Sunday, December 17, 2017
Contact us    |    Advertise    |   Help   RSS icon Twitter icon Facebook icon
    Home  ·  News  ·  Forum  ·  Stories  ·  Image Gallery  ·  Columns  ·  Encyclopedia  ·  Videos
Find: in

DARPA investigating fast learning methods


Posted on Monday, 8 May, 2017 | Comment icon 6 comments

Can electrical stimulation speed up the learning process ? Image Credit: CC BY 2.0 Allan Ajifo
Researchers at DARPA want to make it possible for a soldier to be trained in a fraction of the time.
In the movie franchise 'The Matrix', one of the advantages of being jacked in to a totally immersive computer simulation is the ability to learn just about anything at all in a matter of seconds simply by having that information uploaded directly in to your brain.

While the ability to do this in real life is still likely to be many years away, scientists at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) are currently investigating ways in which the learning process can be accelerated so that people can acquire major new skills in months rather than years.

The key, the researchers believe, lies in stimulating the peripheral nerves responsible for relaying signals between the brain, the spinal cord and the rest of the body - a process that can trigger the release of neurochemicals capable of reorganizing connections inside the brain.

DARPA's Targeted Neuroplasticity Training program is currently exploring eight different ways to enhance learning by targeting these particular nerves with electrical stimulation.

If it succeeds then the technique could revolutionize learning, both in the military and elsewhere.

Imagine learning an entirely new language in a couple of months - the possibilities are endless.

Source: Gizmodo | Comments (6)

Tags: DARPA, Learning

Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by khol on 8 May, 2017, 23:07
let the integration begin..
Comment icon #2 Posted by S I N on 8 May, 2017, 23:41
I know kung fu
Comment icon #3 Posted by highdesert50 on 9 May, 2017, 0:00
Seems a bit naive as there is a lot more to learning than simply acquiring knowledge. Even then there are individual differences that require we appropriately link new learning into prior learning in order to retrieve and use the knowledge. The real questions begin with how will the learning be used. For example, does this learning need to be understood in a problem solving context? Does it need to occur in the context of social interaction? The needs should drive the methods.
Comment icon #4 Posted by Nzo on 9 May, 2017, 8:39
Keep people happy while learning. I don't remember who did the research but they scanned the brain while teaching students something new and found that the group that was learning in a fun happy manner was able to learn faster, with much more learned(bandwidth I guess) and with much greater retention.  Darpa pay me 1 million dollars for pointing you to research that's been out at least 30 years. 
Comment icon #5 Posted by Calibeliever on 9 May, 2017, 20:00
Give 'em a call. According to one commenter on the story they might!
Comment icon #6 Posted by paperdyer on 10 May, 2017, 15:39
Isn't training also you to give you "muscle memory" so the action becomes more instinct and automatic.  Just because someone knows everything about something isn't all of it.  For instance, you can teach a person to bowl or play baseball or football from an academic standpoint.  But without actually doing it and seeing if you have the ability it's a bit pointless.  If repetitive usage can be learned anyone could be an expert in any endeavor.  OK, learning how to use electronic equipment might be possible as the how to part is the most important, but anything needing physical prowess, I serious... [More]


Please Login or Register to post a comment.


  On the forums
Forum posts:
Forum topics:
Members:

6056850
259838
171735

 
Rare rhino has been endangered for 9,000 years
12-17-2017
There are now fewer than 100 Sumatran rhinos left on Earth, but exactly who or what is responsible ?
Footage of US nuclear tests published online
12-16-2017
The 62 newly declassified videos show nuclear bomb experiments being conducted between 1945 and 1962.
'Extinct' mammal found alive in Australia
12-16-2017
The crest-tailed mulgara - a small carnivorous marsupial - was thought to have died out a century ago.
Glowing trees could replace street lights
12-16-2017
By embedding nanoparticles in leaves, scientists at MIT have created plants that glow in the dark.
Featured Videos
Gallery icon 
Slow motion wrecking ball
Posted 12-16-2017 | 1 comment
The Slo Mo Guys record the destruction of a vehicle using a 9000lb wrecking ball.
 
Einstein's brain
Posted 12-13-2017 | 0 comments
After he died, legendary physicist Albert Einstein's brain was preserved for study.
 
Is happiness contagious ?
Posted 12-12-2017 | 0 comments
Is it possible to become happy by hanging out with other people who are happy ?
 
 View: More videos
Stories & Experiences
Mysterious Headlights
12-10-2017 | Morgan County, Alabama
 
Possibly a child ghost
12-10-2017 | Edgewater, Maryland
 
True story about black-eyed kids
12-10-2017 | Portland oregon
 
Alien or paranormal encounter ?
12-10-2017 | United States
 
Ouija board experience
12-10-2017 | Ohio
 
Strange occurrences
11-15-2017 | Fife
 
Mysterious music box song
11-15-2017 | U.S.A
 
Haunted military house
10-23-2017 | New Zealand
 
Sleep paralysis or real encounter?
10-18-2017 | United Kingdom
 

         More stories | Send us your story
 
Top   |  Home   |   Forum   |   News   |   Image Gallery   |  Columns   |   Encyclopedia   |   Videos   |   Polls
UM-X 10.7 Unexplained-Mysteries.com © 2001-2017
Privacy Policy and Disclaimer   |   Cookies   |   Advertise   |   Contact   |   Help/FAQ