17 December, 2016, 20:11
You might enjoy 1491 by Charles Mann.  It is full of citations you can follow.  Yes there are references to large populations, elevated village sites, elevated roads between them  in the Amazon.  There is some positional observations that fruit and nut trees were not scattered randomly through the jungle but clustered around village sites. This is not ancient man, these people were contemporary to most of our European ancestors.  Different environment, different skill set.  And Thorvir, not to make you jealous,  but all of our ancestors made  up for the lack of cell phones and surfing the net ... [More]
Comment icon #11 Posted by Thorvir on 18 December, 2016, 18:35
Which are amazing things we can do now.
Comment icon #12 Posted by Anomalous_Zombie on 29 December, 2016, 9:04
Looks almost like ruins of some sort of larger monument or structure. Very cool discovery!
Comment icon #13 Posted by Jungleboogie on 10 January, 2017, 8:09
I agree with your assertion.  The idea of 'large scale slaughter' from the article is what I was referring to as ludicrous.
Comment icon #14 Posted by oldrover on 10 January, 2017, 9:59
I don't have sources for this to hand, but, there is apparently evidence to suggest that much of the Amazon basin was settled around the time of European arrival. My memories are sketchy but I believe soil analyses plus some sort of satellite topography(?) indicates that much of what we think of as primeval forest is in fact secondary growth on old agricultural land. I don't know.  A for the rock with the hole in it, they should analyse the surfaces of that for traces of pigment.  https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/e7/33/d2/e733d29654f4f495b23e7abec1d55f13.jpg


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