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Scientist is seeking Loch Ness Monster's DNA


Posted on Wednesday, 5 April, 2017 | Comment icon 14 comments

Could analyzing the water reveal the identity of Nessie ? Image Credit: Google Street View
Professor Neil Gemmell is hoping to acquire a DNA sample of the legendary Scottish lake monster.
Several researchers have attempted to locate signs of a large creature in the depths of Loch Ness over the years, but while to date their efforts have come up empty, there's a chance that modern science may have finally caught up enough to solve the mystery once and for all.

Professor Gemmell, who heads up the anatomy department at the University of Otago in New Zealand, is looking to collect and analyze samples from the loch because he believes that modern genomic technology is now sensitive enough to be able to detect the creature's cells in the water.

To determine what type of creature the monster is, all he would need to do is filter out the genetic data for all known animals in the loch to see what's left afterwards.

"Is there anything in Loch Ness that looks different from everything else ?" he said.

"It started out as an idea that I voiced on Twitter with some other colleagues, and it's been picked up and it seems to have grown some legitimate legs."

While the project still needs funding in order to go ahead, Loch Ness Project leader Adrian Shine has expressed an interest in helping out by collecting the necessary water samples.

"I would be very interested in the results," he said.

Source: odt.co.nz | Comments (14)

Tags: Loch Ness Monster

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #5 Posted by paperdyer on 5 April, 2017, 19:44
I just hope that if they find anything odd we'll see a headline---"NESSIE FOUND!" film at 11
Comment icon #6 Posted by stereologist on 5 April, 2017, 21:28
I doubt that Nessie will be found, but I would not be surprised that they find some other interesting specie in that area. That happens every time someone goes out looking, they find something interesting to report on. It might be a new shrimp, or sponge, or alga, or fish.
Comment icon #7 Posted by Podo on 5 April, 2017, 23:16
Which is why cryptid searches aren't a waste of time. They won't find the thing they're looking for, but they'll probably find something interesting.
Comment icon #8 Posted by quiXilver on 6 April, 2017, 4:37
in the end, either with instruments or our own senses, wherever we manage to look, we perceive something... wonder what they'll find.
Comment icon #9 Posted by Hammerclaw on 6 April, 2017, 8:46
Cthulhu?
Comment icon #10 Posted by DieChecker on 6 April, 2017, 13:43
Sounds like looking for a needle in a haystack by examining each piece of hay in the lab one at a time.
Comment icon #11 Posted by Maureen_jacobs on 13 April, 2017, 23:40
If you have three fitty, the Loch Ness Monster will be at your door. serously, might come up with something interesting.
Comment icon #12 Posted by taniwha on 14 April, 2017, 0:58
This will no doubt prove once and for all that no trace of Nessie will be found.
Comment icon #13 Posted by Claire. on 25 April, 2017, 20:41
The beauty of eDNA is that it can potentially help biologists track elusive or hidden species, and that it also has the capability of drastically changing conservation biology as we know it. Here's a good article from Smithsonian.com with more of the science and practical applications behind it.
Comment icon #14 Posted by oldrover on 25 April, 2017, 20:45
It does have a tremendous promise. I know it's going to be bad news, or no news, but I hope they start applying this in Tasmania.


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