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Why did neanderthals have such big noses ?

Posted on Wednesday, 29 October, 2008 | Comment icon 5 comments


Image credit: Wikipedia
 
"The neanderthal's huge nose is a fluke of evolution, not some grand adaptation, research suggests."

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 Source: New Scientist


  Discuss: View comments (5)

   


 
Recent comments on this story
Comment icon #1 Posted by Still Waters on 29 October, 2008, 10:39
Why did neanderthals have such big noses ?.......all the better to smell with sorry...couldn't resist
Comment icon #2 Posted by Moon Demon on 29 October, 2008, 14:44
Yeah, made me laugh, a funny article he said big nose
Comment icon #3 Posted by jdlsmith on 30 October, 2008, 7:04
Why did neanderthals have such big noses? Because they had big fingers...
Comment icon #4 Posted by Gatofeo on 31 October, 2008, 17:23
A big nose? Hmmmm .. reminds me of a scene from Young Frankenstein ... "He would have an enormous schwanstucker. Whew!" Neandertal women were spoiled, no doubt!
Comment icon #5 Posted by theQ on 4 November, 2008, 9:00
WHY?.....ITS OBVIOUS, THE HAD BIG FINGERS.


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