Saturday, October 21, 2017
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help   RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in

DARPA investigating fast learning methods


Posted on Monday, 8 May, 2017 | Comment icon 6 comments

Can electrical stimulation speed up the learning process ? Image Credit: CC BY 2.0 Allan Ajifo
Researchers at DARPA want to make it possible for a soldier to be trained in a fraction of the time.
In the movie franchise 'The Matrix', one of the advantages of being jacked in to a totally immersive computer simulation is the ability to learn just about anything at all in a matter of seconds simply by having that information uploaded directly in to your brain.

While the ability to do this in real life is still likely to be many years away, scientists at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) are currently investigating ways in which the learning process can be accelerated so that people can acquire major new skills in months rather than years.

The key, the researchers believe, lies in stimulating the peripheral nerves responsible for relaying signals between the brain, the spinal cord and the rest of the body - a process that can trigger the release of neurochemicals capable of reorganizing connections inside the brain.

DARPA's Targeted Neuroplasticity Training program is currently exploring eight different ways to enhance learning by targeting these particular nerves with electrical stimulation.

If it succeeds then the technique could revolutionize learning, both in the military and elsewhere.

Imagine learning an entirely new language in a couple of months - the possibilities are endless.

Source: Gizmodo | Comments (6)

Tags: DARPA, Learning

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by khol on 8 May, 2017, 23:07
let the integration begin..
Comment icon #2 Posted by S I N on 8 May, 2017, 23:41
I know kung fu
Comment icon #3 Posted by highdesert50 on 9 May, 2017, 0:00
Seems a bit naive as there is a lot more to learning than simply acquiring knowledge. Even then there are individual differences that require we appropriately link new learning into prior learning in order to retrieve and use the knowledge. The real questions begin with how will the learning be used. For example, does this learning need to be understood in a problem solving context? Does it need to occur in the context of social interaction? The needs should drive the methods.
Comment icon #4 Posted by Nzo on 9 May, 2017, 8:39
Keep people happy while learning. I don't remember who did the research but they scanned the brain while teaching students something new and found that the group that was learning in a fun happy manner was able to learn faster, with much more learned(bandwidth I guess) and with much greater retention. Darpa pay me 1 million dollars for pointing you to research that's been out at least 30 years.
Comment icon #5 Posted by Calibeliever on 9 May, 2017, 20:00
Give 'em a call. According to one commenter on the story they might!
Comment icon #6 Posted by paperdyer on 10 May, 2017, 15:39
Isn't training also you to give you "muscle memory" so the action becomes more instinct and automatic. Just because someone knows everything about something isn't all of it. For instance, you can teach a person to bowl or play baseball or football from an academic standpoint. But without actually doing it and seeing if you have the ability it's a bit pointless. If repetitive usage can be learned anyone could be an expert in any endeavor. OK, learning how to use electronic equipment might be possible as the how to part is the most important, but anything needing physical prowess, I serious... [More]


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


  On the forums
Forum posts:
Forum topics:
Members:

6009857
258468
170294

 
9.7 million-year-old hominin teeth discovered
10-20-2017
The surprising find has the potential to completely rewrite everything we know of early human history.
Flying insect numbers drop by 75% in 27 years
10-20-2017
A new study has highlighted a huge reduction in the number of flying insects in Germany's nature reserves.
Car appears out of nowhere in puzzling footage
10-20-2017
An intriguing optical illusion has been leaving social media users scratching their heads this week.
Huge 50km-long cave discovered on the Moon
10-19-2017
The Japanese space agency JAXA has announced the discovery of a cave hidden beneath the lunar surface.
Featured Videos
Gallery icon 
Recreating your face from DNA
Posted 10-18-2017 | 0 comments
Is it possible to determine someone's appearance from a sample of their DNA ?
 
Schlieren imaging in color
Posted 10-16-2017 | 2 comments
A look at Schlieren imaging - a technique that can help to visualize tiny differences in air.
 
Glowing creatures of the deep
Posted 10-15-2017 | 0 comments
This vintage clip sees Sir David Attenborough descending in to the dark depths of the sea.
 
 View: More videos
Stories & Experiences
Sleep paralysis or real encounter?
10-18-2017 | United Kingdom
 
Ghost playing with a balloon?
10-18-2017 | Australia
 
Impossible phone call
10-18-2017 | West Virginia
 
Seeing cats
10-18-2017 | Santa Rosa
 
Fourth of July UFO show
10-18-2017 | Hillsboro ND
 
Guardian angel ?
9-13-2017 | Middle of nowhere Iowa
 
I'm not normal, but I'm not alone
9-13-2017 | South Africa
 
When I was very little
9-13-2017 | Sturgis So.Dakota
 
Weird light orbs and chills
9-13-2017 | Poland
 
Unexplained light flashes
8-30-2017 | Louisiana
 

         More stories | Send us your story
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.7 Unexplained-Mysteries.com 2001-2017
Privacy Policy and Disclaimer   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ